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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Mandi Goodsett

Purpose – Research shows that new graduates of Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) programs often fail to understand and appreciate the connection between…

Abstract

Purpose – Research shows that new graduates of Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) programs often fail to understand and appreciate the connection between library science theory and practice. In other fields, culminating experiences often serve the function of combining theory and praxis for students. While notably different from the current structure of the MLIS curriculum, other disciplines provide a model for how the culminating experience component of a degree program can be facilitated successfully. This chapter examines the culminating experiences of other fields in order to provide guidance for how American Library Association-accredited MLIS programs could adopt or integrate similar programs.

Approach – The study explores four culminating experiences commonly used in other fields: fieldwork, apprenticeships and residencies, service-learning, and creative exhibitions. For each culminating experience, recommendations for potential applications to MLIS curricula are provided.

Findings – Culminating MLIS experiences that bring students into the communities they will serve – for example, fieldwork, residencies, and service-learning – may better prepare them for the new world they will face as LIS professionals and may better introduce them to the experiences of their patrons. Exploration of these alternative culminating experiences may help students bridge the gap between theory and practice during and beyond their MLIS degree programs.

Originality/Value – A thorough literature review revealed no similar examination of culminating experiences in MLIS programs’ curricula in particular. Combined with other studies that make recommendations for updating the MLIS curriculum, this exploratory study can serve as a useful resource for MLIS programs hoping to redesign their curricula.

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Sultan Al‐Daihani

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of master of library and information science (MLIS) students of social software.

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1307

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of master of library and information science (MLIS) students of social software.

Design/methodology/approach

A web‐based questionnaire is used as a survey instrument. The MLIS students at Kuwait University (KU) and the University of Wisconsin‐Milwaukee (UWM) are identified as the population of this study. In total, 132 MLIS students participate in the survey.

Findings

The majority of students from the two schools are aware of social software applications and their use. Blogs, video sharing, collaborative authoring, communication and social networking received the highest mean scores. Their perceptions about online activities, their use of social software and the obstacles to its use were not significantly affected by institutional affiliation. It was further found that the institutional affiliation exhibited significant differences for their perceptions of social software applications in education.

Research limitations/implications

The sample issues present one of the main limitations of this study and the bias of the survey method.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can meaningfully contribute to a better understanding of the affect of social software on MLIS students. It also can be applied to the implementation of these applications in library and information science (LIS) education.

Originality/value

Most research on social software concentrates on students from other fields; very little research has considered student in LIS. This research is also the first survey to investigate how MLIS students in Kuwait using social software.

Details

Library Review, vol. 59 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Charla Chebl and Maroun El Rayess

This research paper aims to present a specific outline of the library decision makers’ perceptions and the hiring patterns and acceptability of online library science…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to present a specific outline of the library decision makers’ perceptions and the hiring patterns and acceptability of online library science degree holders in academic libraries across the Arab world. It also investigates whether such degrees compare favorably with traditional degrees or not.

Design/methodology/approach

This study data were collected using an online questionnaire, which was sent out to 74 library managers in academic libraries across the Arab world. The libraries were selected from the QS stars Worldwide University Ranking for the Arab Region 2015, which ranks the Arab world’s top 100 universities.

Findings

The findings reveal no significant relationship between the hiring decision of library managers and the degree type, whether earned through traditional education or online. The analysis notes different factors influencing the hiring practices and acceptability of online library science degree holders, the most influential factors being candidate skills, accreditation of programs and candidate experiences.

Originality/value

To date, no study has investigated whether employers in academic libraries across the Arab world perceive online library science graduate degrees “less than” or “equal to” those obtained through traditional education. This study will contribute to the literature on the acceptance of online degrees in general and in the library science field in particular. The study is a significant contribution to knowledge for students, job seekers and employers alike.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Caitlin McClurg and Rhiannon Jones

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introductory exploration of how the modern Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) may contribute to the…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introductory exploration of how the modern Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) may contribute to the effect of imposter phenomenon (IP) in graduate students and early career librarians and to offer solutions to mitigate the effect.

Design/Methodology/Approach – Six university American Library Association-accredited library master’s programs in North America were identified and compared based on publicly available information on program websites. The authors pose questions about the modern MLIS and identify potential solutions to the issues raised about IP in graduate school and the workplace. Ideas in the chapter are supported by best practices suggested by academic literature on organizational behavior and Library and Information Studies (LIS) scholarship as well as invaluable personal reflections found on blogs and other gray literature sources.

Findings – The modern MLIS produces graduates who can vary greatly in their knowledge of LIS topics and career preparedness. MLIS programs and employers can mitigate the effects of nervousness, burn out, and isolation for high-achieving individuals through career preparedness and continuing education courses and opportunities for positive onboarding and mentorship.

Originality/Value – To date, there is a gap in the LIS literature about IP, especially the connection between the modern MLIS and IP. This chapter provides an exploratory look and asks questions to further the conversation on this topic.

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Lynn C. Warner

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the ways in which bachelor’s degree programs in library and information studies can support and enhance Master of…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the ways in which bachelor’s degree programs in library and information studies can support and enhance Master of Library Science (MLS) and Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) programs.

Approach – The history of undergraduate library degrees is examined, followed by a brief discussion of the current landscape of library education. Finally, five ways in which library and information science (LIS) undergraduate programs can revitalize the MLS/MLIS are addressed and analyzed.

Findings – Bachelor of Science in Library Science degrees can impact the MLS/MLIS degree in five discrete ways. Undergraduate programs can interest student in future information work, allow for more specialization in graduate programs, allow paraprofessionals to advance their library education, support rural libraries, and can lead to more rigorous MLS/MLIS curricula.

Value – As libraries and library education are in transition, undergraduate LIS degree programs have the potential to transform LIS education as a whole.

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Breanne Erin Crumpton and Emily Porter-Fyke

The aim of this paper is to examine the versatility of the MLIS degree through the lens of special libraries in terms of education, core competencies and benefits. Special…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the versatility of the MLIS degree through the lens of special libraries in terms of education, core competencies and benefits. Special libraries show the value of the Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) degree in preparing professionals to work across institutional boundaries in non-library and non-educational organizations and bring their services to the populace in sometimes unexpected places.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first conducted a literature review of special librarians and their skillsets, as well as how to properly define “special library”. They then examined different MLIS programs geared toward special libraries and how library schools prepare special librarians to benefit their organizations.

Findings

The conclusion drawn is that possession of an MLIS degree lends a special librarian more credence in the execution of their duties because they have been educated in how to best benefit their institution. While additional subject expertise is an advantage to the special librarian, the skills learned in MLIS degree programs provide an essential foundation.

Originality/value

This is a collaborative view that brings together outside research regarding various types of special libraries and the librarians that work in them in an effort to illustrate the value of the MLIS degree in an original way.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Renee F. Hill and Meagan M. McGrath

Purpose – The United States has and will continue to experience increasing levels of diversity in all segments of the population. To address the information needs of…

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Purpose – The United States has and will continue to experience increasing levels of diversity in all segments of the population. To address the information needs of diverse students, it is important for school library certification programs to offer a curriculum that addresses such topics as the role of culturally competent library service for diverse K-12 student patrons as well as teaching future school librarians how to provide services and programs that include all members of the school community, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students.

Design – We use a combination of a literature review, an explanation of the tenets of cultural competence, and relevant descriptions of experiences of LGBT youth to generate practical solutions for transforming the curriculum and culture in Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) programs with the goal of better serving LGBT patrons in secondary schools.

Findings – Twelve specific solutions were identified that focus on transforming the curricular and cultural landscape of MLIS programs as they relate to promoting diversity and inclusivity in preparing school librarians to serve LGBT students.

Value – The chapter ultimately emphasizes the unfortunate outcome resulting from MLIS programs failing to prepare school librarians who are aware of the importance of embracing and demonstrating culturally competent and inclusive services for LGBT students. It also shares strategies for improving curricular practices that affect the culture of MLIS programs and, by extension, the atmosphere in school library programs.

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-884-8

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2017

Karen Miller

This chapter explores differences in fringe, distant, and remote rural public library assets for asset-based community development (ABCD) and the relationships of those…

Abstract

This chapter explores differences in fringe, distant, and remote rural public library assets for asset-based community development (ABCD) and the relationships of those assets to geographic regions, governance structures, and demographics.

The author analyzes 2013 data from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and U.S. Department of Agriculture using nonparametric statistics and data mining random forest supervised classification algorithms.

There are statistically significant differences between fringe, distant, and remote library assets. Unexpectedly, median per capita outlets (along with service hours and staff) increase as distances from urban areas increase. The Southeast region ranks high in unemployment and poverty and low in median household income, which aligns with the Southeast’s low median per capita library expenditures, staff, hours, inventory, and programs. However, the Southeast’s relatively high percentage of rural libraries with at least one staff member with a Master of Library and Information Science promises future asset growth in those libraries. State and federal contributions to Alaska libraries propelled the remote Far West to the number one ranking in median per capita staff, inventory, and programs.

This study is based on IMLS library system-wide data and does not include rural library branches operated by nonrural central libraries.

State and federal contributions to rural libraries increase economic, cultural, and social capital creation in the most remote communities. On a per capita basis, economic capital from state and federal agencies assists small, remote rural libraries in providing infrastructure and services that are more closely aligned with libraries in more populated areas and increases library assets available for ABCD initiatives in otherwise underserved communities.

Even the smallest rural library can contribute to ABCD initiatives by connecting their communities to outside resources and creating new economic, cultural, and social assets.

Analyzing rural public library assets within their geographic, political, and demographic contexts highlights their potential contributions to ABCD initiatives.

Details

Rural and Small Public Libraries: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-112-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Judith Broady‐Preston and Shannon Bell

Recent rapid changes in the LIS profession have forced realignment of organisational structures. Professional staff are no longer guaranteed opportunities for advancement…

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1000

Abstract

Recent rapid changes in the LIS profession have forced realignment of organisational structures. Professional staff are no longer guaranteed opportunities for advancement, and the rate at which career plateaux are attained within LIS is accelerating. LIS professionals must, therefore, be proactive in seeking out continuing professional development. The Management of Library and Information Services programme offered via distance learning at the University of Wales Aberystwyth is the solution for many professionals to acquire both the skills and the academic credentials necessary to compete in the changing LIS marketplace.

Details

New Library World, vol. 102 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Philip Bradley White

This paper aims to discuss the value of the Master of Library and Information Science degree from the perspective of a recent graduate and practicing academic librarian.

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476

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the value of the Master of Library and Information Science degree from the perspective of a recent graduate and practicing academic librarian.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a viewpoint supported by current literature and practical experience.

Findings

The author presents ideas for integrating theory into skills-based education and advocates for greater emphasis on technical skill development in Library and Information Science (LIS) education.

Practical implications

LIS educators may benefit from a recent graduate’s evaluation of LIS education because it relates to hireability and job performance.

Originality/value

The paper represents the author’s points of view.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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