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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Nikhilesh Dholakia and Robert W. Nason

Develops an approach to the discipline of macromarketing as a means for discussion. Approaches the task of agenda by considering: scope and domain of macromarketing;…

Abstract

Develops an approach to the discipline of macromarketing as a means for discussion. Approaches the task of agenda by considering: scope and domain of macromarketing; classification of research issues at a general level; and major macromarketing issues facing different groups in various developed and underdeveloped countries. Concludes that the promise of macromarketing as an emergent field is a function of the research directions this field takes; suggests, further, that these directions are a product of social processes and therefore not a matter of prescription or infallible predictions.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Adriana Bastos, Tânia Veludo-de-Oliveira, Mirella Yani-de-Soriano, Marcio Atalla and Bruno Gualano

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how macro-social marketing can contribute to the United Nations 2030 sustainable development’s goal of reducing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how macro-social marketing can contribute to the United Nations 2030 sustainable development’s goal of reducing non-communicable diseases and promoting and well-being by addressing the wicked problem of obesity.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive, population-based intervention developed as a call-to-action movement to address obesity city-wide in Brazil was conducted and analyzed according to a macro-social marketing perspective, combined with the total process planning model (TPP).

Findings

The intervention was successful in effecting systemic change by targeting multi-level audiences to trigger active participation and interaction of multiple sectors at the macro, meso and micro levels; fostering the related positive behaviors of physical activity and healthful eating; and using a complementary range of intervening tools including events, mass media and social digital media.

Originality/value

Using a holistic view that combines macro-social marketing with the TPP, this paper offers factual evidence on how to connect research and action meaningfully to address obesity by engaging, connecting and/or partnering with multiple stakeholders in an effort to promote a healthful lifestyle and well-being.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Ann‐Marie Kennedy and Andrew Parsons

The purpose of this paper is to show how macro‐social marketing and social engineering can be integrated and to illustrate their use by governments as part of a positive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how macro‐social marketing and social engineering can be integrated and to illustrate their use by governments as part of a positive social engineering intervention with examples from the Canadian anti‐smoking campaign.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that uses the case of the Canadian anti‐smoking campaign to show that macro‐social marketing, as part of a wider systems approach, is a positive social engineering intervention.

Findings

The use of macro‐social marketing by governments is most effective when it is coupled with other interventions such as regulations, legislation, taxation, community mobilization, research, funding and education. When a government takes a systems approach to societal change, such as with the Canadian anti‐smoking campaign, this is positive use of social engineering.

Research limitations/implications

The social marketer can understand their role within the system and appreciate that they are potentially part of precipitating circumstances that make society susceptible to change. Social marketers further have a role in creating societal motivation to change, as well as promoting social flexibility, creating desirable images of change, attitudinal change and developing individual's skills, which contribute to macro‐level change.

Practical implications

Social marketers need to understand the structural and environmental factors contributing to the problem behavior and focus on the implementers and controllers of society‐wide strategic interventions.

Social implications

Eliminating all factors which enable problem behaviors creates an environmental context where it is easy for consumers to change behavior and maintain that change.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is in extending the literature on macro‐social marketing by governments and identifying the broader strategy they may be undertaking using positive social engineering. It is also in showing how marketers may use this information.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

PHILIP B. SCHARY and BORIS W. BECKER

This monograph progresses from a consideration of definitional issues to the development of a conceptual model for marketing‐logistics interaction and finally to a…

Abstract

This monograph progresses from a consideration of definitional issues to the development of a conceptual model for marketing‐logistics interaction and finally to a discussion of the issues of implementation of the model within the context of marketing strategy. Thus, following an introduction, Part II begins with definition of the field and examines the position of physical distribution in relation to marketing. Part III discusses the relationship of physical distribution and macromarketing, and is thus concerned about the social, aggregative goals of logistics systems, including the costs of distribution. Part IV continues this argument, examining specifically the influence of physical distribution on channel structure. Part V then focuses on the assumptions underlying the customer service function, asking how physical distribution can influence final demand in the market place. Part VI presents a conceptual model of marketing‐logistics demand stimulation. The operational issues concerned with its implementation are shown in Part VII; and a summary of the relevant points is presented in Part VIII. The concern has been not with presenting either new computational models nor empirical data but with presenting a new perspective on the marketing‐logistics interface. There is a need to reduce the barriers between these fields and to present more useful ways for co‐operation.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0020-7527

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Lindsay Meredith

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a template to guide practitioners in the creation of multiple marketing plans that are intended to target different groups of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a template to guide practitioners in the creation of multiple marketing plans that are intended to target different groups of stakeholders – some of whom are supportive, others adversarial, namely, the business-to-business (B2B) marketer’s agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involved a combination of purposeful sampling, real-time participatory observation, action research and secondary data analysis. The main method of this research is analytical and conceptual with the objective of identifying the diverse groups of stakeholders with whom business marketers must interact.

Findings

In cases where multiple marketing plans were used for different stakeholder groups, B2B firms encountered lower levels of negative attribution from social network systems, mass media and subsequently public and governmental stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper suggests the need for multiple marketing plans that target not only supportive customers but also neutral and adversarial stakeholders who represent a source of negative attribution because they have the potential to derail or even destroy the B2B firm’s marketing agenda. It is suggested that practitioners must also address those stakeholders who distrust or even dislike their firm and its marketing objectives.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

Ann-Marie Kennedy and Nicholas Santos

Social marketers set out to undertake interventions that benefit society. However, at times, there can be inadvertent, unintended consequences of these interventions that…

Abstract

Purpose

Social marketers set out to undertake interventions that benefit society. However, at times, there can be inadvertent, unintended consequences of these interventions that can be seen as unethical. Such ethical issues can arise from the context, process, method and outcomes of interventions and often bring to the fore the “social fairness” of social marketing. Given that social marketing is aimed at societal benefit, the authors believe that the issue of social fairness is an important one in the context of ethical social marketing. With that in mind, the purpose of this paper is to provide a discussion of the application of a normative ethical framework, labelled the integrative justice model (IJM) (Santos and Laczniak, 2009), to social marketing. This amounts to a macro-social marketing ethical framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual broadening of a normative ethical framework.

Findings

The authors hold that the IJM provides several helpful normative guidelines for improving the “social fairness” of social marketing. As such, the presented normative framework of macro-social marketing ethics provides useful guidelines for future development of social marketing codes of ethics.

Practical implications

The macro-social marketing ethics framework provides practical guidelines for social marketers to assess ethical issues in social marketing.

Originality/value

The macro-social marketing ethics framework answers the call of Carter, Mayes, Eagle and Dahl (2017) for development of ethical frameworks for social marketers. It provides a reconciliation of multiple normative frameworks to give a set of guidelines for social marketers that are clear and non-contradictory.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Morgan P. Miles, Stuart Crispin and Chickery J. Kasouf

The purpose of this paper is to better define the contribution of entrepreneurship to the advancement of marketing thought.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better define the contribution of entrepreneurship to the advancement of marketing thought.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a literature review that uses examples from the literature to propose new research directions.

Findings

The paper proposes research opportunities, and concludes that the contributions of entrepreneurship to normative macromarketing are largely absent.

Practical implications

The marketing/entrepreneurship interface continues to be a connection that is difficult to define. Yet, it is an area with rich research potential, and it is critical that marketing embraces these opportunities to strengthen its strategic focus as a discipline.

Originality/value

The paper integrates literature from a variety of perspectives from marketing and related fields, and maps the marketing/entrepreneurship interface on Hunt's classification schema.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

V. Kumar, Ankit Anand and Nandini Nim

Traditionally, firms have been dependent on internal sources such as their own employees – and up to a certain extent, on some external sources, their customers – for…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, firms have been dependent on internal sources such as their own employees – and up to a certain extent, on some external sources, their customers – for innovation. However, in the current scenario of technological dynamism, firms are exploring multiple sources to generate ideas for innovation. Therefore, there is a need to understand the relative effect of various sources of innovations on a firm’s performance.

Methodology/approach

We offer a conceptual framework where we identify six distinct sources of innovations – firm, customers, external network, competition, macro-environment, and technology and how they create value for focal firms especially their brand equity. We introduce a taxonomy of various costs and benefits related to innovations. We then argue using our proposed taxonomy to understand the relative strengths of various sources of innovation affecting a firm’s brand equity.

Findings

We discuss and compare the relative effects of these sources of innovations on a firm’s brand equity by rank-ordering the sources. The customers and the technology as a source of innovation have the maximum impact on the firm’s brand equity followed by the marginal impact of macro-environment and external network of a firm. The firm itself has a moderate impact on its brand equity, while competition has the minimal impact. Further, we also discuss how the relationship is moderated by different innovation characteristics (nature and type of innovations).

Practical implications

The main practical implication is to create awareness among managers about various costs and benefits of the proposed six sources of innovations and their effects on brand equity. Managers would be able to prioritize their sources of innovation based on firms’ current needs, and whether to focus on lower costs or building higher brand equity in the scarce resource environment.

Originality/value

We offer a comprehensive list of six sources of innovation, build a conceptual framework wherein we discuss the relative strengths of these sources affecting brand equity.

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Christine Domegan, Patricia McHugh, Brian Joseph Biroscak, Carol Bryant and Tanja Calis

The purpose of this paper is to show how non-linear causal modelling knowledge, already accumulated by other disciplines, is central to unravelling wicked problem scoping…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how non-linear causal modelling knowledge, already accumulated by other disciplines, is central to unravelling wicked problem scoping and definition in social marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an illustrative case study approach, highlighting three real-world exemplars of causal modelling for wicked problem definition.

Findings

The findings show how the traditional linear research methods of social marketing are not sensitive enough to the dynamics and complexities of wicked problems. A shift to non-linear causal modelling techniques and methods, using interaction as the unit of analysis, provides insight and understanding into the chains of causal dependencies underlying social marketing problems.

Research limitations/implications

This research extends the application of systems thinking in social marketing through the illustration of three non-linear causal modelling techniques, namely, collective intelligence, fuzzy cognitive mapping and system dynamics modelling. Each technique has the capacity to visualise structural and behavioural properties of complex systems and identify the central interactions driving behaviour.

Practical implications

Non-linear causal modelling methods provide a robust platform for practical manifestations of collaborative-based strategic projects in social marketing, when used with participatory research, suitable for micro, meso, macro or systems wide interventions.

Originality/value

The paper identifies non-linear causality as central to wicked problem scoping identification, documentation and analysis in social marketing. This paper advances multi-causal knowledge in the social marketing paradigm by using fuzzy, collective and interpretative methods as a bridge between linear and non-linear causality in wicked problem research.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Nizar Souiden

Despite the differences among Arab markets (e.g. market size, per capita income, etc.), the existence of numerous important commonalities among the region’s consumers may…

Abstract

Despite the differences among Arab markets (e.g. market size, per capita income, etc.), the existence of numerous important commonalities among the region’s consumers may encourage marketers to adopt across the region’s countries a more integrated marketing strategy based on the principle of market segmentation. For that purpose, the present article proposes a conceptual framework of international market segmentation. The conceptual framework is then tested and supported by empirical research. The results show the existence of a number of thriving consumer segments that transcend national boundaries and which share similar needs and preferences. The findings indicate that in order to approach Arab markets with more efficient marketing strategies, multinationals are requested to standardize their marketing plans to each segment while differentiating their strategies among the different segments. By applying such an approach, the decision maker will be able to identify the relevant marketing variables that may affect consumer decisions and hence know what he must do in order to cater to selected market segments.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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