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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Lisa Emslie and Richard Bent

The economic and social importance of minority ethnic‐owned businesses (MEBs) is widely recognised, but it is also well‐known that the providers of business support…

Abstract

Purpose

The economic and social importance of minority ethnic‐owned businesses (MEBs) is widely recognised, but it is also well‐known that the providers of business support services have so far fallen short of the ideal in identifying, targeting and communicating with MEBs. This study seeks to add to the very limited academic literature on the topic by investigating the application of marketing principles to the task, in Scotland.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for interpretation were collected by six semi‐structured in‐depth interviews with public‐sector business‐support providers in Edinburgh and Glasgow.

Findings

Providers are aware of the lack of awareness among MEBs of the services available, and the consequent poor take‐up rates. Some have made limited efforts to initiate change by beginning to differentiate their products and services, and market them proactively, but others still favour a generic approach. A constraint on further progress is the lack of useful databases.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small‐scale exploratory study. It would be useful to use its tentative findings as the departure point for broader‐based studies, especially where MEBs are more numerous.

Practical implications

The findings contain lessons for academic researchers and marketing practitioners with an interest in ethnic minorities. Various “differentiated” marketing strategies are discussed, and promotional strategies for targeting the owners and operators of MEBs.

Originality/value

This study adds significantly to the published body of knowledge. Its findings are potentially applicable in the wider context of non‐profit, public‐sector and services marketing.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Macid Ayhan Melekoğlu

As a result of human right movements, the importance of special needs of individuals with disabilities has become more prominent in many countries in the world. Hence…

Abstract

As a result of human right movements, the importance of special needs of individuals with disabilities has become more prominent in many countries in the world. Hence, endeavors of people with disabilities, their family members, and advocates to seek accessible communities and equal opportunities for education, as well as, job placement have been widely accepted as human rights for individuals with disabilities. Consequently, establishing barrier-free environments and inclusive societies for people with disabilities have become important indicators of social development of countries. Besides, since education is considered as a fundamental human right, the importance of providing special education for children with disabilities has been recently realized by many nations (United Nations. (2006). World programme of action concerning disabled persons. New York, NY: United Nations). Turkey is one of those countries that have quite recently started to invest in special education services for its citizens with disabilities. This chapter focuses on the development, as well as the current state of special education in Turkey. Included in this development are the following sections: origins of Turkish special education, prevalence and incident rates, trends in laws and regulations, educational interventions, working with families, teacher preparation, progress that has been made, and special education challenges that exist.

Details

Special Education International Perspectives: Practices Across the Globe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-096-4

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Donnie Adams, Ashley Ng Yoon Mooi and Vasu Muniandy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the Malaysian National Professional Qualification for Educational Leaders (NPQEL), a principal leadership preparation programme and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the Malaysian National Professional Qualification for Educational Leaders (NPQEL), a principal leadership preparation programme and the Malaysian Education Blueprint 2013–2025, a comprehensive plan for a rapid and sustainable transformation of our education system through to 2025 to ensure high-performing school leaders in every school.

Design/methodology/approach

In understanding how the NPQEL operates and its effectiveness in preparing high performing school leaders, a research instrument of open-ended questions were administered to 102 principals from government-funded secondary schools, to establish how they were prepared for their leadership roles and their views of their leadership practices.

Findings

The NPQEL programme provides evidence of strong outcomes in preparing school leaders towards high-performing school leadership in Malaysia in combination of a variety of approaches with respect to its designs and competency standards. Findings indicate that the NPQEL contributes towards the development of the school leaders' attributes or skills for their leadership roles; and the NPQEL fulfils the aspirations set out in the Malaysian Education Blueprint 2013–2025.

Originality/value

This paper explores the potential influence of Malaysian NPQEL and the Malaysian Education Blueprint 2013–2025 on preparing high-performing school leaders in every school.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Mervi Luonila and Maarit Kinnunen

To make sense of the relationship between the festival attendance and the aims in arts festival management, the purpose of this paper is to explore the key characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

To make sense of the relationship between the festival attendance and the aims in arts festival management, the purpose of this paper is to explore the key characteristics for success and analyze the perceptions of the future in arts festival productions.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study uses interviews with festival managers and empathy-based stories (MEBS) written by members of festival audience. Discourse analysis is employed for answering the questions: What are the characteristics of a successful festival, and what could ruin it?

Findings

The paper highlights the importance of interaction with the audience orchestrated by the festival organization. Such interaction co-constructs a more holistic festival experience valued by both parties, which supports the sustainability and future success.

Research limitations/implications

The research data are limited to one country, and music festivals dominate the data.

Practical implications

Among managers, there is a need to consider audiences as consumers and as producers in the current competitive climate in the arts and cultural field and clarify the role of the audience as a partner in the networked festival production by placing the attendee at the core of the strategic planning process of arts festivals.

Originality/value

The research combines the views of the demand-and-supply side. It adds to the knowledge in arts and festival management by exploring the relationship between attendance and the aims of arts festival management in general, and the key characteristics of success in the arts festival context in particular. MEBS offers new interesting opportunities for future research in qualitative festival research.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Susanna Kultalahti and Riitta Viitala

The purpose of this qualitative paper is to seek more understanding of the elements important to the psychological contracts of working Millennials. The study also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this qualitative paper is to seek more understanding of the elements important to the psychological contracts of working Millennials. The study also presents the implications of those findings for human resource management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected from Facebook using the method of empathy-based stories (MEBS). A sample of working Millennials describes the factors they saw as motivating and desirable in working life.

Findings

The findings are in line with previous quantitative studies in western countries, which reveal constant learning and developing at work; interesting, challenging, and varied tasks; social relations and the supervisor’s behaviour; reciprocal flexibility concerning timetables and working hours; and a good work-life balance to be important factors. However, the findings indicate that the desire to develop competences, and factors related to time may be even more significant for Millennials than previous literature on psychological contracts has suggested. Neither monetary issues nor a desire for long-term contracts emerged clearly as important factors from the material, showing that the manifestations of some elements that are important in the formulation of the psychological contract vary in different contexts.

Practical implications

The findings of this study indicate that employing Millennials challenges HR professionals to develop HR practices that offer flexible time structures, systematic and individual development procedures, and a coaching form of leadership.

Originality/value

The paper exhibits a methodological innovation in using Facebook as a vehicle for data gathering. Additionally it applies the MEBS: a method still rare in research in the field of business.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Susanna Kultalahti and Riitta Liisa Viitala

The purpose of this paper is to examine some perceptions of Millennials concerning what makes work motivating, and discuss their implications for human resource management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine some perceptions of Millennials concerning what makes work motivating, and discuss their implications for human resource management (HRM) practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected via Facebook using the method of empathy-based stories (MEBS). The theoretical framework is grounded in the literature on motivation.

Findings

The full-time working Millennials wrote more about intrinsic motivators than extrinsic ones. Additionally, there were several dichotomies of positive and negative factors causing motivation/demotivation. Thus, the results contradict to some extent with the ones of Herzberg's. The stories revealed that the most important things having an effect on motivation were an interesting, varying and flexible job and good relationships with colleagues and supervisor.

Practical implications

The results revealed some particular factors that should be considered when designing HRM practices to dovetail with the motivational drivers of the Millennials: flexibility, work-life balance, convenient social relationships, need for coaching-based leadership and the opportunity to develop.

Social implications

Due to retirements and shrinking generations, the impact of Generation Y is increasing in the workforce. Thus, recognising its motivational factors is important.

Originality/value

The originality of the study partly rests in its methodological innovativeness. Often adopted by sociologists, this study introduces the method of MEBS to the business field. Furthermore, Facebook is still seldom used in data gathering. While much of the extant research on Generation Y is quantitative in nature, the adoption of a qualitative approach allows for the voice of Generation Y to be heard.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Tony Bush and Ashley Yoon Mooi Ng

The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the findings from research on the relationship between leadership theory and policy reform in Malaysia. Distributed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the findings from research on the relationship between leadership theory and policy reform in Malaysia. Distributed leadership is normatively preferred in the Malaysia Education Blueprint (MEB), the country’s major policy reform document. The research was conducted in two dissimilar Malaysian states (Selangor and Sarawak).

Design/methodology/approach

The research was a multiple case-study design, with 14 schools (seven in each state). Sampling was purposive, with schools selected from the different bands used to categorise school performance in Malaysia. Within each school, interviews were conducted with principals (secondary schools), headteachers (primary schools) and a range of teachers, middle leaders and senior leaders, to achieve respondent triangulation.

Findings

The findings confirm that the MEB prescribes distributed leadership as part of a strategy to move principals and head teachers away from their traditional administrative leadership styles. While there were some variations, most schools adopted a modified distributed leadership approach. Instead of the emergent model discussed and advocated in the literature, these schools embraced an allocative model, with principals sharing responsibilities with senior leaders in a manner that was often indistinguishable from delegation.

Research limitations/implications

A significant implication of the research is that policy prescriptions in major reform initiatives can lead to unintended consequences when applied in different cultural contexts. While distributed leadership is presented as “emergent” in the international (mostly western) literature, it has been captured and adapted for use in this highly centralised context, where structures and culture assume a top-down model of leadership. As a result, distributed leadership has taken on a different meaning, to fit the dominant culture.

Practical implications

The main practical implication is that principals and head teachers are more likely to enact leadership in ways which are congruent with their cultural backgrounds and assumptions than to embrace policy prescriptions, even when unproblematic adoption of policy might be expected, as in this centralised context.

Social implications

The main social implications are that policy change is dependent on socio-cultural considerations and that reform will not be whole-hearted and secure if it is not congruent with the values of institutions such as schools, and the wider society which they serve.

Originality/value

The paper is significant in exploring a popular leadership model in an unfamiliar context. Beyond its importance in Malaysia, it has wider resonance for other centralised systems which have also shown interest in distributed leadership but have been unable and/or unwilling to embrace it in the ways assumed in the literature. This leads to theoretical significance because it adds to the limited body of literature which shows that allocative distributed leadership has emerged as a device for accommodating this model within centralised contexts.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2000

R. A. de Mooij

Abstract

Details

Environmental Taxation and the Double Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-848-3

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Manoj Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to explore automobile fuel efficiency policies in the presence of two externalities: a global environmental problem and international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore automobile fuel efficiency policies in the presence of two externalities: a global environmental problem and international innovation spillovers.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a simple model with two regions, the authors show that both a fuel tax and a tax on vehicles based on their fuel economy rating are needed to decentralize the first best.

Findings

If standards are used instead of taxes, the authors find that spillovers may alleviate free-riding. Under some conditions, a strict standard in one region may favor the adoption of a strict standard in the other one.

Originality/value

The authors also show that if policies are not coordinated between regions, the resulting gas taxes will be set too low and each region will use the tax on fuel rating to reduce the damage caused by foreign drivers.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Kunhui Ye, Liyin Shen and Weisheng Lu

“Competition intensity” is a factor in addressing competitiveness. The understanding on competition intensity is prerequisite to the formulation of industrial competition…

Abstract

Purpose

“Competition intensity” is a factor in addressing competitiveness. The understanding on competition intensity is prerequisite to the formulation of industrial competition policies as well as firms’ competition strategies. In the construction context, whereas competition intensity can be measured using a number of traditional approaches (e.g. competitor number, concentration), the measurement is often criticized for poor efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new model for measuring competition intensity in light of the theory of discriminant analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model is composed of predictor variables concerned with market operation as well as criterion variables that classify markets into a few predefined groups based on the values of competition intensity. Empirical data of China's local construction markets were collected to verify the proposed model.

Findings

The research findings indicate that the model can offset the drawbacks of traditional measures in the construction market.

Research limitations/implications

It is recommended using the proposed model to predict the competition trend of construction market especially when data for the traditional approaches are poor or not readily available.

Originality/value

The proposed model is a development of the literature in examining competition intensity.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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