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Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2010

Paul A. Schutz, Kelly A. Rodgers and Jacqueline Simcic

In this section, we will highlight three overlapping concepts that are currently used in both the motivation and emotion literatures: goals, agency and expectancy. We…

Abstract

In this section, we will highlight three overlapping concepts that are currently used in both the motivation and emotion literatures: goals, agency and expectancy. We recognize that there are other potential overlapping constructs (e.g. interest); however, we focus on these three.

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The Decade Ahead: Applications and Contexts of Motivation and Achievement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-254-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Frances Hultgren

With a departure point in the Schutzian concept of “The stranger”, the aim of the article is to examine the usefulness of the concept as a tool for understanding…

Abstract

Purpose

With a departure point in the Schutzian concept of “The stranger”, the aim of the article is to examine the usefulness of the concept as a tool for understanding information seeking practices from an outsider perspective in the context of leaving school and planning to apply to a university programme in Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the phenomenological sociology of Schutz together with narrative theory. In this study stories of information seeking gathered in interviews are related to a discourse of nationality and analysed using the concept of cognitive authority together with the concept of the stranger.

Findings

The findings reveal the effort required for young people with roots in other countries or from non‐academic homes to connect and interact with potentially valuable sources of information and that the concept of the stranger can be employed to render visible implicit dimensions of information seeking.

Research limitations/implications

The article is based on an in‐depth study of the information seeking activities of one young person in a specific national, political and cultural context. It is particular and personal but at the same time can be related to wider issues in contemporary society through narrative analysis. The stories of information seeking taken up exemplify the social nature of barriers of access to information and may be of help in the planning of research projects on a larger scale.

Originality/value

In a time when a discourse of nationality is pervasive and integration policies are under question in Europe this study provides insight into the individual experience from the perspective of library and information science.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

N.P. McKeganey and M.J. Bloor

Our concern in this article is with the feeding back of sociological descriptions to those whom these descriptions purport to be about. This in particular is what we mean…

Abstract

Our concern in this article is with the feeding back of sociological descriptions to those whom these descriptions purport to be about. This in particular is what we mean in our title by the ‘retrieval of sociological description’. We would like to consider here some of the issues surrounding any attempt on the part of the sociologist to offer his account for inspection by his research respondents, why one may attempt such an exercise and, tentatively, what any such exercise might look like. In particular, we wish to link such ‘feeding back’ of the sociologist's descriptions to the related issue of the validation of social research. Conventionally, validation of sociological research is thought to consist in internal methodological procedures, e.g. triangulation, random allocation, etc., but validation by respondents may represent a feasible alternative to such procedures. By respondent validation is meant here any attempt on the part of the researcher to establish a

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Abstract

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Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

Abstract

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Pedestrian Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-848-55750-5

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2010

Mary Jo Deegan

People subjectively engage in the production and reproduction of what constitutes “feeling normal.” Objective standards of normalcy for the able-bodied are created and…

Abstract

People subjectively engage in the production and reproduction of what constitutes “feeling normal.” Objective standards of normalcy for the able-bodied are created and maintained by institutions (e.g., medicine, the state, business, the mass media, and family), and these standards are learned by individuals who socialize the next generation in a continuous cycle. Having a disability does not exempt a person from standards and values of “able-bodied normalcy,” nor does it prevent her/him from reproducing these standards for future generations. Thus, it is possible, if not probable, that persons with disabilities live in and reproduce the able-bodied lifeworld, sustaining, what is for the person with a physical disability, an unattainable standard of normalcy. Approximating and ultimately achieving “normalcy” in this situation or at least the presentation of “normalcy” (Goffman, 1959, 1963) may occupy a sizeable portion of everyday life. More importantly here, “feeling normal” emerges when the social constructions of reality allows the person with a physical disability to be part of a generation and everyday life. There is, in other words, a “frame” for defining normality, and physical disability is a key to changing this frame (Goffman, 1974).

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Disability as a Fluid State
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-377-5

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Amrit Thapa, Jinusha Panigrahi and Iris BenDavid-Hadar

Does education affect economic outcomes, and if so, how? Does education finance interact with public policy? And how does education finance policy contribute to the…

Abstract

Does education affect economic outcomes, and if so, how? Does education finance interact with public policy? And how does education finance policy contribute to the development of a new strategic planning for the next generation, if at all? This chapter reviews recent conceptual and methodological developments in the field of economics and finance of education. The review covers these two major topics and is divided into three sections. First is an overview of the field, including current trends in economics of education in both developed and developing countries. This section incorporates themes such as returns to investment in education, costs of education, education and economic growth, and education market, choice, and incentives. The second section focuses on finance of education and current debates on equality, equity, and efficiency in educational finances. The third section presents summary and discussion. The discussion will bring to light the issues, challenges, opportunities, and future directions of the field. Where appropriate, examples and empirical evidence from both developing and developed countries are presented.

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Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2019
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-724-4

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Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2017

Brea L. Perry and Jessica McCrory Calarco

Only a handful of studies have examined social interactions between parents and children around food choice, though these have important implications for health. Moreover…

Abstract

Purpose

Only a handful of studies have examined social interactions between parents and children around food choice, though these have important implications for health. Moreover, we know very little about how socioeconomic status might influence these exchanges, including the nature and outcomes of children’s requests for specific foods and drinks.

Methodology/approach

Data are from a survey of 401 families with children ages 2-17. Using formal mediation models to decompose direct and indirect effects, we test three potential mechanisms of socioeconomic differences in caregivers’ propensity to indulge children’s requests for specific foods or drinks: (1) Children’s food-seeking behaviors; (2) Caregivers’ nutritional attitudes and values; and (3) Caregiver social control and monitoring of children’s diets. We also present a symbolic indulgence explanation, which is not empirically testable using our data, but is consistent with qualitative evidence (Pugh, 2009).

Findings

We find significant SES differences in the frequency and nature of children’s requests for foods, nutritional attitudes and values, and opportunities for caregiver monitoring of children’s eating habits, but these mechanisms explain little of the association between socioeconomic status and caregiver responses.

Research Limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include the non-probability sample and the inability to demonstrate the meaning and intention underlying SES effects. Nonetheless, our findings provide information about how SES does and does not influence parent-child interactions around food choice, which has important implications for developing effective policies and interventions for improving children’s diets.

Originality/value

In light of null findings regarding alternative explanations, children’s requests for unhealthy food and parents’ willingness to grant them may be related to cultural practices around parenting that differ by social class. Consequently, culture may be an important yet under-emphasized mechanism contributing to socioeconomic disparities in children’s dietary habits and health.

Details

Food Systems and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-092-3

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Muhammad Khalid Anser, Zahid Yousaf, Muhammad Usman, Seemab Yousaf, Naseem Fatima, Hadi Hussain and Junaid Waheed

The present study aims to develop a strategic business performance (SBP) model for larger firms by examining the mediating role of structural flexibility in the network…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to develop a strategic business performance (SBP) model for larger firms by examining the mediating role of structural flexibility in the network capability–SBP link, as well as testing the moderating role of entrepreneurial orientation in the relationship between structural flexibility and SBP.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 929 senior managers/owners of large textile sector firms operating in Pakistan. Regression and bootstrapping techniques were used to test the proposed relationships.

Findings

The results revealed that network capability positively shapes firms' structural flexibility, which, in turn, helps firms achieve SBP. The present work also showed that entrepreneurial orientation strengthens the positive relationship between structural flexibility and SBP.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on the cross-sectional data, and data were collected from the textile sector firms operating in Pakistan.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should focus on developing firms' network capability, which positively shapes structural flexibility and helps firms achieve SBP. Entrepreneurial orientation can also play an imperative role for strengthening the link between structural flexibility and SBP.

Originality/value

The value of the present work rests on the deeper understanding of the network capability–SBP link that it offered by examining the relationships of the network capability dimensions with SBP through structural flexibility. Moreover, by bringing to the fore firms' entrepreneurial orientation as a moderator of the structural flexibility–SBP relationship, the study provided a new vantage point to uncover the complexities involved in the links between network capability, structural flexibility, and SBP.

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

J.M. Bewley, Boehlje, A.W. Gray, H. Hogeveen, S.J. Kenyon, S.D. Eicher and M.M. Schutz

Automated body condition scoring (BCS) through extraction of information from digital images has been demonstrated to be feasible; and commercial technologies are being…

Abstract

Purpose

Automated body condition scoring (BCS) through extraction of information from digital images has been demonstrated to be feasible; and commercial technologies are being developed. The primary objective of this research was to identify the factors that influence the potential profitability of investing in an automated BCS system.

Design/methodology/approach

An expert opinion survey was conducted to provide estimates for potential improvements associated with technology adoption. A stochastic simulation model of a dairy system, designed to assist dairy producers with investment decisions for precision dairy farming technologies was utilized to perform a net present value (NPV) analysis. Benefits of technology adoption were estimated through assessment of the impact of BCS on the incidence of ketosis, milk fever, and metritis, conception rate at first service, and energy efficiency.

Findings

Improvements in reproductive performance had the largest influence on revenues followed by energy efficiency and then by disease reduction. The impact of disease reduction was less than anticipated because the ideal BCS indicated by experts resulted in a simulated increase in the proportion of cows with BCS at calving 3.50. The estimates for disease risks and conception rates, obtained from literature, however, suggested that this increase would result in increased disease incidence. Stochastic variables that had the most influence on NPV were: variable cost increases after technology adoption; the odds ratios for ketosis and milk fever incidence and conception rates at first service associated with varying BCS ranges; uncertainty of the impact of ketosis, milk fever, and metritis on days open, unrealized milk, veterinary costs, labor, and discarded milk; and the change in the percentage of cows with BCS at calving 3.25 before and after technology adoption. The deterministic inputs impacting NPV were herd size, management level, and level of milk production. Investment in this technology may be profitable but results were very herd‐specific. A simulation modeling a deterministic 25 percent decrease in the percentage of cows with BCS at calving ≤3.25 demonstrated a positive NPV in 86.6 percent of 1,000 iterations.

Originality/value

This investment decision can be analyzed with input of herd‐specific values using this model.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 70 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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