Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

MOHAN M KUMARASWAMY

The findings from a set of related investigations into construction megaproject management were integrated into models, frameworks and basic guidelines that would help to…

Abstract

The findings from a set of related investigations into construction megaproject management were integrated into models, frameworks and basic guidelines that would help to improve and integrate (1) work packaging, (2) project participant selection and (3) operational management subsystems. More creative approaches to work packaging and participant selection were seen to significantly support construction industry development and the consequent longer‐term benefits in developing countries. A paradigm of ‘technology exchange’ is proposed as the basis of more viable and mutually beneficial joint ventures which would also facilitate the innovative packaging and integrated management of megaprojects in developing countries. Additionally, it is recommended that hitherto isolated initiatives related to quality, safety or dispute resolution/avoidance should be integrated into synergistic management systems which also incorporate built‐in monitoring and evaluation sub‐systems. In turn, the latter would trigger both short‐ and long‐term remedial measures related to improved project packaging, for example, as well as to personnel training and organizational development programmes.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

MOHAN KUMARASWAMY and MOHAMMED DULAIMI

The heightened state of flux in the construction industry in general and construction procurement strategies in particular, provides welcome opportunities to inject…

Abstract

The heightened state of flux in the construction industry in general and construction procurement strategies in particular, provides welcome opportunities to inject innovative improvements. While some improvements are generated from within the construction industry itself, these evolve sluggishly along prolonged learning curves. These are compared with lessons to be learnt and examples to be drawn from manufacturing in the development of a marketable product. A product development focus is thus advocated in re‐integrating segregated groups and in empowering and inspiring the innovations that are needed to achieve the dramatic productivity gains now demanded from the construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

M. MOTIAR RAHMAN and M.M. KUMARASWAMY

This paper reports the outcomes of the first of three planned questionnaire surveys in the first phase of a broader Hong Kong based study on ‘Joint Risk Management’ (JRM)…

Abstract

This paper reports the outcomes of the first of three planned questionnaire surveys in the first phase of a broader Hong Kong based study on ‘Joint Risk Management’ (JRM). The survey compared perceptions on both present and preferred risk allocation, including JRM, in construction contracts. Data was mainly collected in Hong Kong and mainland China (with most respondents having working experience from Hong Kong) from various professionals and practitioners representing broad groups of academics, consultants, contractors and owners (clients). Survey results reinforce previous observations (in Canada) of the divergences in perceptions on both present and preferred risk allocation, both within and between different contracting parties. The present study reveals quite wide (marked) divergencies with many individual cases of diametrically opposing views on allocating particular risks within specific groups. Despite such divergencies, respondents professed a general enthusiasm towards JRM, irrespective of their contractual or professional affiliation. Moreover, they generally preferred to assign reduced risks from either one or both contracting parties to JRM, rather than shifting more risks to the other party. This is indicative of a perceived trend towards more collaborative and teamwork based working environments.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kelwin K.W. Wong, Mohan Kumaraswamy, Gangadhar Mahesh and Florence Y.Y. Ling

This paper aims to investigate the relevance of the relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) concept for integrating project management (PM) and asset management…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relevance of the relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) concept for integrating project management (PM) and asset management (AM) for total asset management (TAM). The specific objectives are to test the RIVANS for TAM concept postulated by Kumaraswamy (2011) and Kumaraswamy et al. (2012); discover ways to enable PM and AM teams to work in an integrated manner; and recommend strategies and operational measures to promote greater team integration in the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based in Hong Kong with parallel studies in the UK, Singapore and Sri Lanka. Through a comprehensive questionnaire, a case study on an organization engaged in both design and construction and operations and maintenance (O&M) works, interviews and hosting a workshop (all conducted with experienced industry practitioners and experts), a set of recommendations are derived to guide the industry toward greater team integration.

Findings

Early involvement of O&M staff is important for better anticipating obstacles and learning from past experiences, but PM and AM teams generally work independently with limited interaction. Priorities of the stakeholders are often different. Knowledge management is increasingly important, but knowledge sharing is not always a priority. The three focus areas in the set of recommendations developed from Hong Kong are: organizational/management structure, procurement strategies and operational mechanisms; fostering culture of team building and providing additional means of communication; and informal communication tools.

Originality/value

There has been little research into the communication, interaction and integration between PM and AM priorities and teams. However, increasing industry emphasis on sustainable buildings, end-user satisfaction and designing for maintainability dictates that PM and AM teams must work closer together, hence the imperative for mapping useful directions to be pursued.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

E. PALANEESWARAN and M.M. KUMARASWAMY

Benchmarking of best practices has proved useful in the business and manufacturing sectors. However, benchmarking is not established in the construction industry in…

Abstract

Benchmarking of best practices has proved useful in the business and manufacturing sectors. However, benchmarking is not established in the construction industry in general and in government organizations in particular. A study of the contractor selection methodologies used by various clients confirms the multiplicity of approaches in practice. This paper aims at identifying some relevant ‘best’ practices and highlighting ‘innovative’ contractor selection approaches that have been used by large public clients. A ‘co‐operative’ and ‘non‐competitive’ conceptual benchmarking model is formulated and presented with a view to encouraging continuous improvement in contractor selection for construction projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

MOHAN M. KUMARASWAMY

It is necessary and useful to differentiate destructive from constructive conflict and avoidable from necessary claims; and also to minimize disputes arising from…

Abstract

It is necessary and useful to differentiate destructive from constructive conflict and avoidable from necessary claims; and also to minimize disputes arising from unresolved conflict and claims in construction projects. This paper analyses such needs and proposes means of meeting them through an appropriate classification of construction claims; an estimation of their relative significance in terms of magnitude and frequency; and an identification of the proximate and root causes of the significant claims. A hierarchy of such claims, proximate and root causes is presented, based mainly on data collected from 61 projects and on 46 responses to questionnaires in Hong Kong. Measures of the relative significance of the claims categories are also presented. The results are reinforced by observations from parallel studies in Hong Kong and elsewhere, as well as from the literature. Strategies are suggested to avoid the avoidable and mitigate the unavoidable or unavoided claims, through controlling the controllable causes. Management focus is also recommended on controlling the causes of those categories of claims and disputes that are seen to be significant in terms of higher impact and/or probability of occurrence.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mohan M. Kumaraswamy, Florence Y.Y. Ling, Aaron M. Anvuur and M. Motiar Rahman

This paper targets the development of comprehensive approaches to prequalifying teams for Public Private Partnerships (PPPs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper targets the development of comprehensive approaches to prequalifying teams for Public Private Partnerships (PPPs).

Design/methodology/approach

Research outcomes from a study into “relationally integrated project teams” (RIPTs) were applied to necessarily longer‐term PPP scenarios. A force field model was developed to visualise the importance of stronger relational forces between the many PPP participants for “sustainable RIPTs” (SRITs). A framework was conceptualised to show linkages from relational contracting approaches, through sustainable relationships to sustainable infrastructure. This framework and a basic model for evaluating relational performance, were assessed by a panel of international PPP experts.

Findings

The results encouraged the collection of factors facilitating successful relationships to build the proposed knowledge base. Literature review and initial interviews provide examples of priorities and lessons learned in relationship building in ongoing PPPs.

Research limitations/implications

Being an integrative theory‐building type exercise bringing together relational contracting, teambuilding and PPP performance research streams, this paper summarises and refers to, rather than provides details of, feeder research. Fleshing out the conceptual framework and model will next proceed beyond the initial testing and sample knowledge elements conveyed herein.

Practical implications

Selecting good teams is essential for successful projects, and more so for PPP projects, given their complexities and longer timeframes. Increasing reliance on PPPs for infrastructure development and asset management enhances this significance.

Originality/value

Synergies are derived from linking relationship‐building and sustainability thrusts in the context of PPP performance. Concepts of “sustainable relationships” and “sustainsivity” (sensitivity to sustainability issues) are introduced.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

SUNIL M. DISSANAYAKA and MOHAN M. KUMARASWAMY

Time and cost are usually critical to construction clients. Given the many contributory factors, improved quantitative models of time and cost may help clients to predict…

Abstract

Time and cost are usually critical to construction clients. Given the many contributory factors, improved quantitative models of time and cost may help clients to predict project outcomes at the outset, and also at different stages of the project life span. These can also help to compare deviations in significant contributory factors, and to suggest corrective actions. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural networks (ANN) were applied in developing such quantitative models in a research project based in Hong Kong. A comparative study indicated that ANN had better prediction capabilities than MLR by itself. Significant factors identified through quantitative models developed, indicated that time over‐run levels were mainly governed by non‐procurement related factors (e.g. project characteristics and client/client representative characteristics), while cost over‐run levels were significantly influenced by both procurement and non‐procurement related factors (e.g. project characteristics, client/client representative characteristics and contractual payment modalities). A parallel approach yielded interesting comparisons of the variations of mean time and cost over‐runs, when comparing groups of projects using different procurement sub‐systems, from the Hong Kong sample.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nayanthara De Silva, R.P.N.P. Weerasinghe, H.W.N. Madhusanka and Mohan Kumaraswamy

A case is made for developing “Relationally Integrated Value Networks for Total Facilities Management” (RIVANS-TFM) by synergistically connecting significant stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

A case is made for developing “Relationally Integrated Value Networks for Total Facilities Management” (RIVANS-TFM) by synergistically connecting significant stakeholders of the project management (PM) and facilities management (FM) phases to deliver substantially better value for the end users of built infrastructure. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire survey enabled identification of typically significant stakeholders in the PM and FM phases. In total, 14 key stakeholders were identified through t-test analysis in this Sri Lankan study. Semi-structured interviews unveiled relationships among the aforementioned stakeholders and the findings were used to develop the “required” RIVANS-TFM, as well as the “existing” RIVANS-TFM, using the UCINET social network analysis software package. Social network theory of relationships was applied to analyze the networks in terms of “Structural Holes” or missing links and “Brokerage Potentials.”

Findings

Structural holes analysis highlighted the existing setup to be more vulnerable to missing links than the “required”/targeted setup. Furthermore, brokerage potentials analysis revealed that owners, project managers, facility managers, maintenance engineers, main contractors, designers, principal consultants, and other specialist consultants can act as “brokers” to bridge the gaps or minimize structural holes, thereby uplifting and reinforcing the existing network to deliver better performance and value in TFM.

Originality/value

By revealing existing and required levels of integration of each stakeholder in RIVANS-TFM, clients are provided a great opportunity to identify the stakeholders who should be engaged more, or less – in order to best achieve clients’ long-term aspirations and project objectives. Furthermore, the findings also indicate appropriate levels of stakeholder relationships to target, in order to maintain efficient flows of information, material and services in the supply chains while enhancing TFM life-cycle values.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000