Search results

1 – 10 of over 75000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Johnnie Stark and Jin Gyu “Phillip” Park

This longitudinal study assessed student perceptions of sustainable design issues in the context of an accredited interior design program. Although literature exists…

Abstract

Purpose

This longitudinal study assessed student perceptions of sustainable design issues in the context of an accredited interior design program. Although literature exists documenting the integration of sustainable strategies into interior design curriculum, more analysis is needed to determine the impact of program experiences on students’ attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

Over a four-year period, a questionnaire was administered to 245 freshmen in an introduction to interior design survey course and to 122 seniors enrolled in a professional practice in interior design seminar. In addition to statistically analyzing category responses between the two subject groups, the authors also looked for patterns in responses within each subject group.

Findings

Results indicated that the seniors were significantly more aware of the term “sustainable design” than the freshmen were. Understanding the students’ perceptions of more specific principles including life cycle thinking, environmentally and socially responsible materials sourcing and sustainable design practice required a more nuanced discussion. Although statistical significance of differences between the two groups was small to moderate throughout the survey categories, the seniors tended to be more deliberate in their responses.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to conduct a longitudinal investigation of an interior design student body from freshman through senior cohorts regarding perceptions of sustainable design. Findings from the large sample size provide direction for interior design programs and form the basis for further study.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

DongHee Kim and SooCheong (Shawn) Jang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of three types of perceived healthiness (physical, psychological and economic health) on restaurant consumption…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of three types of perceived healthiness (physical, psychological and economic health) on restaurant consumption activities among senior consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 325 restaurant customers in the USA through a Web-based survey conducted by an online marketing research firm. Following previous studies’ categorization of senior consumers, this study distinguished between “senior consumers” (age 60 or older) and “younger consumers” (age 39 or younger) to better compare different age-related behaviors. A series of two-way ANOVA was conducted for dining-out frequency and the number of choice sets.

Findings

The results revealed that senior diners’ perceptions of healthiness are critical in determining senior consumers’ restaurant behaviors, such as information processing and purchasing behaviors. The results provide evidence that seniors with a positive perception of their physical and psychological status seek a greater number of alternative restaurant choices, which is actively related to purchasing frequency.

Practical implications

The managerial implications indicate that restaurant marketers should avoid stereotypes and instead rely on more recent and accurate information regarding today’s senior consumers.

Originality/value

The position taken in this study recognizes the need to enhance the understanding of senior consumers’ patterns regarding their perceived physical, psychological and economic health. To the best of authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to investigate the impact of three types of health on seniors’ dining behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Mark P. Healey, Gerard P. Hodgkinson and Sebastiano Massaro

In response to recent calls to better understand the brain’s role in organizational behavior, we propose a series of theoretical tests to examine the question “can brains…

Abstract

In response to recent calls to better understand the brain’s role in organizational behavior, we propose a series of theoretical tests to examine the question “can brains manage?” Our tests ask whether brains can manage without bodies and without extracranial resources, whether they can manage in social isolation, and whether brains are the ultimate controllers of emotional and cognitive aspects of organizational behavior. Our analysis shows that, to accomplish work-related tasks in organizations, the brain relies on and closely interfaces with the body, interpersonal and social dynamics, and cognitive and emotional processes that are distributed across persons and artifacts. The results of this “thought experiment” suggest that the brain is more appropriately conceived as a regulatory organ that integrates top-down (i.e., social, artifactual and environmental) and bottom-up (i.e., neural) influences on organizational behavior, rather than the sole cause of that behavior. Drawing on a socially situated perspective, our analysis develops a framework that connects brain, body and mind to social, cultural, and environmental forces, as significant components of complex emotional and cognitive organizational systems. We discuss the implications for the emerging field of organizational cognitive neuroscience and for conceptualizing the interaction between the brain, cognition and emotion in organizations.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

M. K. Ward, Stefan Volk and William J. Becker

This chapter overviews organizational neuroscience (ON), covering the past, present, and future of this growing field of inquiry. First, we define ON and clarify the…

Abstract

This chapter overviews organizational neuroscience (ON), covering the past, present, and future of this growing field of inquiry. First, we define ON and clarify the boundaries of the field. Second, we describe the evolution of ON by starting with early papers that tended to discuss the potential of ON to benefit both research and practice. Throughout its development, debates have abounded about the value of ON. Such debates are often related to challenges in collecting, integrating, interpreting, and using information from the brain-level of analysis. It is time for the field to move beyond these debates to focus on applying neuroscience to further theory development and reveal more comprehensive answers to research questions of importance to both academics and practitioners. Third, we propose and describe future research directions for ON. The research directions that we propose are merely a sample of the many paths along which ON inquiry can move forward. Fourth, we outline potential practical implications of ON, including: training and development, job design, high-performance assessment, motivating communications, and conflict prevention. Finally, we draw conclusions about ON as it stands today, address challenges in developing ON, and point out opportunities. We conclude with takeaways and highlight the importance of ON for both academics and practitioners.

Details

Organizational Neuroscience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-430-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2018

Rachel Calipha, David M. Brock, Ahron Rosenfeld and Dov Dvir

The acquisition of knowledge through mergers and acquisition (M&A) may not create value—usually because the knowledge may not be transferred, or transferred but not…

Abstract

Purpose

The acquisition of knowledge through mergers and acquisition (M&A) may not create value—usually because the knowledge may not be transferred, or transferred but not integrated. The purpose of this paper to develop and test a theoretical model of knowledge and performance in the M&A process.

Design/methodology/approach

Theory, model and case analysis.

Findings

The literature review led us to distinguish between three main categories of knowledge along the different stages of the M&A process: acquired knowledge in the pre-merger stage; and transferred knowledge and integrated knowledge in the post-merger stage. The application of the model is illustrated in a case study of technology M&A, which includes data collected from annual reports before and after the merger.

Research limitations/implications

The model recommends acknowledging the differences between the acquired knowledge, transferred knowledge and integrated knowledge when examining the relationship between knowledge and performance in M&As. In addition, the model suggests considering several factors that influence future knowledge integration in the pre-merger stage. Ignoring the three categories and the factors may be the reason for the reports of previous studied stating that the acquisition of knowledge-based resources is associated with negative announcement returns to the acquiring firm.

Originality/value

The paper presents new procedures to measure knowledge, collecting data on R&D employees by using annual reports. In addition, the paper suggests adding “in-process R&D” as an “Acquired Knowledge” measure.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1973

ALEC M HUGHES

The three reviews which follow are about the first of what will be a longer series of filmed interviews with leading figures in industry and commerce. Ian Latimer…

Abstract

The three reviews which follow are about the first of what will be a longer series of filmed interviews with leading figures in industry and commerce. Ian Latimer, producer of the series, says that the idea for the series came to him after a screening of one of the earlier Rank management films to some senior executives. One man, who had built up a large organisation confided to Latimer that the turning point in his career came when one morning, as a young ambitious executive he decided that he must organise his own time much better if he were to get anywhere. He did so and did get somewhere! The film he had just seen was TIME TO THINK! Latimer thought, therefore, that interviews with successful senior managers might provide not only interesting material in its own right but also some valuable advice for middle management.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 5 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2020

Linzi J Kemp

The purpose of this conceptual paper was to investigate the contribution of the “Pipeline”, as a metaphor for building theory about Women-on-Boards (WoB) in the Arab world.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper was to investigate the contribution of the “Pipeline”, as a metaphor for building theory about Women-on-Boards (WoB) in the Arab world.

Design/methodology/approach

Narratives about women's progress in Arab countries were collected from a range of sources and content was analysed to identify emergent themes about pipeline.

Findings

Themes were identified of the pipeline metaphor that explained phenomena and generated solutions to employ, retain and advance women to board directorships; from higher education (“bulging”/“bursting” pipeline) through employment (“leaking” pipeline) to boardroom (“blocked” pipeline).

Research limitations/implications

Generalisation of these study results is limited by geographical context of this research. An implication is for further international studies on metaphor identification for women's progress.

Practical implications

Relevant metaphor-in-use required to generate company policy and praxis towards WoB in the Arab world.

Originality/value

The first academic study to investigate the value of metaphor for effect on women's progress in Arab countries. Novel metaphor identification is proposed to think and see women's experiences in cultural context.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Arthur Seakhoa-King, Marcjanna M Augustyn and Peter Mason

Abstract

Details

Tourism Destination Quality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-558-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Mahmud Al Masum and Lee D. Parker

While the world-wide adoption of international financial reporting standards (IFRS) aims to eliminate differences in national accounting standards between countries, the…

Abstract

Purpose

While the world-wide adoption of international financial reporting standards (IFRS) aims to eliminate differences in national accounting standards between countries, the socio-political institutions surrounding financial reporting practices remain localised. This paper aims to penetrate and reveal the manner in which local national context, stakeholder intentions and financial reporting practices can moderate the compliance with IFRS in a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview-based qualitative research framework was used to analyse the experience and attitudes of accountants, auditors and financial reporting regulators during a passage of accounting reform initiatives.

Findings

This paper provides a critical analysis of the financial reporting practices of a developing country that has ostensibly implemented accounting reforms prescribed by the World Bank. It has revealed the key firm- and field-level logics that are experienced and managed by regulators and corporate managers in their approaches to financial reporting and accountability. The World Bank-led accounting reform can be constrained by a complex mix of institutional logics originating from market and corporate structures, networks of institutionalised family and political relationships, professional and regulatory structure and resourcing limitations and cultural business conventions. This paper provides evidence of firm- and field-level logics that contest and influence the emergence of a financial reporting oversight body and lead to highly variable compliance with international accounting standards.

Originality/value

This paper aims to extend our knowledge beyond broad national-level elements of institutional orders. It presents a more penetrating examination of the existence and contestation of logics originating from various local and global actors and interests. It presents a theoretical mapping of institutional logics, which operate in international and local settings and also encompass firm- and field-level imperatives. Any effort to understand and improve accounting practices of a developing country need to consider the power, contestation and influence of multiple logics operating in its institutional environment.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Catherine Simpson Bueker

This case study explores the ways in which black and Latino women who graduated from a predominantly white, elite public high school in the Northeastern United States…

Abstract

This case study explores the ways in which black and Latino women who graduated from a predominantly white, elite public high school in the Northeastern United States engaged in varied acts of resistance while students there, both within the classroom and within the larger community. The women accessed the high school through one of the three ways: as town residents, as commuters, or as boarders through two distinct voluntary racial desegregation programs. Through in-depth interviews with 37 women, two overriding trends appear in the data – a form of “resistance for liberation” or “political resistance” in which women push against stereotypes, introduce new programming, and work to reform policies and curriculum, and a smaller strain of “resistance for survival” in which women actively utilize stereotypes. Women with greater amounts of both dominant and nondominant forms of cultural capital are more likely to engage in “political resistance,” while women with lesser amounts of dominant cultural capital show more evidence of “resistance for survival.” Variation exists by point of entry into the system, with town residents showing the lowest levels of either form of resistance.

Details

The Power of Resistance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-462-6

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 75000