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Quality Services and Experiences in Hospitality and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-384-1

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Article

Jon Coaffee and Lorraine Johnston

Seeks to analyse the complexity of current practices surrounding the management and governance of urban regeneration activities in the UK. In particular, aims to focus on…

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to analyse the complexity of current practices surrounding the management and governance of urban regeneration activities in the UK. In particular, aims to focus on the potential of initiatives decentralised to the sub‐local level that have been designed both to effectively manage public service provision and to improve citizen participation in local government management decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

Explores the early experiences of local authorities' attempts to introduce “area committees” in line with the complex “modernisation” agendas advanced by the “New Labour” government under an overarching project of “new localism”.

Findings

Highlights that new attempts at devolving power and responsibility to these sub‐local structures should be more flexible to local conditions rather than directed by national policy.

Originality/value

Argues for a “middle way” to be adopted in managing local government and governance changes in order to develop a more “pragmatic localism”.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Microelectronics International, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Article

Nola Hewitt‐Dundas

This paper develops a typology of strategic options for small firms in the furniture industry and examines the extent to which firms are re‐engineering their strategies in…

Abstract

This paper develops a typology of strategic options for small firms in the furniture industry and examines the extent to which firms are re‐engineering their strategies in response to profit performance. Empirical analysis is based on data from 39 firms with between 10 and 100 employees in the Irish furniture industry. Three main results emerge from the analysis. First, firms in the Irish furniture industry predominantly adopt “simple” business development strategies. Secondly, in terms of profit performance, we find no evidence that simple strategies unambiguously outperform more complex approaches. Instead, the success of both simple and complex business strategies is directly related to the strength of firms’ resource base. Finally, systematic differences were found in firms’ ability or willingness to re‐engineer their strategies in the light of their profit performance.

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Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Book part

Farida Azhar-Hewitt and Kenneth Hewitt

The paper looks at local experience and concerns in environmental disasters in the upper Indus Basin, widely thought to become more serious due to climate change. Emphasis…

Abstract

The paper looks at local experience and concerns in environmental disasters in the upper Indus Basin, widely thought to become more serious due to climate change. Emphasis is on the lives and livelihoods, responses, and concerns of those most affected. Several events and their contexts are examined. They highlight socially distributed and differentiated risks, losses, adaptive capacities, and available or absent protections. Cases at the village level underline problems relating to aspects of women's work and health; and how, while traditional practices are being enforced to ensure their continued seclusion and subordination, the villages and men's work are increasingly drawn into the modern economy and modernizing developments. Often these trends undermine traditional risk-averse practices but fail to provide alternatives. Some larger disasters reveal a disconnect between research and official responses, and expose the needs of local communities, whether in villages or mountain towns. This study examines how exposure and vulnerability to environmental dangers are a social construct. It leads to an argument for the “professional ear” in these contexts, finding ways to listen to those rarely heard, and translations that respect their concerns. Such work looks at conditions essentially invisible to climate models, and differing in character and approach. Arguably, it should come ahead of attempts to use model results to propose adaptive responses in these contexts.

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Climate Change Modeling For Local Adaptation In The Hindu Kush-Himalayan Region
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-487-0

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Article

Helen Frost, Sally Haw and John Frank

The population of older people in the UK is expected to rise rapidly over the next 20 years and therefore identification of effective interventions that prevent functional…

Abstract

Purpose

The population of older people in the UK is expected to rise rapidly over the next 20 years and therefore identification of effective interventions that prevent functional decline and disablement is a public health priority. This review summarises the evidence for interventions in community settings that aim to prevent or delay disablement in later life.

Design/methodology/approach

A search of review‐level literature was conducted for the period September 1999 and 2009 of Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases. It included interventions that aimed to prevent disablement of community dwelling older people (50+ years old). It excluded interventions carried out in institutional care and those focused on specific disease. The reviews were screened using the AMSTAR assessment tool.

Findings

The search identified 62 reviews of complex interventions (preventative home visits (n=9), integrated service delivery/case management and comprehensive geriatric assessment (n=6), falls prevention (n=17), exercise (n=15), nutritional needs (n=3), medication review (n=2), telecare/telehealth (n=5), social integration interventions (n=3) and vision screening (n=2).

Originality/value to Conclusion

The review identified many areas of unknown effectiveness, partly due to unstandardised use of outcomes and poor experimental design. The most promising complex interventions include: assessment of risk factors; and direct referral to an easily accessible, comprehensive range of interventions that are tailored to need and include long‐term follow up. There is consistent evidence that exercise can be beneficial, particularly in preventing falls, but overall, the evidence‐base for other specific interventions is limited.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article

Philippa Miskelly, Ngaire Kerse and Janine Wiles

Managing patients in advanced age is complex, especially when it comes to multi-morbidities and polypharmacy. The purpose of this qualitative study is to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Managing patients in advanced age is complex, especially when it comes to multi-morbidities and polypharmacy. The purpose of this qualitative study is to investigate challenges, opportunities and potential solutions from a primary healthcare provider perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Fifty-seven participants joined in group discussions on challenges and opportunities of working with advanced age. Participants included general practitioners (GPs), practice nurses, students and administration staff working in ten general practices. A thematic analysis was developed, supported by NVivo software.

Findings

Poor lines of communication and fragmentation of services between differing levels of health care services available for older people were highlighted. This has implications for quality of care and equity of services. Participants also reported challenges in treatment and funding regimes.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size and regional nature of the study, along with the semi-structured nature of the group discussions and rigorous thematic analysis, indicate that this qualitative data is transferable, dependable, confirmable and credible. Comparing the views of tertiary and community services would be useful.

Practical implications

A range of potential strategies and solutions to the current fragmented services was offered by GPs. For example, adequately funded and staffed community-based health hubs; IT platforms enabling timely flow of patient information between primary and tertiary health providers and creation of medical, nursing and allied health roles aimed at improving synergy between GP and tertiary services.

Originality/value

Obtaining the perspectives of general practice highlights the challenges and complexities of caring for those in advanced age brings. These insights have not been previously been explored in-depth within this setting in New Zealand.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article

Nicholas Chileshe, Raufdeen Rameezdeen, M. Reza Hosseini, Steffen Lehmann and Chika Udeaja

A large number of benefits have been reported when reverse logistics (RL) is fully implemented in the construction industry. However, RL is yet to become common place in…

Abstract

Purpose

A large number of benefits have been reported when reverse logistics (RL) is fully implemented in the construction industry. However, RL is yet to become common place in the construction sector, particularly in Australia. The particular sub-sector in which RL operates is small and weak and the remainder of the sector must embrace and accommodate it comfortably. Research is lacking on how to promoting RL in the construction industry. Very little has been done to identify the current practices that have the potential to promote RL industry-wide. The purpose of this paper is to identify the practices that work well in the sector, a strategy could be mapped out to promote RL to all stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to fill the above gap, the present study used a mixed method approach to gather and evaluate current practices and their potential to promote RL in South Australia’s construction industry. Practices that were identified using a comprehensive literature review were evaluated with a questionnaire survey and series of interviews involving construction professionals.

Findings

The findings are that practices facilitating deconstruction is the most important, followed by practices facilitating the use of salvaged materials in new construction to promote RL in South Australia. Awareness of deconstruction benefits, challenges and procedures at the organisation level and facilities and services at industry level were associated with RL implementation. Availability of salvaged materials in the market was found to influence its use in new construction and as a consequence its demand. Designing for reverse logistics is another practice that could facilitate deconstruction and the onus of its promotion lies mainly with the designers.

Research limitations/implications

This research was confined to one state in Australia. As such the generalisation to other states and other countries should be treated cautiously.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can help inform the industry and its stakeholders on areas that they need to concentrate more on to make the South Australian construction industry a fully RL integrated one. To that end the authors propose some recommendations arising from the findings reported here.

Originality/value

This study makes a contribution to the body of knowledge on reserve logistics within a previously unexplored South Australian context. In addition, the study provides valuable insights into the contribution of RL practices to the construction industry.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Marion Ellison

This paper sets out to explore the relationship between gender, New Public Management (NPM), citizenship and professional and user group identities and relationships…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to explore the relationship between gender, New Public Management (NPM), citizenship and professional and user group identities and relationships within child care social work practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises findings from a major comparative survey undertaken in Denmark and the UK as part of Doctoral research. In addition the paper draws upon more recent empirical research carried out by the author in Sweden.

Findings

Paradigms imported from the private sector have led to the adoption of NPM, fiscal austerity and the reorganisation of childcare social work throughout Europe. This paper illustrates the connectivities between NPM, gender, citizenship and the contested terrains within which professional and user group relationships and identities are being forged. The paper offers a unique insight into the operationalisation of NPM and gender within childcare professional social work practice in different European settings.

Research limitations/implications

The paper's findings may be used to contribute to existing theoretical and empirical knowledge within the field of professional childcare social work and practice.

Originality/value

The paper offers a unique insight into the operationalisation of gender equality as a normative ideal premised on the development of organisational and legal settings which embrace an awareness of the duality of public and private spheres and the impact of different European welfare settings on the articulations of notions of gender and citizenship, which in turn operationalise processes of inclusion and exclusion of women as citizens, workers and parents.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article

Mark Llewellyn, Marcus Longley, Paul Jarvis and Tony Garthwaite

The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of a comprehensive and independent study of 1,029 older people who receive home care in Wales. The study aims to expand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of a comprehensive and independent study of 1,029 older people who receive home care in Wales. The study aims to expand knowledge on the views of older people, a group who traditionally have struggled to make their voices heard. It asked older people about six specific components of home care: being listened to; having trained, knowledgeable and skilled care workers; having enough time to be cared for; receiving care from as few different workers as possible; receiving quality care; and being signposted to other sources of information.

Design/methodology/approach

After an initial literature review and period of analysis, a thematic framework for home care was developed which contained the six components described above. A questionnaire was subsequently designed and distributed via the post to all home care services over 65 years old in four local authorities across Wales. A sample response rate of 26.7 per cent was achieved.

Findings

The paper provides evidence on the levels of satisfaction (or otherwise) with the home care received by older people in Wales. Overall, nearly 85 per cent of older people are either “satisfied” or “very satisfied”, and given the sample size these data are significant (within appropriate confidence intervals) for the whole of the 25,000 people who receive home care in Wales. However, it is difficult to contextualise these findings given that there are no effective comparator data.

Research limitations/implications

Given the chosen research approach, the results may lack a certain depth of understanding. That said, the size of the sample does provide commissioners and providers of services with certainty about the general population view.

Originality/value

This paper offers a unique independent analysis of home care in Wales, and provides the reader with detailed insights into the views of older people who rarely get a chance to be heard.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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