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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Joy M. Field, Liana Victorino, Ryan W. Buell, Michael J. Dixon, Susan Meyer Goldstein, Larry J. Menor, Madeleine E. Pullman, Aleda V. Roth, Enrico Secchi and Jie J. Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to present exciting and innovative research questions in service operations that are aligned with eight key themes and related topics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present exciting and innovative research questions in service operations that are aligned with eight key themes and related topics determined by the Journal of Service Management (JOSM) Service Operations Expert Research Panel. By offering a good number of such research questions, this paper provides a broad range of ideas to spur conceptual and empirical research related to service operations and encourage the continued creation of deep knowledge within the field, as well as collaborative research across disciplines that develops and incorporates insights from service operations.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a Delphi study, described in the companion article, “Service Operations: What Have We Learned?,” the panel identified eight key research themes in service operations where leading-edge research is being done or has yet to be done (Victorino et al., 2018). In this paper, three or four topics within each theme are selected and multiple questions for each topic are proposed to guide research efforts. The topics and questions, while wide-ranging, are only representative of the many ongoing research opportunities related to service operations.

Findings

The field of service operations has many interesting research topics and questions that are largely unexplored. Furthermore, these research areas are not only increasingly integrative across multiple themes within operations but often transcend functional disciplines. This creates opportunities for ever more impactful research with a greater reach throughout the service system and suggests that service researchers, regardless of functional affiliation, can contribute to the ongoing conversation on the role of service operations in value creation.

Originality/value

Leveraging the collective knowledge of the JOSM Service Operations Expert Research Panel to expand on the research themes generated from the Delphi study, novel questions for future study are put forward. Recognizing that the number of potential research questions is virtually unlimited, summary questions by theme and topic are also provided. These questions represent a synopsis of the individual questions and can serve as a quick reference guide for researchers interested in pursuing new directions in conceptual and empirical research in service operations. This summary also serves as a framework to facilitate the formulation of additional research topics and questions.

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2018

Liana Victorino, Joy M. Field, Ryan W. Buell, Michael J. Dixon, Susan Meyer Goldstein, Larry J. Menor, Madeleine E. Pullman, Aleda V. Roth, Enrico Secchi and Jie J. Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to identify research themes in service operations that have great potential for exciting and innovative conceptual and empirical work. To…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify research themes in service operations that have great potential for exciting and innovative conceptual and empirical work. To frame these research themes, the paper provides a systematic literature review of operations articles published in the Journal of Service Management (JOSM). The thorough review of published work in JOSM and proposed research themes are presented in hopes that they will inspire impactful research on service operations. These themes are further developed in a companion paper, “Service operations: what’s next?” (Field et al., 2018).

Design/methodology/approach

The JOSM Service Operations Expert Research Panel conducted a Delphi study to generate research themes where leading-edge research on service operations is being done or has yet to be done. Nearly 700 articles published in JOSM from its inception through 2016 were reviewed and classified by discipline focus. The subset of service operations articles was then further categorized according to the eight identified research themes plus an additional category that primarily represented traditional manufacturing approaches applied in service settings.

Findings

From the Delphi study, the following key themes emerged: service supply networks, evaluating and measuring service operations performance, understanding customer and employee behavior in service operations, managing servitization, managing knowledge-based service contexts, managing participation roles and responsibilities in service operations, addressing society’s challenges through service operations, and the operational implications of the sharing economy. Based on the literature review, approximately 20 percent of the published work in JOSM is operations focused, with earlier articles predominantly applying traditional manufacturing approaches in service settings. However, the percentage of these traditional types of articles has been steadily decreasing, suggesting a trend toward dedicated research frameworks and themes that are unique to the design and management of services operations.

Originality/value

The paper presents key research themes for advancing conceptual and empirical research on service operations. Additionally, a review of the past and current landscape of operations articles published in JOSM offers an understanding of the scholarly conversation so far and sets a foundation from which to build future research.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Jesse Dillard and Madeleine E. Pullman

Abstract

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Carol Adams and Liliana Petrella

The purpose of this paper is to report on the highlights of the UN Global Compact Leaders Summit, the Principles for Responsible Management Education Global Forum and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the highlights of the UN Global Compact Leaders Summit, the Principles for Responsible Management Education Global Forum and the Globally Responsible Leadership Initiative General Assembly held in New York and Boston in June 2010. It discusses the potential of the connections and collaborations between these organisations and others to lead to change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws out key themes of these concurrent events; connections and collaborations between these initiatives and others; and considers the potential of further collaborations to facilitate change.

Findings

There is an acceptance on the part of business of the need to be more socially and environmentally responsible, but a lack of technical know‐how and leadership capacity. Universities generally, and business schools in particular, need to do more to develop graduates for a changing business context with specific reference to the overarching challenge of the twenty‐first century to achieve global environmental sustainability and social justice.

Practical implications

Further collaboration between these organisations is important to drive change through, e.g. sustainability performance management at universities; accreditation processes; and, partnerships between business schools, business and civil society organisations.

Originality/value

The originality and value of this paper is in summarising the highlights of three key interconnected events, the collaborations that led to them, the connections that are strengthening between the organisations and potential of those connections to facilitate change.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Hank C. Alewine

The purpose of this paper is to survey the research methods employed in the extant environmental accounting literature, finding few experimental studies. The need for more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to survey the research methods employed in the extant environmental accounting literature, finding few experimental studies. The need for more experimentation in the literature is discussed, as well as how experiments' unique methodological advantages can help address important environmental accounting issues. These issues culminate in a proposed model for conducting experimental environmental accounting research.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of the environmental accounting literature emphasizes the research methods, and, advantages and disadvantages of each method, as well as why and how experimental designs can contribute to the environmental accounting literature. Finally, the paper proposes and analyzes a framework for conducting environmental accounting experiments.

Findings

Experiments can provide unique contributions to the environmental accounting literature. Relative to traditional accounting information, environmental accounting information comprises lower levels of user familiarity which may hinder effective processing of these non‐traditional data. These characteristics make the organizational display of these data, and their combination with non‐environmental metrics, a particular and unique concern. The proposed model considers the impact of environmental strategy on the implementation of environmental information systems, which in turn influences evaluation effectiveness of decisions based on environmental accounting information. Stakeholder influences, management communication of environmental issues, and evaluation scales also influence these relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The model assumes environmental information generates from within the entity (i.e. private firms, public agencies, etc.). Future research can enhance and/or modify the framework to include information design and capture from non‐entity end‐users (e.g. stakeholders), as well as empirically test the model's relationships.

Practical implications

The framework provides factors to consider to design more effective environmental accounting information systems. Also, the model's factors should aid researchers in developing robust experimental designs for environmental accounting studies.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to propose a framework for conducting experimental environmental accounting research.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Madeleine E. Pullman and William L. Moore

This paper develops an optimal service design model by combining a conjoint analysis‐based optimal product design model from marketing with capacity and demand management…

Abstract

This paper develops an optimal service design model by combining a conjoint analysis‐based optimal product design model from marketing with capacity and demand management strategies from operations management to determine a profit maximizing service facility. It extends optimal product design models to services by specifically modeling the interactive relationship between potential attractiveness of a service, capacity and waiting times. Additionally it extends current capacity‐demand operations models by modeling the impacts of different capacity/demand matching strategies in a competitive market. Combining these two perspectives provides a more direct link between customer perceptions of various service attributes, including waiting time and profitability. An example is shown where the model is applied to an existing ski resort. Data are incorporated from resort management, existing customers, potential customers and industry experts to determine the profit maximizing mix of capacity and demand management strategies for an actual ski resort. The results show that important insights about profit maximization are gained from a model that captures the effects of capacity and demand management strategies.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Randolph E. Schwering

This paper forwards a conceptual model identifying some of the key sources of judgment error in individual environmental sensemaking. Recommendations are offered to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper forwards a conceptual model identifying some of the key sources of judgment error in individual environmental sensemaking. Recommendations are offered to mitigate some of these biasing dysfunctions and thereby improve the effectiveness of environmentally related business policy.

Design/methodology/approach

Theories of cognitive and behavioral sciences are reviewed and applied to create a conceptual model describing some of the key influences on individual sensemaking in regard to environmental risk and opportunity.

Findings

It is found that the model presented in this paper contributes to the literature of corporate social responsibility in explaining some of the heuristic phenomena that can lead to denial of a firm's negative environmental impact, or conversely, recognition of emerging opportunities arising from increasing societal concern for environmental integrity. Many environmental scientists believe denial is omnipresent in modern business and governmental organizations. In addition, because the model is grounded in well‐established theories of problematic heuristic bias, it helps identify “leverage points” where well‐designed interventions can be deployed to promote learning and improved decision making. The model helps the decision maker better understand and potentially influence ethical judgment because ethical decision making is conceived within the frame of bounded ethicality versus a less potent theory of intervention based upon espoused moral prescriptions.

Research limitations/implications

Some important influences on environmental sensemaking are not emphasized in the model to include dimensions of individual personality, early childhood experiences, gender, religious background, etc. Rather, the emphasis here is placed upon relatively ubiquitous cognitive heuristics and other cognitive phenomena likely to influence many organizational decision makers.

Originality/value

This analysis and resulting conceptual model should help change agents, students, policy makers and business practitioners avoid predictable biases and sensemaking distortions and, in so doing, improve the firm's social responsibility profile and recognition of emerging business opportunities growing out of sustainability imperatives.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Erica Mina Okada and Eric L. Mais

Many market examples show that consumers are willing to pay a premium for “green” products and services. The purpose of this paper is to gain some insight into how…

Abstract

Purpose

Many market examples show that consumers are willing to pay a premium for “green” products and services. The purpose of this paper is to gain some insight into how consumers respond to green alternatives, and examine how managers can best position their green products to maximize the premium consumers are willing to pay.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of behavioral experiments was conducted to demonstrate how the green product's characteristics are framed significantly affects the size of the “green premium” consumers are willing to pay.

Findings

The results show that positive framing (focusing on the advantages of the green product) works best for environmentally conscious consumers while negative framing (focusing on avoiding the disadvantages of the non‐green product) works best for less environmentally conscious consumers. Additionally, subtractive price framing which focuses on the discount consumers would pay for the non‐green product alternative results in a higher green premium than additive price framing which focuses on the additional price consumers would pay for the green choice, and especially so for less environmentally conscious consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, the results suggest that green firms can maximize the green‐pricing premium by careful targeting of consumers and framing their products appropriately.

Originality/value

This paper explores how the difference between the green versus non‐green alternative can be framed in different ways, and interact with the consumer's level of environmental consciousness, to influence the “green premium,”, i.e. how much more consumers are willing to pay for the green alternative relative to a comparable non‐green alternative.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Elizabeth Stubblefield Loucks, Martin L. Martens and Charles H. Cho

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to meaningfully engage small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in strategies that improve the social and environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to meaningfully engage small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in strategies that improve the social and environmental sustainability of their businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual review of the business case for sustainable development that has been offered to the business world. The paper describes the unique features of SMEs that indicate the need to reframe the case for socially and environmentally sustainable business practices for SMEs, and, using arguments discussed in the literature, we summarize the business case for sustainable development that has been specified for SMEs.

Findings

SMEs need particular attention when it comes to business strategies for sustainable development, since the business case is not the same as for large firms. Furthermore, tools that are developed to support sustainability in SMEs need to recognize that these companies have different resources and profiles than larger firms.

Research limitations/implications

Sustainable development as a concept captures most issues facing our societies, which means there are endless possibilities for companies to find strategies that will impact – and hopefully improve – their social and environmental performance. While this paper does not provide empirical evidence and support, it offers some insights on practical and social implications of SMEs engaging in sustainability.

Practical implications

This overview may help and give ideas to owners and managers of SMEs to rethink their overall business strategy by not only incorporating sustainability in their core values and actions but also implementing such strategy. In fact, this diversity of opportunities is where there is hope for turning the current world trajectory towards healthy and resilient human and natural communities.

Originality/value

This paper provides review of the current debates and opportunities in business strategies for sustainable development, and an application to the realities of business operations for SMEs.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Madeleine E. Pullman and Jesse Dillard

The purpose of this paper is to describe an emergent supply chain management system that supports a sustainable values based organization (VBO) using a structuration…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an emergent supply chain management system that supports a sustainable values based organization (VBO) using a structuration theory‐based framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a sustainable beef cooperative employing a structuration theory framework provides insights into sustainable supply chain management models.

Findings

The supply chain design and management afford the key to the VBO's success. In order to attain the necessary price premium, the unique product attributes acquired through the natural beef production process must be sustained along the entire supply chain and communicated to the end customer. Structuration theory is useful in understanding supply chain management in VBOs.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has implications for studying VBOs, particularly those prioritizing sustainability values. The descriptive model presented is useful in settings where organizational structure and the supply chain are needed to support sustainable products and processes and whose success is facilitated by establishing strategic partners, especially those that make possible economies of scale. The study is limited to one, privately owned firm, operating in a specialty industry sector.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for those entities with an identified values set that endows the product with unique characteristics that must be conveyed to their end consumer in order to command a price premium and/or differentiate the product from a commodity. The case study provides an example of how a unique product as well as a facilitating organizational structure and supply chain emerge out of the application of a set of core values.

Originality/value

Little previous research focuses on implications of supply chain management in VBOs. In addition, the paper contributes to both the supply chain management and sustainability literature by relating supply chain management to a more comprehensive sustainability agenda including social, environmental, and long‐term economic sustainability and by a theoretically based structuring.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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