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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

M.L. Emiliani

1903

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

M.L. Emiliani and D.J. Stec

To examine why most Lean transformations achieve only modest favorable results, despite years of effort.

7671

Abstract

Purpose

To examine why most Lean transformations achieve only modest favorable results, despite years of effort.

Design/methodology/approach

Comparative/evaluative discussion of efforts made by senior managers to implement the Lean management system, with commentary on a published example.

Findings

Presents common obstacles and identifies common implementation errors that must be avoided in order to realize the full benefits of the Lean management system.

Research limitations/implications

Illustrates the ease by which Lean transformation efforts can lead to less desirable outcomes when senior managers fail to fully grasp the implicit and explicit aspects of both task and behavioral elements of a new management system.

Practical implications

Provides specific suggestions that will enable senior managers and organizations to achieve improved outcomes.

Originality/value

Identifies numerous common errors made by senior managers, the rationale for why the errors have occurred, and suggests improvements for implementing the Lean management system.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

M.L. Emiliani and D.J. Stec

Examines if online reverse auctions are consistent with the Caux Round Table Principles for Business. Identifies numerous contradictions that contribute to the…

1289

Abstract

Examines if online reverse auctions are consistent with the Caux Round Table Principles for Business. Identifies numerous contradictions that contribute to the perpetuation of divisive business practices. Concludes that buyer behaviors must evolve from focusing on short‐term tactics designed to reduce purchase price and instead pursue collaborative cost reduction practices with key suppliers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

M.L. Emiliani and D.J. Stec

Presents for the first time how value‐stream maps can be used to determine leadership beliefs, behaviors, and competencies. Current‐state value‐stream maps represent…

10976

Abstract

Presents for the first time how value‐stream maps can be used to determine leadership beliefs, behaviors, and competencies. Current‐state value‐stream maps represent “conventional” management thinking and practices – what most business schools teach – while future‐state maps represent progressive “lean” management thinking and practices rooted in the Toyota management system. Current‐ and future‐state value‐stream maps for manufacturing and service business processes are used to illustrate the progression from belief to behavior to competency. The beliefs, behaviors, and competencies of leaders skilled in these two modes of management thinking and practice are shown to be remarkably different, and constitute an alternative and simpler route for identifying leadership problems and improving leadership effectiveness.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

M.L. Emiliani

Examines the source of conflict between buyers and sellers as it relates to the price of goods purchased for use in production. Focuses on management’s understanding and…

3356

Abstract

Examines the source of conflict between buyers and sellers as it relates to the price of goods purchased for use in production. Focuses on management’s understanding and application of the term “maximize shareholder value”, which is found to result in business decisions that marginalize suppliers’ capabilities and interests. Concludes that conflict between buyers and sellers is an inevitable outcome when buyers make decisions principally centered upon the literal interpretation of management’s role as agents of the board whose primary responsibility is to maximize shareholder value. This finding has widespread implications for both academics and practitioners, as making this linkage explicit defines the challenge for improving purchasing and supply chain management practices in a new way.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

M.L. Emiliani

To present an outsider's view of how management education can be significantly improved.

2818

Abstract

Purpose

To present an outsider's view of how management education can be significantly improved.

Design/methodology/approach

Focuses on correcting several obvious deficiencies in courses and degree programs to create highly differentiated educational experiences that are more relevant to student's needs and the organizations that employ graduates.

Findings

Proposes a suite of 11 interconnected improvements as well as a fundamental re‐structuring of the MBA program designed to simplify it, provide greater focus, improve relevancy, and impart needed thematic consistency.

Practical implications

Presents 11 practical improvements individual faculty or schools can readily incorporate into existing courses or degree programs. The proposed curriculum for a completely re‐structured MBA program can add distinctiveness and expand the value proposition for students and their employers.

Originality/value

The suite of 11 improvements and proposed MBA program curriculum changes offers an alternate route for preparing students for future global business challenges. The proposed improvements are intended to serve as a foundation for discussion and debate, and hopefully future action as well.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

M.L. Emiliani and Michael Emiliani

The purpose of this paper is to explain why most senior managers have great difficulty comprehending and correctly practising the Lean management system, thereby…

1653

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain why most senior managers have great difficulty comprehending and correctly practising the Lean management system, thereby handicapping their ability to lead enterprise‐wide Lean transformations; to describe the depth and richness of relationships between the Lean management system and music; to help improve practitioners’ understanding of Lean management and how to learn it; and to help senior managers recognize the need to personally apply Lean principles and practices daily to become capable Lean leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a qualitative examination of various characteristics of the Lean management system and music, based in part on the authors’ experience implementing Lean in manufacturing and service businesses, and also in learning to play music over a nine‐year period.

Findings

The Lean management system and music share numerous similarities, including the difficulty most people encounter learning each discipline. The paper highlights the importance of daily practice by senior managers to learn and understand Lean management in order to capably lead enterprise‐wide Lean transformations, and to recognize and correct problems in Lean thinking and practice among themselves and others.

Research limitations/implications

Elucidation of the deep similarities between Lean and music does not answer the fundamental question of how to increase the number of senior managers who are interested in becoming capable Lean leaders.

Practical implications

The paper provides an answer to the question of why it is so difficult for senior managers, and others, to correctly understand and practise the Lean management system. It clarifies the deep level of personal understanding, leadership involvement, and daily routines required to have greater success with Lean management.

Social implications

Management practitioners who improve their understanding of Lean leadership will avoid common errors that undermine leadership credibility and morale among followers, and which impair the achievement of successful Lean transformations.

Originality/value

The paper presents a novel approach to understanding the Lean management system by using music as the framework. It shows how effective Lean leadership is more the result of daily practice than it is of the personal attributes normally associated with capable leadership. The deep similarities between Lean management and music have not been previously described in the literature.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

C. Giampietro and M.L. Emiliani

The paper seeks to examine the presence of coercion in the common use of reverse auctions for industrial procurement and spend management activities, and to illustrate the…

2557

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine the presence of coercion in the common use of reverse auctions for industrial procurement and spend management activities, and to illustrate the many problems that arise when purchasing and supply management is viewed by powerful buying organizations as a simple dyadic relationship with sellers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review, and analysis of the meaning of coercion, and supplier survey data.

Findings

Reverse auctions, as commonly used, are shown to be fundamentally coercive, with coercion being essential for achieving the outcomes that buyers seek.

Research limitations/implications

Survey responses and findings that can be drawn from them are limited due to the small sample size. Reflects the dyadic nature of buyers' corporate codes of conduct in relation to the day‐to‐day practice of purchasing and supply management.

Practical implications

The existence of coercion indicates that reverse auctions are inconsistent with corporate codes of ethics or codes of conduct with respect to supplier relationships (e.g. fairness, honesty, and integrity). Reverse auctions are also shown to be inconsistent with US federal procurement standards and the Institute of Supply Management's “Principles and standards of ethical supply management conduct”.

Originality/value

The paper brings to the forefront the existence of psychological and economic coercion in the common use of reverse auctions, and discusses how this creates difficult problems for both buyers and sellers. It also presents alternative strategies that managers in buying and selling organizations can use instead of reverse auctions.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

M.L. Emiliani and D.J. Stec

Discusses the savings that can result from online reverse auctions for the specific case of buyer‐designed machined parts. Distinguishes between gross and net savings, and…

3688

Abstract

Discusses the savings that can result from online reverse auctions for the specific case of buyer‐designed machined parts. Distinguishes between gross and net savings, and highlights factors that can reduce the magnitude of anticipated savings. Determines that the savings actually achieved are less than that reported by suppliers of online auction services for the type of buyer‐designed production materials under consideration. Examines the root cause of why managers use online reverse auctions to reduce the price of purchased goods and services. Concludes that the root cause of online reverse auctions is local optimization of the business system along functional, managerial, or financial dimensions, which in turn perpetuates chronic underutilization of valuable internal and external resources.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

M.L. Emiliani, D.J. Stec and L.P. Grasso

To describe the tactics that buyers often use to avoid unfavorable purchase price variance (PPV) and identify alternate approaches that will improve purchasing performance…

2536

Abstract

Purpose

To describe the tactics that buyers often use to avoid unfavorable purchase price variance (PPV) and identify alternate approaches that will improve purchasing performance and also help achieve company objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Descriptive: presents for the first time 12 dysfunctional tactics used by buyers of industrial goods use to avoid unfavorable PPV.

Findings

The tactics are shown to increase costs rather than decrease costs and lead to organizational dysfunction. Findings are broadly applicable to large corporations that use legacy software systems or newer enterprise requirement planning (ERP) software systems to track purchasing costs and transactions, and also have a strong management focus on price‐based purchasing performance.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are limited to organizations that measure the success of purchasing and supply management activities using price‐based metrics.

Practical implications

Should propel managers to identify alternative metrics or processes for managing purchasing performance, reduce system‐wide costs, and improve day‐to‐day work in purchasing organizations.

Originality/value

This paper will be helpful to academics researching operational or behavioral aspects of purchasing, practitioners managing supply chains, auditors assessing the integrity of material cost reporting and management controls, and persons concerned about ethics in business.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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