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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Michael Donnelly and Andrea Abbas

Basil Bernstein’s theoretical ideas have been called upon by far fewer higher education researchers than would be expected. We argue that the international higher…

Abstract

Basil Bernstein’s theoretical ideas have been called upon by far fewer higher education researchers than would be expected. We argue that the international higher education field of research is ripe for further application of Bernstein’s theoretical ideas. Through reference to our own and that of others, we illustrate five key affordances of Bernstein’s theoretical framework. First, it provides a unique approach that leads researchers to pose formerly unthinkable questions and encourages the development of new knowledge to address them. Second, Bernstein’s valuable concepts raise questions about the specific but inter-related macro- (societal), meso- (organisational) and micro- (individual) level processes involved in producing (in)equalities. Bernsteinian analysis can help to identify how inequalities emerge from and can be addressed at these levels. Third, we contend that the approach encourages empirical exploration of the ways in which education may be disruptive of the social order. Fourth, we suggest Bernstein’s concepts can be adapted to capture the complexity of intersecting inequalities in a way that allows the object of analysis to determine what inequalities are foregrounded. Finally, we argue that concepts help to orientate questions around inequality and social justice in a way that does not over-determine answers.

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Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-277-0

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Sarah Horrod

Building on the proposition that Bernstein's ideas are due for a revival in higher education research, the call for studies in which theory is put to use and for policy…

Abstract

Building on the proposition that Bernstein's ideas are due for a revival in higher education research, the call for studies in which theory is put to use and for policy studies to engage in textual analysis, this chapter argues for the affordances of the theoretical underpinnings of Bernstein's pedagogic device and critical discourse studies in investigating connections between policy and practice. Drawing on the sociology of pedagogy and applied linguistics, this chapter aims to explore the theoretical complementarities of the chosen approaches for exploring how policy ideas move through time and space. A focus on the notion of recontextualisation enables an understanding of how influences beyond the discipline itself, including policy discourses, can shape learning, teaching and assessment practices. The illustrating case examines policy on learning and teaching and how these ideas are recontextualised from national policy through to institutional policy and individual practices. The critical or questioning angle of both approaches in seeing ideas, including policy, as never value-free but as situated within their sociopolitical context can shed light on how policy ideas make their way into universities and in whose interests.

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Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-321-2

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2020

Shinhee Jeong, Jeanne M. Bailey, Jin Lee and Gary N. McLean

The purpose of this study is to help us understand social entrepreneurs’ lived experiences, reflecting the comprehensive entrepreneurial processes that encompass their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to help us understand social entrepreneurs’ lived experiences, reflecting the comprehensive entrepreneurial processes that encompass their past, present and future.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative approach was used to explore the meaning of experiences in social entrepreneurs’ professional lives through the stories retold and restructured by social entrepreneurs. A total of 11 social entrepreneurs in the Midwest region of the USA were interviewed.

Findings

The authors identified three time-sequential themes: past (looking backward at the origin), present (living life as a social entrepreneur) and future (looking forward). Seven sub-themes emerged, revealing social entrepreneurs’ aspiration, self-knowledge, identity-defining moments, their sustainability-oriented leadership and how they build an organizational structure, partnership and handle the burden of work and the organization.

Practical implications

The findings offer useful information for future social entrepreneurs as they can learn from the perspectives of experienced social entrepreneurs in terms of what to prepare for and expect so they can achieve their full entrepreneurial potential. It can also aid in further development of social entrepreneur curricula in business and non-business schools.

Originality/value

The existing literature does not portray sufficient detail about how social entrepreneurs live the lives they have created and chosen to understand their lived experiences. This study also provides a comprehensive definition of social entrepreneurship, incorporating “collective perspective” with a mentality of “it’s not about me, it’s about us”.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Olga Verkhohlyad and Gary N. McLean

This study aims to bring some additional insight into the issue of emigration by establishing a relationship between emigration and psychic return of citizens to their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to bring some additional insight into the issue of emigration by establishing a relationship between emigration and psychic return of citizens to their human capital investment in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

The article adopts a quantitative research strategy. It applies organizational commitment and human capital theories to the study of emigration.

Findings

The article provides evidence for the fact that psychic return to human capital investment in the country has significant relationship with emigration level from this country. At the same time, of all variables that comprise this type of return to HC investment, only two variables were found to be statistically significant: national GDP and access to education in the country.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide some evidence for the fact that emigration from a country cannot be reduced unless people in the country have the ability to lead an economically comfortable life and have access to education. Those countries that experience significant emigration need to turn their attention to developing and implementing sound economic and educational reforms. Emigration will be reduced as a result. A significant limitation of this research is the fact that not all the world countries were included in the analysis. Although the authors did their best to get data for as many countries as possible, the absence of data for some countries allowed for the research using fewer countries than desired.

Originality/value

This article utilizes organizational commitment and human capital theories. The combination of these two theories of social research allows a unique look at emigration.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 36 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2000

Johanna Fawkes and Anne Gregory

The Internet has brought about change in the way that public relations is practised. Not only has it provided another channel of communication, but the communication…

Abstract

The Internet has brought about change in the way that public relations is practised. Not only has it provided another channel of communication, but the communication dynamic itself has changed because of the Internet’s unique combination of characteristics. Much public relations practice is still posited on dated theories of the system of communication along the linear lines of sender, channel, receiver (with feedback). The public relations professional is there to transmit a message with the purpose of persuading publics to the point of view being promulgated. There have been suggestions that a new model of communication is required in order to explain the Internet medium. This paper re‐examines three of the older communication systems models to establish whether there are elements within them that can be helpful in explaining the dynamics of Internet‐based communication. The authors use the three models, in turn, to examine this medium by focusing on the message sender, the channel itself and the user of the Internet. The conclusion is that together they can throw valuable light on Internet‐based communication and that there are lessons to be drawn from these models that are useful for the contemporary public relations practitioner.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Rick Colbourne

Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid venture creation represents a significant opportunity for Indigenous peoples to build vibrant Indigenous-led economies that support…

Abstract

Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid venture creation represents a significant opportunity for Indigenous peoples to build vibrant Indigenous-led economies that support sustainable economic development and well-being. It is a means by which they can assert their rights to design, develop and maintain Indigenous-centric political, economic and social systems and institutions. In order to develop an integrated and comprehensive understanding of the intersection between Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid ventures, this chapter adopts a case study approach to examining Indigenous entrepreneurship and the underlying global trends that have influenced the design, structure and mission of Indigenous hybrid ventures. The cases present how Indigenous entrepreneurial ventures are, first and foremost, hybrid ventures that are responsive to community needs, values, cultures and traditions. They demonstrate that Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid ventures are more successful when the rights of Indigenous peoples are addressed and when these initiatives are led by or engage Indigenous communities. The chapter concludes with a conceptual model that can be applied to generate insights into the complex interrelationships and interdependencies that influence the formation of Indigenous hybrid ventures and value creation strategies according to three dimensions: (i) the overarching dimension of indigeneity and Indigenous rights; (ii) indigenous community orientations and (iii) indigenous hybrid venture creation considerations.

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Abstract

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Promotion, Recruitment and Retention of Members in Nonprofit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-659-7

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2020

Yenchun Jim Wu, Tienhua Wu and Jeremiah Sharpe

This study aims to reach academic consensus on key factors and boundaries used in defining the concepts of “social entrepreneurship” (SEsh), “social entrepreneur” (SE)…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reach academic consensus on key factors and boundaries used in defining the concepts of “social entrepreneurship” (SEsh), “social entrepreneur” (SE), and “social enterprise” (SEV). This study also explores the complex relationships among social/business enterprises, definitional categories and factors, missions, and impacts on effectiveness of practices and organizing for venture success.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis is conducted on articles published from 1998 to 2016 in peer-reviewed academic journals in the fields of management and organization. Furthermore, 80 articles are obtained and analyzed in terms of factors and frequently used terms for unified definitions and their intertwined linkages.

Findings

The unifying factors for the definitions of SEsh, SE, and SEV include primary mission and processes and resources. Strong linkages are observed between SEsh and actors, SE and characteristics, and SEV and organizational form. Results indicate that definitional categories and factors share numerous joint terms that can be used to propose unified definitions. This study identifies the effective interactions of variables among social mission, capabilities to manage resources and processes, entrepreneurial characteristics of actors, and forms of ventures in a process that provides potential for organizational sustainability and impact maximization.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to research by identifying clear and agreed-upon factors and traits as boundaries to propose definitions that can advance the legitimacy of social entrepreneurship as an academic field worthy of future exploration.

Practical implications

The findings emphasize social mission that achieves public benefits while preventing mission drift. Economic value and choice of organizational form can advance the fulfillment of objectives and governance practices. This study also presents the key influencing factors at various stages of an entrepreneurial process to determine how these concepts interact to increase the likelihood of organizational emergence and survival.

Originality/value

This work is the first to systematically review management and organizational literature on the key factors and terms that constitute the distinct definitions of SEsh, SE, and SEV and help clarify their complex relations in an entrepreneurial process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Manuel Vázquez-Zacarías, Alfonso López-Lira, Mario Vargas-Sáenz and John Macías-Prada

To succeed in acquiring appropriate resources, socially innovative firms must develop social capital, by making connections with traditional partners, such as universities…

Abstract

To succeed in acquiring appropriate resources, socially innovative firms must develop social capital, by making connections with traditional partners, such as universities and multinational corporations, and nontraditional partners, such as nongovernmental organizations and the communities in which they work. This study is designed to show the application of social capital through the pursuit of bilateral relationships. In addition, it shows that collaborations are possible among partners – pertaining to social innovative firms. This study begins with a conceptual foundation that is included to define key constructs and propositions. The methodology is a qualitative case study of socially innovative firms in the agriculture industry in Mexico and Colombia. Both case studies show the creation of bilateral alliances with traditional and nontraditional partners to obtain resources. Moreover, the findings suggest that a social firm can unite its partners’ objectives toward social value creation. Having a common ground could trigger multilateral collaborations among the socially innovative firm’s partners to combine, integrate, and leverage the business ecosystem. This chapter provides evidence that today’s social entrepreneurs are willing to use hybrid structures that include for-profit and nonprofit elements to provide a solution for a social issue.

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Regional Integration in Latin America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-159-0

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Laura Elizabeth Pinto and Levon Ellen Blue

This paper aims to explore Canadian in/exclusion of Aboriginal groups to/from access to mainstream business resources and opportunities. The focus is one prominent…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore Canadian in/exclusion of Aboriginal groups to/from access to mainstream business resources and opportunities. The focus is one prominent non-governmental program, the Canadian Aboriginal Prosperity and Entrepreneurship (CAPE) Fund, designed to provide equity to Aboriginal businesses. Do programs such as CAPE Fund promote Aboriginal entrepreneurship that liberates “others” on their own terms? or are they “civilizing missions” that attempt to impose Euro-centric practices and values?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors critically analyze the “promises” of entrepreneurship through CAPE Fund using TribalCrit, a framework rooted in critical race theory (CRT) and postcolonialism. The authors used a CRT research method highlighting two organizational narratives, describing CAPE Fund financing in two separate ventures. The research allowed to test the theory’s use in practical situations.

Findings

This paper develops a postcolonial conception of entrepreneurship to address the realities and needs of Aboriginal communities. Analysis of Canada’s CAPE Fund within two organizational narratives identified aspects of promise (active Aboriginal business ownership) and shortcomings (practices that attempted to erase inequity in ways that led to neocolonial subjugation).

Research limitations/implications

This paper attempts to build theory while engaging in CRT research that relies on organizational narratives. Narrative approaches offer depth of understanding but are not generalizable because of the limited scope of organizations studied.

Practical implications

The research methods used and framework developed offer researchers new approaches to better understand Indigenous and Aboriginal entrepreneurship outcomes. The findings point to specific Aboriginal funding issues that can be addressed by other funding agencies who wish to create more inclusive structures.

Social implications

Financial programs that might improve the possibility of self-determination of Aboriginal peoples within the postcolonial ideal must “hold both economic and non-economic objectives in tension” (Overall et al., 2010 p. 157) in ways that typically disadvantage Aboriginal entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This is the first, fully articulated framework for postcolonial entrepreneurship, grounded in CRT and applied to analyze Canada’s CAPE Fund.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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