Search results

1 – 10 of 36
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb014603. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb014603. When citing the article, please cite: M.J. Ploos van Amstel, (1985), “Physical Distribution Cost Control”, International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, Vol. 15 Iss: 1, pp. 49 - 60.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1987

M.J. Ploos van Amstel and W. Ploos van Amstel

It is often stated that a trade‐off occurs when a cost increase in one field is over‐compensated by a cost reduction in another field, resulting in an overall improved…

Abstract

It is often stated that a trade‐off occurs when a cost increase in one field is over‐compensated by a cost reduction in another field, resulting in an overall improved situation. Economic Trade‐offs (ETOs) are calculations intended to support decision making in respect of business activities. In this respect an ETO is, of course, only an aid and not a goal in itself.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Konstantinos Selviaridis and Martin Spring

To provide a taxonomy of third party logistics (3PL) research and, based on that, to develop a research agenda for this field of study.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a taxonomy of third party logistics (3PL) research and, based on that, to develop a research agenda for this field of study.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed 3PL research classification framework is based on a comprehensive literature review, which concentrates on peer‐reviewed journal papers published within the period 1990‐2005. A total of 114 academic sources have been retrieved and analysed in terms of research purpose and nature, method employed, theoretical approach and level of analysis.

Findings

The review reveals that 3PL research is empirical‐descriptive in nature and that it generally lacks a theoretical foundation. Survey research is the dominant method employed, reflecting the positivist research tradition within logistics. It identifies certain knowledge gaps and develops five propositions for future research. It suggests that focus should be directed towards more normative, theory‐driven and qualitative method‐based studies. It also argues that further empirical research in relation to 3PL design/implementation and fourth party logistics services is needed.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need for a comprehensive classification framework of 3PL studies. It essentially provides both academics and practitioners with a conceptual map of existing 3PL research and also points out opportunities for future research.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

M.J. Ploos van Amstel and M.F.G.M. Verstegen

Industrial enterprises are having to meet changes in customers' requirements at ever shorter intervals. The life cycles of products are becoming shorter, the pay‐back time…

Abstract

Industrial enterprises are having to meet changes in customers' requirements at ever shorter intervals. The life cycles of products are becoming shorter, the pay‐back time of development costs likewise. Various concepts, such as Just‐in‐Time (JIT) and Total Quality Control (TQC) have been developed to meet the ever stricter demands made on products, their production and distribution processes; demands which may well be even more stringent in the liberalized Europe of the years following 1992.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

M.J. Ploos van Amstel

The growing relative significance of the costs of physical distribution is making it increasingly necessary to structure the control of physical distribution costs within…

Abstract

The growing relative significance of the costs of physical distribution is making it increasingly necessary to structure the control of physical distribution costs within the company. It is sometimes thought that the costs of physical distribution amount to only two or three per cent of turnover. It is not to be denied that this percentage will apply in some cases, but often it is an imprecise definition of the physical distribution function in the company, together with a somewhat imprecise cost allocation, which leads to percentages of this kind.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

M.J. Ploos van Amstel

The well‐known maxim “different products, different requirements” is, of course, derived from practical experience. This article seeks to establish whether this maxim also…

Abstract

The well‐known maxim “different products, different requirements” is, of course, derived from practical experience. This article seeks to establish whether this maxim also has significance when viewed from the perspective of physical distribution. In particular, it will consider what this significance is with reference to physical distribution strategy, production allocation and stock allocation policy. At the same time it will seek to establish which product characteristics can significantly shape this policy.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

M.J. Ploos van Amstel and David Farmer

One of the outcomes of the fiercely competitive business environment of the late 1980s and early 1990s has been the increasing attention which has been paid to logistical…

Abstract

One of the outcomes of the fiercely competitive business environment of the late 1980s and early 1990s has been the increasing attention which has been paid to logistical issues in many types of business. The demands of the customers of manufacturing concerns for greater flexibility, faster reaction and greater reliability in respect of delivery times and quality levels have forced producers to act. And their action in most cases has involved the search for more effective ways to manage material flows. Meanwhile, retailers have become increasingly aware of the competitive edge which they can gain by exerting greater control of the input to their businesses. As a result it is now quite common, for example, for retailers to require their suppliers to deliver goods within a one hour ‘window’ on a specified day. In addition, the most powerful have required their major suppliers to become E.D.I. (Electronic Data Interchange) connected with them.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Freek Aertsen

Discusses the question of whether a firm should set up anown‐account physical distribution organization or contract out thedistribution function. Shows how the concepts of…

Abstract

Discusses the question of whether a firm should set up an own‐account physical distribution organization or contract out the distribution function. Shows how the concepts of transaction cost economics, particularly asset specificity and performance ambiguity, can shed light on the division of responsibility for the physical distribution function between in‐house operations and outside contractors.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Dany Jacobs

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the actual state of demand chain management compared with its promises of a few years ago.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the actual state of demand chain management compared with its promises of a few years ago.

Design/methodology/approach

The most important literature on demand chain management of recent years is confronted with recent findings on strategies of the main supply and demand‐oriented firms in the fashion industry and on consumer behaviour.

Findings

Following Hoover et al. the demand chain is defined as “the chain of activities that communicates demand from markets to suppliers”. In this paper some interesting contributions to this debates are reviewed. Then, on the basis of remaining problems in the fashion industry in the realm of failing customer satisfaction, questions whether the promise of demand chain is not a consequence of shortcomings in the field of marketing – which apparently has moved too much into the direction of strategic positioning and information push instead of market research.

Research limitations/implications

Even when some of the most interesting approaches to demand chain management and key developments in the industry are confronted with one another, these selections cannot claim to be exhaustive.

Practical implications

The conclusion, proposing to concentrate on efficient supply chain management, on the one hand, and better understanding consumers, on the other hand, helps fashion firms to focus their attention more clearly.

Originality/value

No such overview and confrontation, as presented in this article, existed until now. Also, the view that demand chain management in a way tries to fill the gaps left by market research sheds new light on these discussions.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

James M. Kenderdine and Paul D. Larson

Logistics decisions can have a significant impact on product offer quality so quality costs must be integrated into total cost analysis.

Abstract

Logistics decisions can have a significant impact on product offer quality so quality costs must be integrated into total cost analysis.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

1 – 10 of 36