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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

L.E. Falkenberg, M.L. Monachello and L.C. Edlund

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work…

Abstract

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work (Paris, 1989). Balancing work and family has been considered a women's issue, with the question being whether women could handle both the home demands and the responsibilities of a paid job. Yet the entrance of women into the workforce has also required major role adjustments by their husbands. According to the traditional model of work, husbands prioritize work over family with the wife providing the necessary emotional and physical support to keep the husband in “good working order” (Pleck, 1977). In today's society, this model is no longer widely applicable, as men in dual earner families receive less emotional support than their single‐earner counterparts (Burke, & Weir, 1976; Keith, & Schafer, 1980) and tend to assume greater family responsibilities (Holahan, & Gilbert, 1979; Weingarten, 1978).

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Glenn F. Ross

The ethical principles that potential tourism/hospitality employees bring to this industry have, only in the last decade or so, begun to receive research scrutiny…

Abstract

The ethical principles that potential tourism/hospitality employees bring to this industry have, only in the last decade or so, begun to receive research scrutiny. Fundamental ethical beliefs, it is suggested, are likely to have wideranging implications in regard to issues such as management style and workstress problem‐solving, particularly in the face of perceived indifference or injustice among prospective employers and supervisors. Ethical beliefs accompanying prospective employees are likely to be attended by expectations regarding the validity and efficacy of particular workstress problem‐solving strategies perceived to be displayed by tourism industry management. This study has examined four basic ethical principles that are at the core of optimal employee functioning: efficiency, reliability, Initiative and hardwork; the paper has also examined a range of perceived tourism industry management workstress response strategies among a sample of potential tourism industry employees, particularly as those perceptions may be mediated by basic workplace ethical beliefs. Major perceived workstress problem‐solving responses by tourism industry management were found to involve the enhancement of workplace trust, workplace communication, and global management change within the workplace. More highly rated ethical ideals involved showing initiative and responsibility, whereas lower rated ideals were efficiency and hardwork. It was also revealed that ideal ethical ratings for initiative, responsibility and efficiency were higher than perceived ethical expectations among tourism industry management; potential tourism industry employees rated hardwork lower than they believed tourism industry management would so do. The response of trust emerged as the most valued of the workstress alleviation responses, and was found to be associated with most of the ethical principles. The global management change response was also found to be associated with similar ethical principles, though to a lesser degree; the communication workstress response was also found to be a prominent management workstress response expectation, though was not revealed to be predictive of the four workplace ethical principles. Implications of these findings for human resource management operations within the tourism/hospitality industry, and for further research directions, are presented.

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Tourism Review, vol. 58 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Evangelos Christou, Fotis Kilipiris, Ioannis Karamanidis, Careva Vasilevska, Naume Marinoski and Josif Andreeski

The recent adverse economic and military developments in the Balkan Peninsula have provided sound indications regarding the future development of the area. It now seems to…

Abstract

The recent adverse economic and military developments in the Balkan Peninsula have provided sound indications regarding the future development of the area. It now seems to be unavoidable that a revised economic environment should be created, based on stability and economic co‐operation. Such a co‐operation among the Balkan countries will assist a common effort in establishing the framework for the development of all the relevant area.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 55 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Jillian Cavanagh and Ron Fisher

This research aims to extend the traditional cultural divide between male and female lawyers by examining contradictory workplace policies that discriminate against the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to extend the traditional cultural divide between male and female lawyers by examining contradictory workplace policies that discriminate against the work and education of female auxiliary workers within general legal practice in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses membership categorisation devices, an ethnomethodological approach, to analyse two policy statements which are in common use in Australian legal practice.

Findings

The research finds that the statements, which are a merge of policy and procedures, are fundamentally contradictory. Whilst one prohibits and represses any discrimination against women, the other does not provide educational opportunities for employees, predominantly women, at the auxiliary level of employment. As a result female auxiliary workers are marginalised and their career prospects are diminished.

Practical implications

Policies guiding work and education in Australian legal practice reinforce a culture of gender‐based discrimination. It is argued that espoused policies need to reflect policies in action by providing career opportunities for women auxiliary workers.

Originality/value

The research challenges the notion that espousing a policy of equal opportunity leads to women receiving the same educational opportunities as men in Australian legal practice. The research shows the importance of understanding how job category has cultural and gendered meanings.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Linda M. Hite and Kimberly S. McDonald

Although the proportion of women entering management has increasedgreatly in the last two decades, their subsequent promotion intoexecutive positions has not materialized…

Abstract

Although the proportion of women entering management has increased greatly in the last two decades, their subsequent promotion into executive positions has not materialized. Explores how management development training may impede women′s progress. Examines factors that may hinder women′s opportunities to advance into upper management (and, consequently, to contribute to the success of their organizations). Also looks at research on gender issues in the academic classroom and how this literature relates to management development training. Discusses implications and recommendations to consider when training and developing women managers and provides an agenda for further research on potential gender bias in managerial training and development opportunities.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Andreas Walmsley, Ko Koens and Claudio Milano

This paper aims to undertake an ideal-typical analysis of the implications of overtourism on employment at the level of the destination.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to undertake an ideal-typical analysis of the implications of overtourism on employment at the level of the destination.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers a theoretical analysis that uses as a starting point a traditional labour market model to explore the employment implications of a labour demand shock as a result of overtourism at a destination level. Although a theoretical exploration, examples are provided offering empirical support for the theoretical propositions.

Findings

Overtourism may lower nominal and real wages, further deepen divisions in an already divided labour market (particularly between local and migrant workers), increase productivity without its benefits accruing to the worker and result in deterioration of working conditions. The study also sets tourism employment within a broader politico-economic framework of neoliberalism.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers scope for further empirical testing of hypothesized relationships. It also provides a platform to adopt and adapt the theoretical propositions to suit different contexts.

Originality/value

This study uses overtourism as an ideal-type, combined with an analysis of the labour market to theorise the impacts of a labour demand shock.

过度旅游以及旅游工作者的就业结果: 对劳动力市场的影响

研究目的

就过度旅游对当地就业的影响进行理想类型分析。

研究设计

以传统劳动力市场模型为出发点, 对因过度旅游引起的劳动力需求冲击进而给当地就业带来的影响进行理论探索与分析。虽为理论探索, 本文也提供实证案例以支持有关理论观点。

研究结果

过度旅游可能会降低名义和实际工资, 造成本已分割的劳动力市场的进一步分割(特别是在当地和外地劳动者之间), 提高生产力但并不惠及其劳动者, 并导致工作环境恶化。本研究将旅游就业置于广义新自由主义政治经济框架下进行讨论。

研究原创性

将过度旅游作为一种理想类型, 并与劳动力市场分析相结合, 以理论化劳动力需求冲击所带来的影响。

研究影响

为进一步实证测试假设关系提供机会。为不同背景下采纳和适应有关理论观点提供平台。

El exceso de turismo y las repercusiones en el empleo turístico: Impactos en los mercados laborales

Propósito

Realizar un análisis típico-ideal sobre cómo la masificación turística de los destinos influye sobre el empleo.

Diseño

Un análisis teórico que utiliza como punto de partida el modelo de mercado laboral tradicional para explorar las implicaciones que la masificación de los destinos turísticos tiene sobre la demanda de trabajo. La investigación proporciona ejemplos que respaldan empíricamente las proposiciones teóricas.

Hallazgos

Los excesos turísticos tienden a reducir los salarios nominales y reales, a profundizar aún más las divisiones de un mercado laboral ya dividido (en particular entre los trabajadores locales y los migrantes), a aumentar la productividad sin que sus beneficios repercutan en el trabajador y a provocar un deterioro de las condiciones de trabajo. El estudio también sitúa el empleo en el sector del turismo dentro del marco político-económico, más amplio, del neoliberalismo.

Originalidad

Utiliza la masificación turística, como “ideal-típico”, junto con un análisis del mercado laboral turístico para teorizar sobre los impactos en la demanda laboral.

Implicaciones de la investigación

Ofrece la posibilidad de realizar más investigaciones empíricas a partir de las relaciones hipotéticas postuladas. Proporciona una plataforma para adoptar y adaptar las proposiciones teóricas para que se adecúen a diferentes contextos.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Marija Rok and Matjaž Mulej

The purpose of this paper is to establish a new model of managing human resources in the service industry. The authors aim to raise awareness of the failing effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a new model of managing human resources in the service industry. The authors aim to raise awareness of the failing effects of human resource management (HRM) so far and indicate possible solutions to long-lasting labour issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors aim to outgrow the current personnel management concepts by approaching the employment management problem requisitely holistically. By combining the concepts of systems thinking, requisite well-being and social responsibility, the authors aim to introduce a new model for managing human resources. An analysis of the relevant HRM models and a perusal of identified issues concerning labour enabled the development of the new HRM model.

Findings

Under-investment in human capital in service industries has resulted in high staff turnover and negative attitudes towards service occupations. Recognition of the need for an improved approach to human resources management brings about substantial changes in the strategic management both on the industry- and the organizational levels.

Research limitations/implications

Research is theoretical with indirect empirical impact. The proposed model will meet the requirements of systems thinking principles as well as socially responsible corporate behaviour.

Practical implications

Improved understanding that human talent and their well-being should be in the centre of business strategies.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is in the raised awareness of the need for more innovative and flexible labour market policies. The proposed model is in accordance with the formal corporate pledge to act socially responsible and can be applied in tourism and hospitality organizations.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Mervyn D.J. Wilson, Anna E. Murray, Margaret A. Black and David A. McDowell

In recent times the importance of training and education have been recognised as important tools to foster economic growth within companies and industries in the global…

Abstract

In recent times the importance of training and education have been recognised as important tools to foster economic growth within companies and industries in the global marketplace. Unfortunately the UK hospitality industry in general has been unwilling to train and develop its managers. This paper examines the contract catering sector of the hospitality industry in Northern Ireland. It commences by investigating the educational qualifications and training of managers within the contract catering sector and then proceeds to discuss the transference of hospitality skills and practices.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Loren Falkenberg and Mary Monachello

The interaction of work and household responsibilities indual‐career families is described. If married, the woman manager almostalways faces the traditional demands placed…

Abstract

The interaction of work and household responsibilities in dual‐career families is described. If married, the woman manager almost always faces the traditional demands placed on women by husband and family. The notion of “role overload” is developed but it is stressed that this need not mean that a woman′s productivity on the job suffers. Organisations need to recognise that women′s work patterns differ from men′s and should evaluate quality of work, not necessarily the number of hours on the job. By understanding the demands women face and by providing women the flexibility needed to deal with them, both the quality of working life for women and their contributions to the firm can be enhanced.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Karen Korabik and Roya Ayman

Recently, more and more North American women have been choosing to pursue careers in management and the professions. The invasion of women into these once exclusively…

Abstract

Recently, more and more North American women have been choosing to pursue careers in management and the professions. The invasion of women into these once exclusively masculine domains has been accompanied by a host of problems, many of which were unanticipated. In the articles presented here we examine the nature of these problems and provide some suggestions about what can be done to help resolve them.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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