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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2007

Paul Rouse, Martin Putterill and Z.F. LI MICHAEL

Abstract

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Handbook of Transport Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045376-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Martin Putterill, William Maguire and Amrik S. Sohal

Argues that as opportunities arise for companies to exploit new markets, a critical issue is how firms should be organized to cope with innovation and competition in a…

Abstract

Argues that as opportunities arise for companies to exploit new markets, a critical issue is how firms should be organized to cope with innovation and competition in a fast moving business environment. Suggests changes to organizational procedures with the potential to deal with complex investment decisions better. Based on theory, surveys and practice, these include changes to the traditional role of financial analysis, extending the capital investment process to one which combines strategic and financial management considerations. Puts forward a set of criteria which should be met once advanced manufacturing technology practices have been recognized.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

K.E. Maani, M.S. Putterill and D.G. Sluti

Despite a strong research output in quality in recent years, theliterature is still scant in empirical studies of commonly held qualitytheories. Empirically investigates…

Abstract

Despite a strong research output in quality in recent years, the literature is still scant in empirical studies of commonly held quality theories. Empirically investigates the operational and strategic impact of improved process quality and describes the construction of a model of process quality and its correlates in manufacturing. Using empirical data, the study performs a micro assessment of the impact of quality on operations performance. Implications for the business unit as a whole are also considered. Since the research domain of the study is manufacturing industry, the conformance dimension of quality has been adopted as a more precise and measurable definition than those followed in other research. Structural equation modelling (SEM) is used for analysing the magnitude and direction of hypothesized relationships, a rigorous and reliable way of testing multivariate data and path models. Research findings generally support the consensus view that there is a favourable impact of enhanced quality in the form of improvements in productivity, inprocess inventory, on‐time delivery, and manufacturing cost. Flow‐through effects on business performance were also noted though not in all dimensions. This research complements marketing‐oriented evaluation which has been a feature of approaches to date.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Shilpee A. Dasgupta, Damodar Suar and Seema Singh

Through the lens of social exchange theory and organisation support theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the passive, aggressive, and assertive styles of…

Abstract

Purpose

Through the lens of social exchange theory and organisation support theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the passive, aggressive, and assertive styles of managers/supervisors that influence perceived supervisory support and to test whether the support increases employees’ satisfaction with the communication of supervisors and their organisation‐based self‐esteem. It also assesses whether employees’ communication satisfaction and their self‐esteem influence employees’ performance, commitment and absenteeism.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 400 employees from ten manufacturing firms in India were studied through questionnaire survey. Standard instruments were used to assess the constructs. A scale was developed to measure the communication style of managers and a single item to assess absenteeism.

Findings

Results revealed that assertive style of communication lends maximum support to employees. Perceived supervisory support at the workplace enhances employees’ satisfaction with communication of supervisors and organisation‐based self‐esteem. Satisfaction with communication fosters a strong emotional bond with organisations and the emotional bond with organisations reduces employees’ absenteeism.

Originality/value

The paper shows that employees’ organisation‐based self‐esteem increases their job performance. Organisations can conduct training programs to develop an assertive communication style in their managers/supervisors to increase the support to subordinates; thereby its positive consequences will follow in increasing employees’ performance and commitment and reducing absenteeism.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2011

Rohit Pradhan and Robert Weech-Maldonado

Private equity has acquired multiple large nursing home chains within the past few years; by 2007, it owned 6 of the 10 largest chains. Despite widespread public and…

Abstract

Private equity has acquired multiple large nursing home chains within the past few years; by 2007, it owned 6 of the 10 largest chains. Despite widespread public and policy interest, evidence on the purported impact of private equity on nursing home performance is limited. In our review, we begin by briefly reviewing the organizational and environmental changes in the nursing home industry that facilitated private equity investments. We offer a conceptual framework to hypothesize the relationship between private equity ownership and nursing home performance. Finally, we offer a research agenda focused on the important parameters of nursing home performance: financial performance, and quality of care.

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Biennial Review of Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-714-8

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Tipparat Laohavichien, Lawrence D. Fredendall and R. Stephen Cantrell

This study aims to examine the effects of leadership behaviors on quality management (QM) practices and their effects on quality performance of manufacturing companies in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of leadership behaviors on quality management (QM) practices and their effects on quality performance of manufacturing companies in Thailand. The hypotheses were that leadership leads to infrastructure practices, which in turn support quality practices. These quality practices improve quality performance. This was tested using a structural equation model. In general, the model was supported although all of the individual practices examined here were not statistically significant.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of quality managers of firms located within Thailand was conducted and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) to determine how leadership affected quality practices which in turn affected quality performance. The interactions of leadership with infrastructure and core variables were tested and found to be insignificant.

Findings

The SEM established that leadership behaviors supported one infrastructure practice – human resource management, which in turn supported one core QM practice – statistical process control. While six dimensions of transformational and two dimensions of transactional analysis were tested, only two dimensions of transformational and one dimension of transactional leadership were retained. However, these did load onto one leadership second‐order factor. The interactions of leadership with infrastructure and core practices were not significant. The core practices significantly affected three quality performance measures – product returns, product rework and scrap levels.

Research limitations/implications

Further investigation is needed to understand how the Thai culture affects the use of quality practices. Since there was only one respondent per company, the study needs additional validation. Further investigation of the transformational and transactional leadership constructs is necessary.

Practical implications

This suggests to international managers that many of the quality techniques are useful in both developing countries and developed countries. It also suggests that transactional leadership was more effective than prior literature expected it be.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that leadership in Thailand is important to the implementation of quality practices. The findings indicate that leadership is an important component of QM and affects infrastructure practices which in turn affect core quality practices. Finally, these core practices affect quality performance. This confirms prior QM models. A major finding is the importance of the contingent punishment dimension of transactional leadership. The confirmatory factor analysis suggests that the individual dimensions of transformational and transactional leadership are not reliable as currently operationalized and further work is needed to develop reliable leadership scales.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Lawrence M. Corbett and Kate N. Rastrick

For many years culture has been claimed as an important component of organizational success in general and TQM and quality improvement in particular. This study examined…

Abstract

For many years culture has been claimed as an important component of organizational success in general and TQM and quality improvement in particular. This study examined management culture and quality performance in a sample of New Zealand manufacturing organizations. The culture was measured using the Organizational Culture Inventory, and quality performance was measured using questions from Leading the Way: A Study of Best Manufacturing Practices in Australia and New Zealand. Different management cultures were found to have correlations with quality indicators such as: warranty claims, percent defectives, ratio of quality inspectors to direct production workers, and delivery in full on time. No significant correlations were found between the organizational cultures and cost of quality, or with supplier quality. We suggest that through understanding these relationships between culture and quality, managers may be able to develop more effective and competitive organizations.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Iñaki Heras, Martí Casadesús and Gavin P.M. Dick

Registrations to the ISO 9000 standard have grown rapidly in recent years with 343,643 certificates in 150 countries at the start of 2000, a growth of 71,769 on the…

Abstract

Registrations to the ISO 9000 standard have grown rapidly in recent years with 343,643 certificates in 150 countries at the start of 2000, a growth of 71,769 on the previous year, of which 23,900 were in Europe. This suggests that there is a wide‐spread belief in the business benefits of ISO 9000 accreditation. However, failure to realise business performance improvement in practice could have a negative effect on the future credibility of quality certification and lead to ISO 9000 eventually becoming just another failed management panacea. Although there is much research describing implementation of ISO 9000 quality systems, there is little empirical research that examines whether ISO 9000 is linked to improvement in audited financial performance. This paper contributes to closing this gap in the literature by comparing the audited financial performance of 400 accredited and 400 non‐accredited Basque firms over a period of five years.

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Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Ross L. Chapman, Peter Charles Murray and Robert Mellor

Despite the increasing international evidence that has identified quality of product and service and a culture of continuous improvement to be essential for long‐term…

Abstract

Despite the increasing international evidence that has identified quality of product and service and a culture of continuous improvement to be essential for long‐term competitive advantage, many Australian firms apparently remain unconvinced of the substantial gains available through a focused commitment to quality and continuous improvement. Anecdotal evidence and limited previous research suggest that this is at least partly due to the often touted cost barrier and the failure of firms to integrate quality improvement developments with their strategic planning activities. Discusses specific outcomes of a survey of medium‐sized manufacturing and service firms in Australia. Categorizes questions relating to strategic aspects of quality and continuous improvement into five major indicator groups, related to their commitment to the integration of quality and strategic planning initiatives. Compares mean scores for these indicators to standard financial performance and productivity measures, to test the hypothesis that there is a definite link between a firm’s commitment to quality improvement and its financial and marketplace performance. Also compares individual question responses relating to continuous improvement and strategic planning to selected performance indicators in an attempt to identify quality‐improvement activities which may have a particularly influential impact on performance.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Gavin P.M. Dick

Given the rapid recent growth in ISO 9000 applications and the business performance benefits being claimed for it by National Accreditation Registrars, it is timely to…

Abstract

Given the rapid recent growth in ISO 9000 applications and the business performance benefits being claimed for it by National Accreditation Registrars, it is timely to review the research in this area to see if any substantial proof exists for these claims. The paper explores the literature and finds that there is no proven link between quality certification (ISO 9000) and improved business performance. However, it is clear from the research reviewed on business performance factors, that better quality does have a consistent, positive relationship with business performance. Combining these findings leads to the inference that quality certification to ISO 9000 standards is not consistently associated with having a quality assurance system that delivers improved process control, or better quality. We conclude that the National Accreditation Registrars need to reflect on the standards of proof that they currently use to support claims for business performance improvement from the application of the ISO 9000 standards.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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