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Article

Sandra Walklate, Barry Godfrey and Jane Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon the challenges posed for the ongoing implementation of multi-agency risk assessment conferences (MARACs) for police forces in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon the challenges posed for the ongoing implementation of multi-agency risk assessment conferences (MARACs) for police forces in England and Wales during the 2020 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

This is rapid response research involving qualitative methods primarily online semi-structured interviewing with a sample of police domestic abuse leads in England and Wales.

Findings

The findings point to increased use of virtual platforms particularly for MARACs and that this has beneficial consequences both for the police and in their view also for victim-survivors.

Research limitations/implications

The findings reported here are from policing domestic abuse leads. More work needs to be done to explore the value of engaging in virtual MARACs for all the agencies concerned but also whether MARACs continue to be the best way to ensure the victim-survivor is kept in view.

Practical implications

The use of virtual platforms carries a range of practice implications for the future of MARACs for the foreseeable future. These range from ensuring attendance of the appropriate agencies to the range and frequency of meetings, to infrastructural support for all agencies to engage.

Originality/value

This is an original study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council examining police and court responses to domestic abuse during the covid-19 pandemic.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article

Rachel Robbins, Hugh McLaughlin, Concetta Banks, Claire Bellamy and Debbie Thackray

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the potential and limits of the Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs) in supporting adults with social care…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the potential and limits of the Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs) in supporting adults with social care needs who also experience domestic violence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on a scoping review as part of a wider research project entitled: to identify and assess the effectiveness of social care's contribution to the development of MARAC and the protection of adults facing domestic violence.

Findings

An understanding of the workings of MARAC could support social care practice with high-risk victims of domestic violence. However, the conception of risk assessment and management central to the process also poses ethical dilemmas for practitioners.

Practical implications

Social care is ideally placed to support, in an holistic manner, a group of vulnerable service-users with complex needs. However, the current climate of austerity could jeopardise this work.

Originality/value

There is little in the professional and academic press on the MARAC process and particularly in relation to adults and older people. This paper alerts the practice community to the process, its historical development and characteristics and implications for practice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article

Annamarie C. Klose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the Spring 2013 MARAC Conference.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the Spring 2013 MARAC Conference.

Design/methodology/approach

This report focuses on the use of technology in archives, libraries, and museums, as presented in various sessions at the Spring 2013 MARAC Conference.

Findings

Archives, libraries, and museums are utilizing various technologies including QR codes, data visualization, open‐source platforms, and single search boxes to better reach and serve the demands and expectations of today's users.

Originality/value

The paper condenses the author's notes from various sessions.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article

Annamarie Klose Hrubes

– The purpose of this paper is to report on the Fall 2015 MARAC Conference.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the Fall 2015 MARAC Conference.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper focuses on the use of technology in archives, libraries and museums, as presented in various sessions at the Fall 2015 MARAC Conference.

Findings

Archives, libraries and museums are harnessing technology to archive Twitter feeds, digitize obsolete media, provide better online access to collections, automate workflows for patron-driven requests, conduct forensic recovery of born-digital objects and manage long-term access and preservation of diverse digital collections.

Originality/value

The paper condenses the authors’ notes from various sessions.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article

Lindsay Shearlock and Paul Cambridge

This paper has been developed from discussions between the police and adult social care staff in adult protection training on joint investigations for managers and…

Abstract

This paper has been developed from discussions between the police and adult social care staff in adult protection training on joint investigations for managers and practitioners in Somerset. The role of the police in criminal investigations is examined and reviewed in the context of wider adult protection investigations. The case studies and discussion points are based on experience from adult protection investigations conducted by the East Somerset Public Protection Unit, and are used to identify key considerations for the effective planning, conduct and co‐ordination of adult protection investigations.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article

Roxanne Khan, Victoria J Willan, Michelle Lowe, Phaedra Robinson, Matthew Brooks, May Irving, Rachel Stokes, Nicola Graham-Kevan, Marta Karwacka and Jo Bryce

There is a body of evidence that suggests a range of psychosocial characteristics demarcate certain adults to be at an elevated risk for victimisation. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a body of evidence that suggests a range of psychosocial characteristics demarcate certain adults to be at an elevated risk for victimisation. The purpose of this paper is to examine consistency between one police force, and a corresponding Victim Support service based in England, in their assessment of level of risk faced by victims of violent crime.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explored matched data on 869 adult victims of violent crime gathered from these two key services in Preston, namely, Lancashire Constabulary and Victim Support, from which a sub-group of comparable “domestic violence” cases (n=211) were selected for further examination.

Findings

Data analyses revealed methodological inconsistencies in the assessment of victimisation resulting in discrepancies for recorded levels of risk in domestic violence cases across these two agencies.

Practical implications

These findings provide a compelling argument for developing a more uniformed approach to victim assessment and indicate a significant training need.

Originality/value

This paper highlights areas of good practice and forwards several recommendations for improved practice that emphasises the integration of empirical research conducted by psychologists to boost the validity and reliability of risk assessment approaches and tools used.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Article

Imogen Parry

The purpose of this paper is to identify and encourage good practice in adult safeguarding by housing providers, despite their unclear and largely unregulated role in this area.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and encourage good practice in adult safeguarding by housing providers, despite their unclear and largely unregulated role in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature search on policy and research on the role of housing in adult safeguarding. Good practice search, drawn from No Secrets consultation responses and more recently, from other housing providers.

Findings

Despite the current weak incentives for housing providers to engage in adult safeguarding, some have done so effectively, overcoming barriers to joint working.

Research limitations/implications

This is not a comprehensive study of all good practice in this area; much will exist “unsung” and unrecognised.

Practical implications

Increase housing providers' involvement in adult safeguarding.

Originality/value

The paper is of value, as there is a dearth of literature on the role and potential of housing and adult safeguarding.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Book part

Ioannis N. Lagoudis

There is significant amount of literature tackling different issues related to the port industry. The present chapter focuses on a single business unit of seaports aiming…

Abstract

There is significant amount of literature tackling different issues related to the port industry. The present chapter focuses on a single business unit of seaports aiming at the documentation of works related to container terminals.

An effort to review, collect and present the majority of the works present in the last 30 years, between 1980 and 2010, has been made in order to picture the problems dealt and methods used by the authors in the specific research field. To facilitate the reader, studies have been grouped under five categories of addressed problems (productivity and competitiveness, yard and equipment utilization, equipment scheduling, berth planning, loading/unloading) and four modelling methodologies (mathematics and operations research, management and economics, simulation, stochastic modelling).

The analysis shows that most works focus on productivity and competitiveness issues followed by yard and equipment utilisation and equipment scheduling. In reference to the methodologies used managerial and economic approaches lead, followed by mathematics and operations research.

In reference to future research, two fields have been identified where there is scope of significant contribution by the academic community: container terminal security and container terminal supply chain integration.

The present chapter provides the framework for researchers in the field of port container terminals to picture the so far works in this research area and enables the identification of gaps at both research question and methodology level for further research.

Details

Maritime Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-340-8

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Article

Jeremy C. Gibson, Bill Nicol, Ed Ronayne and Michelle Grant

First, the authors summarise arrangements expected from general practice (GP) surgeries, to optimize their safeguarding adults role. Second, using case-based discussions…

Abstract

Purpose

First, the authors summarise arrangements expected from general practice (GP) surgeries, to optimize their safeguarding adults role. Second, using case-based discussions, the authors present specific safeguarding pathways (through which the authors have produced a downloadable interactive app) that the authors have developed to help Derbyshire GPs respond appropriately to safeguarding adults concerns. Third, the authors present the Derbyshire clinical commissioning Groups’ (CCG) approach to seeking assurance from their GPs that they have effective safeguarding adults arrangements in place. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have based the paper on relevant current UK legislation and national guidance, the local approach to seeking assurance from GP surgeries; the authors adjusted the pathways on the basis of feedback received from eight out of 103 (7.76 per cent response rate) Derbyshire GP safeguarding leads who responded to an e-mail containing draft pathways.

Findings

Primary care staff are ideally placed to identify safeguarding adults issues and to act to protect those who are at risk of abuse or neglect.

Originality/value

The authors are unaware of any other paper that does all of the following: summarises policies GP surgeries should implement regarding safeguarding adults; details core competencies required of GPs regarding safeguarding adults; presents how CCGs can seek assurance from GP surgeries regarding safeguarding adults; and presents straightforward pathways for specific safeguarding adults scenarios. In one paper, now published in the British Journal of General Practice, the authors presented a generic safeguarding adults pathway.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Book part

Marianne Hester

Purpose – The chapter explores transnational influences, global and local networks and organizations (governmental and nongovernmental), in the development of domestic…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter explores transnational influences, global and local networks and organizations (governmental and nongovernmental), in the development of domestic violence policy in China and England.

Approach – The frameworks of traveling theory (Said, 1984; Min, 2005) and global social policy and international relations approaches to policy transfer such as policy entrepreneurs (Stone, 2001) are used to discuss the different domestic violence policy trajectories in the two countries.

Social implications – It is shown that in China, where activism and policy development concerning domestic violence is relatively recent, global social policy and transnational alliances created via international and global meetings have enabled activists to draw on ideas and policy frameworks from outside the nation-state to develop a specifically Chinese policy agenda. In England, where there is a longer history of debate and policy development regarding domestic violence, global social policy and transnational links have more recently become important to activists and academics wanting to shift policy developments further and to place them within a framework of gendered inequality and human rights.

Findings – The chapter considers action and policy development related to domestic violence, comparing these across the very different contexts of England and China by using the ideas of traveling theory and policy networks. It is shown that use by Chinese of pressure from “within” and “at the margins” of the state has proven effective in challenging and developing domestic violence policy, while in England a combination of pressure from “outside” the state and mainstreaming has enabled activists to develop the policy agenda in positive, if fragile, ways.

Originality/values of chapter – In both China and England, there is evidence of policy entrepreneurs traveling policy ideas into the countries, where they are contested and incorporated. The particular sociopolitical contexts of women's movements and networks influence policy development across the different localities. Within the Chinese context, activists have used pressure from “within” and “at the margins” of the state to effectively challenge and develop domestic violence policy. English activists have instead used pressure from “outside” the state to develop and shape domestic violence policy in England.

Details

Social Production and Reproduction at the Interface of Public and Private Spheres
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-875-5

Keywords

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