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Article

Machiel J. Reinders, Marija Banovi´, Lluis Guerrero and Athanasios Krystallis

The purpose of this paper is to investigate possible cross-cultural consumer segments in the EU aquaculture market and provide direction and focus for marketing strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate possible cross-cultural consumer segments in the EU aquaculture market and provide direction and focus for marketing strategies for farmed fish products.

Design/methodology/approach

Selected psychographic constructs (i.e. category involvement, domain-specific innovativeness, subjective knowledge, suspicion of novelties and optimistic bias) are tested as segmentation basis with the objective of defining a number of cross-border consumer segments with distinctive and clear-cut profiles in terms of consumer perceptions towards farmed fish.

Findings

Based on the consumer psychographic profiles, three distinct segments are found: involved traditional, involved innovators and ambiguous indifferent, of which the first two constitute especially interesting targets for market positioning strategies for aquaculture products.

Practical implications

The results of the segmentation analysis opens new horizons in terms of positioning and differentiation of fish products from the aquaculture industry according to the most important potential market segments.

Originality/value

The current research brings insights into different pan-European consumer segments and their characteristics that allow for a corresponding differentiation strategy within the aquaculture industry. The fact that the segments tend to be uniform across all countries suggests a relatively homogeneous or converging European fish-related culture.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Machiel J. Reinders, Ruud Frambach and Mirella Kleijnen

This study aims to investigate the effects of two types of expertise (self-service technology and service type) on the disconfirmation of customers’ expectations and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of two types of expertise (self-service technology and service type) on the disconfirmation of customers’ expectations and the use-related outcomes of technology-based self-service (TBSS).

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study pertains to the mandatory use of a national public transport chip card in The Netherlands based on a sample of 267 users of this TBSS.

Findings

The findings show that technology experts experienced a less positive disconfirmation of expectations and reported less positive evaluations of the new self-service than technology novices. Technology experts also showed lower intentions to engage in positive word-of-mouth than technology novices. The evaluation of the self-service by technology novices is more positive for those that are service experts as compared to service novices, while the evaluation by technology experts is more negative for those that are service experts as compared to service novices.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides insight into how different types and levels of customer expertise affect individuals’ assessments of a TBSS upon its mandatory use.

Practical implications

For marketing managers and public policy-makers, understanding the multifaceted role of customer expertise enables more effective market segmentation and targeting, thus improving implementation of TBSS.

Originality/value

This research suggests that customers’ technology and service expertise have some counter-intuitive effects on TBSS use-related outcomes.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Jos Bartels, Machiel J. Reinders and Mariet Van Haaster- De Winter

Although awareness of environmental sustainability has increased over the past few decades, the current market share of sustainable products remains low. Because of their…

Abstract

Purpose

Although awareness of environmental sustainability has increased over the past few decades, the current market share of sustainable products remains low. Because of their market position, large-scale and high-volume consumer interactions, food retailers are appropriate venues to entice consumers to buy more sustainable foods. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which food retailers are perceived to have embedded sustainability initiatives in their marketing strategies and to have taken sustainable tactical measures on the store floor. In addition, the study considered the roles played by social identification (SI) and by perceived external prestige (PEP).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review and semi-structured qualitative interviews with the chief executive officers (CEOs) of Dutch food retailers, the authors conducted an online panel survey among the managers of these food retailers.

Findings

The results of the study show the positive impacts of managers’ SI with a sustainable consumer group and managers’ PEP on the perceived environmental sustainability initiatives of Dutch food retailers. The study finds that managers’ SIs are powerful ways to engender employee loyalty. Moreover, organisations that are perceived to have more external prestige are perceived as being more capable of developing sustainability policies.

Originality/value

The current study combines views from CEOs of large Dutch food retailers with supermarket manager’s perceptions of sustainability initiatives on a strategical and tactical level of an organisation. It uses insights from CSR, food retail and SI theory literature to explain these perceptions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Siet J. Sijtsema, Machiel J. Reinders, Sabine R.C.H. Hiller and M. Dolors Guàrdia

To better understand fruit consumption and its determinants this paper aims to explore the relationship between the consumption of different types of fruit and other…

Abstract

Purpose

To better understand fruit consumption and its determinants this paper aims to explore the relationship between the consumption of different types of fruit and other snacks and consumer taste preferences for sweet, salty and sour is explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Respondents (n=2,083) from Poland, Greece, Spain and The Netherlands filled out an online questionnaire in which the consumption of fresh fruit, sweet snacks, salty snacks, orange juice and dried fruit was measured as well as consumer self‐reported taste preferences and personal orientations towards health, convenience, price and routine behaviours.

Findings

A total of 29 percent of the total sample preferred salty tastes, whereas 21 percent preferred sweet tastes; 1 percent preferred sour tastes, and 39 percent indicated no preference. In contrast with the expectation that people who preferred sweet tastes consume more fruits and fruit products, the results imply that consumers with a sour taste preference consume more fruits and fruit products. In addition, consumers with a sour taste preference seem to be less convenience‐oriented and have more routine behaviours with regard to fruit. In contrast, consumers with a sweet taste preference eat more chocolate bars and are more convenience‐oriented.

Research limitations/implications

The self‐reported measurement of taste preferences requires further justification to be used as a measurement instrument, e.g. formulation of the items, different cultures and linkage with preferences based on sensory testing.

Practical implications

These findings show that the sweet tooth hypothesis is much more complicated if we consider not only consumption, but also self‐reported taste preferences.

Originality/value

The paper explores self‐reported taste preferences, the sweet tooth hypotheses and fruit consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Emily P. Bouwman, Marleen C. Onwezen, Danny Taufik, David de Buisonjé and Amber Ronteltap

Self-efficacy has often been found to play a significant role in healthy dietary behaviours. However, self-efficacy interventions most often consist of intensive…

Abstract

Purpose

Self-efficacy has often been found to play a significant role in healthy dietary behaviours. However, self-efficacy interventions most often consist of intensive interventions. The authors aim to provide more insight into the effect of brief self-efficacy interventions on healthy dietary behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present article, two randomized controlled trials are described. In study 1, a brief self-efficacy intervention with multiple self-efficacy techniques integrated on a flyer is tested, and in study 2, an online brief self-efficacy intervention with a single self-efficacy technique is tested.

Findings

The results show that a brief self-efficacy intervention can directly increase vegetable intake and indirectly improve compliance to a diet plan to eat healthier.

Originality/value

These findings suggest that self-efficacy interventions do not always have to be intensive to change dietary behaviours and that brief self-efficacy interventions can also lead to more healthy dietary behaviours.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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