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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

John J. Augenstein and M. William Konnert

This study was built upon earlier research by Ronald Blood, WilliamGreenfield Jr. and Harry F. Wolcott and explored the informalsocialisation of first, second, and third…

Abstract

This study was built upon earlier research by Ronald Blood, William Greenfield Jr. and Harry F. Wolcott and explored the informal socialisation of first, second, and third year Ohio Catholic elementary school principals. It identified the significant others and socialisation stages of 25 selected socialisation content items for the position. The items were related to four dimensions of their roles: i.e. personnel relations, administration/ management, curriculum/supervision and religious leadership. The investigation also reaffirmed the development of an “administrative perspective”.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Anna Gotlib

In this chapter, I consider how voluntarily childless (VC) women can respond not just to master narratives of mandatory motherhood, but to their own internalised…

Abstract

In this chapter, I consider how voluntarily childless (VC) women can respond not just to master narratives of mandatory motherhood, but to their own internalised narratives of wantonness – of not desiring something they ought, or of being ambivalent about motherhood altogether. This chapter, then, is about the practices of choosing and endorsing one’s desires, however clear or ambiguous, about intentional childlessness, and in the process, of learning to hold oneself as a valued moral agent, as a dissident, but non-wanton, self. Secondarily, it is also about challenging Frankfurt’s claims that the formation and maintenance of moral identities require a kind of wholeheartedness that admits of no doubts. First, I begin with a personal story of my struggles with desiring my choices – of coming to endorse, however not-wholeheartedly, my non-wanting of motherhood, and thus rejecting the pronatalist narratives that marked my first-order desires as mistaken, and my second-order ones as deviant. Second, I offer an overview of voluntary childlessness as experienced by women most pressured to reproduce in the context of the bad moral luck of pronatalism. I note that my approach, grounded in philosophical feminist value theory, is focused on women who are not involuntarily childless or infertile, and who, because of social, economic and other privilege find themselves to be the targets of pronatalist narratives of ‘desirable’ motherhood. Finally, I conclude with a discussion of the dissident practices of identity-creation through which women can embrace both their certainties and ambiguities about their VC status by offering counterstories in response to accusations of wanton-hood, or of improperly, unnaturally or heretically motivated wills.

Details

Voluntary and Involuntary Childlessness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-362-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Hana Krskova, Chris Baumann, Yvonne Breyer and Leigh Norma Wood

Human capital theory suggests that any increase in skills translates into greater productivity of the workforce. Non-cognitive skills, in particular, play a critical role…

Abstract

Purpose

Human capital theory suggests that any increase in skills translates into greater productivity of the workforce. Non-cognitive skills, in particular, play a critical role in many domains in life. The aim of this study is to gain a greater understanding of one such skill, discipline. Viewing discipline as a tool for enhancing learning, personal development and increasing overall achievement, this study offers an alternative way to measure discipline in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the results of an online survey of 537 current students and recent graduates from the United States, South Korea and China. Principal component analysis was used to test the overarching assumption that student discipline is composed of five dimensions. Multiple analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc analyses and t-tests were applied to test for country and gender-related differences between the three country groups. Cluster analysis was used to profile the respondent groups based on similarities across the samples.

Findings

The results confirm that student discipline is a construct comprising five discipline dimensions – focus, intention, responsibility, structure and time (F.I.R.S.T). In addition, the identification of low, medium and high discipline levels among the respondents provides support for the recently introduced concept of a layered “threshold of Discipline”.

Originality/value

A F.I.R.S.T. discipline measurement questionnaire for capturing student discipline – underpinned by a conceptual model encompassing self-determination, goal setting, self-efficacy, self-regulation and time management principles – was developed and tested. Suggestions for enhancing graduate work readiness through increasing levels of the skill of discipline are outlined.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

C. Cryss Brunner

Despite widespread concern about the need to ensure that women succeed in superintendency positions, there is woefully little relevant literature. This paper presents the…

1038

Abstract

Despite widespread concern about the need to ensure that women succeed in superintendency positions, there is woefully little relevant literature. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study of female superintendents focused on identifying their strategies for success. In broad strokes, the study draws on the insights of 12 women superintendents and 24 people who knew them. Interpretations are presented as they find expression in seven “strategies for success”.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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