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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Jamee Pelcher, Brian P. McCullough and Sylvia Trendafilova

The purpose of this paper is to examine higher education institutions’ participation in association for the advancement of sustainability in higher education’s (AASHE’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine higher education institutions’ participation in association for the advancement of sustainability in higher education’s (AASHE’s) Green Athletics category in the sustainability tracking, assessment and rating system (STARS) sustainability report while assessing how well collegiate athletic departments engage with their respective aspects.

Design/methodology/approach

This general review used quantitative content analysis to determine the number of NCAA Divisions I–III institutions that actively report Green Athletics categories in their AASHE STARS reports. The data collection process compiled current reports from the STARS website and the National Collegiate Athletic Association database. Green Athletics categorical and accumulated point attempts and outcomes were analyzed.

Findings

Of the 335 institutions that actively use the STARS reporting tool, the NCAA accounted for 247 rated institutions of which only 50 attempted points in Green Athletics while only 21 institutions succeeded. This paper discusses the lack of participation from institutions in Green Athletics and propose an alternate to better engage collegiate athletics in STARS reporting.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first known examinations of the tangible results of collaborations on college campuses to integrate the athletic department’s sustainability efforts into the overall sustainability reporting of the institution. This study can better inform STARS on how to more fully engage college athletic departments and boost the sustainability efforts in all corners of campus.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Abstract

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Ethics and Integrity in Research with Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-401-1

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Abstract

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Empirical Nursing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-814-9

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Sarah Burch and Abiodun Blessing Osaiyuwu

This chapter draws on experiences of research with children who work as street traders in Nigeria, with a focus on establishing trust and the related concepts of power and…

Abstract

This chapter draws on experiences of research with children who work as street traders in Nigeria, with a focus on establishing trust and the related concepts of power and rights. The discussion stems from a study which used a rights-based approach to gather children’s accounts of their experiences of working as street traders within a large market in a Nigerian city. Seventeen children (aged 10–15 years) took part in semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Children talked about difficult situations as they undertook tiring work and received conflicting messages about the importance of making an economic contribution to the family, versus the need to attend school. Researching these accounts entailed a number of ethical challenges, which centred on access and recruitment; consent/assent and participation; sensitivity of research; and researcher positionality. First, recruitment was limited to children with parents/guardians who could give consent, with assent from the children. Second, a relationship of trust had to be negotiated between the researcher and the participating children. This involved acknowledging different elements of adult–child positionality, which had implications for the ways in which children participated in the study. Third, sensitivity was essential given that children could discuss attitudes or activities, which were not universally seen as acceptable. Fourth, researcher positionality influenced all aspects of the study, including access to children, how relationships were forged and the interpretation of data. All of these challenges relied heavily on building trust with children. However, the authors illustrate how trust must be employed cautiously in research with children, given adult–child power disparities.

Details

Ethics and Integrity in Research with Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-401-1

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Zoé Moody, Frédéric Darbellay, Sara Camponovo, Ayuko Berchtold-Sedooka and Philip D. Jaffé

This chapter aims to present and critically question the work undertaken with a group of children as experts in a transdisciplinary research project, ‘Exploring the way to…

Abstract

This chapter aims to present and critically question the work undertaken with a group of children as experts in a transdisciplinary research project, ‘Exploring the way to and from school with children: An interdisciplinary approach of children’s experiences of the third place’. The project is funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation.1 A partnership was established between the research team and a group of 10 children (11–12 years old). The children were actively involved as co-researchers to provide the research team with expertise regarding their experiences of the school journey. Their roles as co-researchers included refining the research questions and methodological tools, analysing data, and drafting final recommendations. In this chapter, the authors outline the different stages of this transdisciplinary partnership with children as co-researchers, whilst addressing some key issues encountered during the process, including: What is expertise? When, and under what conditions, can children genuinely be co-researchers? What ethical aspects should be considered? The authors commence with an outline of the project’s theoretical framework before detailing how the participatory process enabled children to actively take part and give their views on the research. The authors address a specific focus on the ethical challenges encountered as part of the complexities of conducting research with children. They conclude with some reflections on the benefits of involving children as co-researchers and, in doing so, offer a critique of the notion of ‘expertise’ in research with children.

Details

Ethics and Integrity in Research with Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-401-1

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Tiberio Daddi, Francesco Rizzi, Gaia Pretner, Niccolò Todaro, Eleonora Annunziata, Marco Frey and Fabio Iraldo

The relation between sport and sustainability is a topic that has recently raised a lot of interest among both academics and practitioners. However, in the academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The relation between sport and sustainability is a topic that has recently raised a lot of interest among both academics and practitioners. However, in the academic literature, very few studies have investigated which solutions are implemented in football, despite its popularity, to reduce the environmental impact of its events. This study contributes to filling this gap by exploring how stadium managers tackle environmental issues for football events.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have analyzed 94 sustainability reports of major sports events and conducted 6 case studies in 6 different major league stadiums around Europe in the framework of research supported by UEFA and three EU National Football Associations.

Findings

The heterogeneity of practices and goals at both the governance and operational level denote that stadium managers pursue environmental objectives mainly voluntarily and under local pressures. Efforts toward environmental improvement appear to depend on an economic and efficiency rationale, which translates into the adoption of technologies and operational practices characterized by short-term economic returns (i.e. energy and resources savings). As a result, operational practices outnumber governance-level practices.

Practical implications

The analysis clearly highlights that the fragmentation of operational practices derives from a lack of maturity of governance structures, especially when multiple actors have different – yet mutually influencing – responsibilities on the infrastructures or the planning and staging of football events.

Originality/value

Building on the notion of the holistic approach to environmental sustainability in sport management the research differentiated environmental practices according to the operational and governance dimensions. While operational practices tackle environmental aspects directly associated with football events (e.g. waste, energy consumption, water usage, etc.), governance-level practices relate to the systemic allocation of environmental roles and responsibilities within the management structure underlying football events.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

M. McSherry, C. Fitzpatrick and E. Lewis

There are various temperature measuring systems presented in the literature and on the market today. Over the past number of years a range of luminescent‐based optical…

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Abstract

Purpose

There are various temperature measuring systems presented in the literature and on the market today. Over the past number of years a range of luminescent‐based optical fibre sensors have been reported and developed which include fluorescence and optical scattering. These temperature sensors incorporate materials that emit wavelength shifted light when excited by an optical source. The majority of commercially available systems are based on fluorescent properties.Design/methodology/approach – Many published journal articles and conference papers were investigated and existing temperature sensors in the market were examined.Findings – In optical thermometry, the light is used to carry temperature information. In many cases optical fibres are used to transmit and receive this light. Optical fibres are immune to electromagnetic interference and are small in size, which allows them to make very localized measurements. A temperature sensitive material forms a sensor and the subsequent optical data are transmitted via optical fibres to electronic detection systems. Two keys areas were investigated namely fluorescence based temperature sensors and temperature sensors involving optical scattering.Originality/value – An overview of optical fibre temperature sensors based on luminescence is presented. This review provides a summary of optical temperature sensors, old and new which exist in today's world of sensing.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2019

Katherine Leanne Christ, Kathyayini Kathy Rao and Roger Leonard Burritt

Given the impending introduction of legislation requiring large Australian listed companies to make supply chain disclosures about modern slavery, the paper aims to reveal…

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3111

Abstract

Purpose

Given the impending introduction of legislation requiring large Australian listed companies to make supply chain disclosures about modern slavery, the paper aims to reveal current voluntary practice. The purpose of this paper is to provide a benchmark for assessing the current engagement of large companies with modern slavery in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Institutional theory provides the foundation for assessing current voluntary practice in relation to modern slavery disclosures by large Australian listed companies. Content analysis is used to identify quantity and quality of modern slavery disclosures of the top 100 companies listed on the Australian Stock Exchange. The contents of annual and standalone reports available on websites, as well as other online disclosures, are examined using terms associated with modern slavery identified from the literature.

Findings

Evidence gathered about modern slavery disclosures by ASX 100 companies shows information in annual and standalone reports reveal far less than other disclosures on company websites. Overall, the volume and quality of disclosures are low and, where made, narrative. A wide range of themes on modern slavery are disclosed with bribery and corruption and human rights issues dominant. Although currently in line with institutional theory, as there appear to be mimetic processes encouraging disclosure, results support the idea that legislation is needed to encourage further engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a baseline of understanding about the volume and quality of modern slavery disclosures as a foundation for future research into the practices of Australian companies prior to the signalled introduction of legislation mandating reporting. It also identifies potential lines of research. The sample only examines large Australian listed companies which restricts generalisation from the results.

Originality/value

This is the first academic research paper to examine quantity and quality of modern slavery disclosures of large Australian companies. Results add support for the introduction of legislation by government.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Igor S. Nadezhdin, Aleksey G. Goryunov and Yuliya Yu Nadezhdina

This paper aims to focus on the development of an optical concentration sensor designed for measuring the concentration of components in solutions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the development of an optical concentration sensor designed for measuring the concentration of components in solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The operating principle of the developed sensor is based on the Bouguer–Lambert–Beer law. An optical measuring system using fiber optical cables was used for the practical implementation of the concentration sensor.

Findings

As a result of fiber optical cable use in the concentration sensor, the remote measurement principle was implemented, ensuring the instrument’s reliability and the reduction of operating costs.

Originality/value

The advantage of the proposed measuring system is that the sensitive element is maintenance-free, does not require power supply and can operate under severe industrial conditions. Using a fiber optic cable to transmit a light signal allows placing the sensitive element at a distance of several tens of meters from the electronics unit (the smart part).

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2018

Mohit Goswami

The purpose of this paper is to formulate extended enterprise-oriented structure and process map for technical skill building for firms belonging to emerging economies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to formulate extended enterprise-oriented structure and process map for technical skill building for firms belonging to emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify technical skill building (lies at the intersection of product, process and people) as a key enabler for furthering organizational competitiveness. The authors employ define measure explore develop implement- and supplier, input, process, output, and customer (SIPOC-) based framework for arriving at a technical skill building framework.

Findings

By utilizing the SIPOC-based framework, the authors identify the supplier(s), input(s), process(s), output(s) and customer(s) in the value chain of technical skill building as far as the extended enterprise is concerned.

Originality/value

The paper uses pragmatic and user-friendly conceptualization for technical skill building framework.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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