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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Afam Ituma

Ruth Simpson is a leading scholar in management education. This paper aims to provide a succinct summary of her voluminous work on management education, with a particular…

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Abstract

Purpose

Ruth Simpson is a leading scholar in management education. This paper aims to provide a succinct summary of her voluminous work on management education, with a particular focus on her work on the relevance and benefit of the Master in Business Administration (MBA) degree, which is generally considered the flagship of business and management education.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken is a review that introduces the central themes underpinning the work of Ruth Simpson on the MBA.

Findings

The paper elevates the understanding of the skills development and related outcomes from the MBA.

Research limitations/implications

The works reviewed have implications on how to align the MBA curriculum to meet contemporary business requirements in a fast-changing world.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the key findings of Ruth Simpson’s research on the MBA and her scholarly contribution in this area. The paper also generates insights that are anticipated to stimulate management educators to further extend the field and carry it forward in the coming years.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Lynette Louw, Johan K. Bosch and Danie J.L. Venter

The primary purpose of this article is to report on the opinions and perceptions of graduates of the quality and standing of South African Masters of Business…

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2337

Abstract

The primary purpose of this article is to report on the opinions and perceptions of graduates of the quality and standing of South African Masters of Business Administration (MBA) programmes. This article seeks to assess specific outcomes of the MBA programmes offered by South African business schools; to gauge the quality of the MBA programmes of South African business schools, based on graduates’ perceptions; to extract factors relating to the MBA programme outcomes; and MBA programme quality; and to elicit the opinions of graduates on the future development of the MBA programme in South Africa. The main findings pertain to the MBA graduates’ perceptions of the outcome and quality of the MBA programme as well as the most prominent findings in respect of the open question on the future development of South African MBA programmes, from the perspective of graduates.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Graham Hubbard

The forces driving change in MBA education in Australia areanalysed and the resulting changes that are occurring are described.Reduced government funding, the emerging…

Abstract

The forces driving change in MBA education in Australia are analysed and the resulting changes that are occurring are described. Reduced government funding, the emerging globalisation of the market and increased institutional flexibility are leading to a wider choice of providers and course types. Choices regarding course length, teaching/learning methodologies, full or part‐time courses, content and costs are discussed. The potential emergence of a project‐based MBA market for corporate clients is also considered through examination of the MBA (Mt Eliza) course.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Chin‐Bun Tse

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Master of Business Administration (MBA) students' performance in handling alternative types of accounting questions in order to…

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1422

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Master of Business Administration (MBA) students' performance in handling alternative types of accounting questions in order to generate some insights for future MBA accounting module teaching and assessment design.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs two approaches: first, statistical analysis is used on a large sample of MBA students' accounting modules results on two different types of questions. Second, common problems are identified from the assessments and summarized for analysis.

Findings

There is a statistically significant difference in performance between two types of assessment methods. The difference can be logically explained from analyzing the common problems identified in MBA students' accounting assessment scripts.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides only preliminary findings for the purpose of “rethinking” of future MBA accounting module design. Further work is required to investigate the impacts of MBA students' personal characteristics, e.g. year of working experience, first degree discipline, etc. on their accounting module performance.

Practical implications

This paper provides some important practical insights that suggest that the current MBA accounting module design “may be” incorrect in terms of topic coverage, delivery schedule and expectation.

Originality/value

The paper will initiate a new debate on how future MBA accounting modules should be, and how to teach and assess it.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Tawit Sudsakorn and Fredric William Swierczek

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the management competencies required by a Master of Business Administration (MBA) graduate to succeed as a global business…

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1853

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the management competencies required by a Master of Business Administration (MBA) graduate to succeed as a global business manager in an increasingly competitive business environment in Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes the differences in management competencies of nearly 600 MBA students from 13 universities in Thailand and Hong Kong. In the questionnaire, the MBA students are asked to indicate the levels of the management competencies which they have gained from studying the MBA program.

Findings

The findings indicate that the work competency of the Hong Kong MBA students is significantly higher than the Thai MBA students. The levels of interpersonal competency do not, however, differ significantly between the Thai and Hong Kong students. The findings also show that there are significant relationships between the background variables, e.g. job title and cultural values – namely individual success and social power – and work and interpersonal competencies.

Practical implications

To improve the value of the MBA programs in Thailand, business schools will need to put more emphasis on the work competencies in their curricula. More workshops that actively stimulate work competencies must be emphasized in the Thai MBA programs.

Originality/value

The study of management competencies in Asia representing Thailand and Hong Kong is rare. New management development approaches are proposed for business schools to train their business students to become world‐class global managers.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Robert A. Page and Kirsten A. Collins

The purpose of this paper is to review and categorize the different strategies Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs have adopted towards incorporating…

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2522

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and categorize the different strategies Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs have adopted towards incorporating environmental sustainability into business administration.

Design/methodology/approach

Through extensive internet research looking at colleges and universities, data are collected from primary source web sites and administrative school contacts. There are 35 institutions whose MBA programs address sustainability in some way. Each of these institutions is then organized by location, tuition cost, enrollment, year founded, accreditation, and curriculum.

Findings

Green educational strategies differentiate themselves by the size and maturity of the program. Larger, established institutions typically opt for the green major, or a dual degree, and tend to leave systematic integration of sustainability to the individual student. Newer and smaller entrants tend to either dabble in green with a few sustainability courses, or completely embrace and systemically integrate sustainability throughout the program.

Research limitations/implications

The sample focuses on US institutions and treats sustainability as an externally validated curricular choice when it may merely be an educational fad. The sample excludes potential green MBA programs that lack a strong internet presence.

Practical implications

Four archetypes are identified: dual degree, all‐green, green major, and green coursework. Institutions can analyze their performances and see where they fall on the two major continua – integration and maturity/size.

Originality/value

Green MBA programs are relatively new on the academic landscape, and this research paper is one of the first to systematically analyze and categorize them.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Tadao Kagono

One of the characteristics of the Japanese management education has been the near absence of domestic MBA programmes on the one hand and the prevalence of in‐company…

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1753

Abstract

One of the characteristics of the Japanese management education has been the near absence of domestic MBA programmes on the one hand and the prevalence of in‐company education on the other. Yet many large companies have increasingly been sending their employees to overseas MBA programmes. The sudden emergence of part‐time MBA programmes in the late 1980s, which might have appeared to go some way to addressing this seeming paradox, has not in fact been the answer, since the benefits the businesses seek from the overseas MBA programmes are those which the domestic MBA programmes cannot provide. There is also a big gap between the aspirations of the MBAs and the corporate HRM reality. Examines the reasons behind the recent development, and explores the more general issues which the domestic MBA education is likely to encounter for some time, through the findings of the recent research and the experience of the Kobe University in this area.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2016

Abdullah Abonamah, Sophia Korayim and Llewellyn D. W. Thomas

This chapter presents through a case study detailed concrete experiences of the implementation of an entrepreneurship-focused MBA within the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter presents through a case study detailed concrete experiences of the implementation of an entrepreneurship-focused MBA within the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Methodology/approach

Review of the UAE context, the formation of Abu Dhabi School of Management, the development of its MBA program and components, and the impact to date of the MBA program. An analysis of the challenges associated with the design and delivery of the MBA program is also presented.

Findings

Launching an entrepreneurship-specific MBA in an emerging market based upon an existing world-class entrepreneurship MBA program is feasible and desirable. Specific cultural norms and practices need to be taken into account to ensure that the program and its delivery are fit for the local country.

Originality/value

Provides insight into specific MBA program attributes that need to be customized for the UAE, including assessment, case study use, and delivery format. Furthermore, it also emphasizes the importance of having local faculty for effective program delivery and the risks of, and approaches to, using international faculty who are not based in the country of delivery.

Details

Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-068-8

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2018

Paul Christopher Manning

The purpose of this chapter is to develop a deeper understanding of the CSR perspectives of MBA in the European context. The chapter will review literature from the USA…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to develop a deeper understanding of the CSR perspectives of MBA in the European context. The chapter will review literature from the USA and Europe focused on business school ethics and the CSR. The chapter will then present the findings generated from research into MBA students’ ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR) from a European business school research site.

Design/methodology/approach

This was inductive research that used qualitative, semi-structured interviews, along with other qualitative techniques, to collect data. The research population was purposely selected from two cohorts of MBA students, one comprising P/T, the other F/T students.

Findings

The research confirmed that there are broad similarities between the USA and Europe, in terms of students’ experiences of business school scholarship and pedagogy. The research also confirmed, however, that these European-based students wanted a greater focus on CSR, for instance in terms of addressing the relationship between business and the environment, which students do not consider is adequately addressed in their programmes. Furthermore, and reflecting US experience, students reported at the completion of the MBA that they were conscious that they had become more focused on their individual ‘rational’ self-interest, with the goal of increasing their own material success. Not all of these students were content with this change, but they reported that it had been embedded within them, as a consequence of studying for an MBA.

Social implications

US-based research and this example from the European context both point to the conclusion that there is dominant instrumental paradigm in HE business and management pedagogy. This paradigm needs to be challenged to restore society’s ethical and CSR expectations, and also to facilitate the moral education of more socially responsible MBA graduate managers. The research confirmed that students are very much in favour of CSR framed changes to the MBA programme.

Originality/value

This chapter contributes to a developing research stream into MBA programmes and CSR in a European context.

Details

The Critical State of Corporate Social Responsibility in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-149-6

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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Gazi Mahabubul Alam, Morsheda Parvin, Ahmad Fauzi Bin Mohd Ayub, Romana Kader and Md. Mahfuzur Rahman

An old saying –“Jack of all trades, master of none”– deliberately asserts that the purpose of a master’s degree program is to generate high level job skills in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

An old saying –“Jack of all trades, master of none”– deliberately asserts that the purpose of a master’s degree program is to generate high level job skills in order to improve a nation's economy, while a bachelor degree produces economically productive graduates. Employment of such graduates is fundamentally important for personal and economic development. There is a link between a bachelor’s and master's degree and how these qualifications are linked to the job market. Both horizontal and vertical mismatches are developed which is the central focus of this research.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the differentiated nature of research questions, multiple techniques are used to collect the data. However, this research bears the norms of the qualitative method. Both secondary and primary data are used, and meanwhile secondary data are collected by the banks, Bangladesh Bureau of Educational Information and Statistics (BANBEIS), University Grants Commission (UGC) and by the institutions sampled. Primary data are gathered from interviews with key people. Data were collected from three institutions of higher education and from six commercial banks and from the Central Bank. The academic results of 21,325 MBA graduates and education backgrounds of 750 executives working in banks served as the basis for establishing our arguments.

Findings

This study discovers that MBA graduates who have studied science subjects achieved much better grades in the MBA compared to their counterparts who studied business from secondary provision to first degree. The market-driven MBA programme has become a “business product”. The major revenue of higher education institutions comes from enrolment in MBA courses. For this reason, a science-friendly MBA program is developed to generate more business. If this continues, the philosophy of the master's program would either be lost or will have to be redefined in the 21st century.

Originality/value

While a few studies have investigated the area of HE in Bangladesh, none covers the impact of MBA degrees on the job market and its contribution to enhancing job skills.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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