Search results

1 – 10 of 195
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

M. Hayter and M. Heery

In commerce and industry, senior managers are starting to make extensive personal use of microcomputers. Such tasks as diary maintenance, word processing, electronic…

Abstract

In commerce and industry, senior managers are starting to make extensive personal use of microcomputers. Such tasks as diary maintenance, word processing, electronic messaging, spreadsheet applications and even expert systems are becoming commonplace. Are these developments reflected in the way senior library managers in the UK are using IT? A six‐month British Library funded project, based at Bristol Polytechnic Library, has surveyed the UK academic sector and has examined case studies of particularly interesting applications. This paper presents a summary of the project's findings and discusses what needs to be done to encourage more widespread use of microcomputers by senior library managers.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Vandra Harris and Swornima Tuladhar

Achieving localisation (the transfer of control to local actors) has proven extremely challenging in the development sector, and the humanitarian sector appears to be…

Abstract

Achieving localisation (the transfer of control to local actors) has proven extremely challenging in the development sector, and the humanitarian sector appears to be facing equal challenges. This chapter seeks to engage with that struggle and examine why this lesson has been so difficult to learn. Drawing on conference workshops and 10 key informant interviews, this paper examines the obstacles and opportunities for localisation, seeking to understand what makes it so hard for those who hold disproportionate power in humanitarian encounters to hand over power. The authors found a clear sense of localisation being a process rather than an outcome; optimism that momentum is slowly gathering towards this process, and a clear sense of the steps required to fully achieve it. Examining practitioners’ perspectives in this way adds an important voice to discussions of humanitarian practice.

Details

Ethics in a Crowded World: Globalisation, Human Movement and Professional Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-008-5

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1981

D.M. Hayter

A variety of published material is available from which the value, volume and direction of UK international trade can be readily determined. However, this information…

Abstract

A variety of published material is available from which the value, volume and direction of UK international trade can be readily determined. However, this information provides a measure of freight movements across a UK trade boundary (ports, airports) only, and allows no straightforward means of determining the magnitude and origins of international freight flows inland of such boundaries.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 11 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Jane McKenzie, Christine van Winkelen and Sindy Grewal

Decisions are integral to daily business practice. Sound and agile decision making is argued to be a core strategic capability. Knowledge helps avoid the consequences of

Abstract

Purpose

Decisions are integral to daily business practice. Sound and agile decision making is argued to be a core strategic capability. Knowledge helps avoid the consequences of ill‐informed decisions. Facts and expertise provide content; know‐how about the pitfalls and requirements of thinking through problems in different contexts contributes to sound process. This paper seeks to offer a staged framework to guide organisational discussions about how knowledge management (KM) can contribute to better decision‐making capability.

Design/methodology/approach

Consistent with a maturity model approach, the study used an interactive multi‐method design to explore knowledge and decision making with experienced practitioners. Guided by the literature the authors collected input via three focus groups and eight interviews with KM practitioners plus 19 interviews with senior decision makers chosen for their good track record. From the combination of input five stages of capability building in five key areas of intellectual capital development were identified.

Findings

The output is a maturity model that can be used to assess organisational status in knowledge‐enabled decision making and plan for relevant KM interventions to improve organisational capability across a range of contexts.

Practical implications

A discussion around current status raises awareness of the pitfalls that can lead to poor or unsound decisions. This can help individuals reflect on how to improve their practice, and organisations to learn systematically from past experience, improve governance of the decision‐making process and progressively improve capability by planning deliberate developmental action.

Originality/value

The paper provides a rigorously developed tool for systematic evaluation and planning about a critical business capability.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1990

Peter Brophy

The term workstation is not easily defined, but experience from fields other than librarianship demonstrates the development of the concept and the convergence of its…

Abstract

The term workstation is not easily defined, but experience from fields other than librarianship demonstrates the development of the concept and the convergence of its different implementations. New workstations will be multifunctional, and will enable several tasks to be run concurrently. Library managers' use of workstations is surveyed, and the need for investment in development and applications identified.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 42 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Helge Clausen

A short presentation concerning the use of computer‐mediated‐communication (CMC) in information work is given together with the latest figures for use worldwide. Human…

Abstract

A short presentation concerning the use of computer‐mediated‐communication (CMC) in information work is given together with the latest figures for use worldwide. Human aspects of CMC are discussed briefly. A few traditional information professional applications of electronic mail are described. Special attention is paid to the Danish Science Park Network as an example of computer supported cooperative work (CSCW). Through the use of some examples of dedicated ‘person‐centred’ systems (ALANET, LA‐net, etc.), interesting new applications of E‐mail for the information professional are considered.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Karen L. Furness, E Margaret and Graham

A survey undertaken during August and September 1994 examined the use of IT in 170 libraries and information units in the corporate, government and medical sectors…

Abstract

A survey undertaken during August and September 1994 examined the use of IT in 170 libraries and information units in the corporate, government and medical sectors. Ninety‐five per cent of the organisations surveyed use computerisation for some aspect of their library or information service, either for library housekeeping operations or for access to databases in a variety of electronic formats. This paper gives the results of the survey, reporting the current state‐of‐the‐art as well as giving an indication of future computerisation plans in special libraries.

Details

Program, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

J.W.F. Collins

Inland waterways play a much greater role in inland freight carrying in the United Kingdom than is generally realised. The purpose of this article is to show the extent of…

Abstract

Inland waterways play a much greater role in inland freight carrying in the United Kingdom than is generally realised. The purpose of this article is to show the extent of the underestimation of water transport and to outline the potential for future development and the problems which will have to be overcome to realise that potential.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Syed Faheem Hasan Bukhari, Frances M. Woodside, Rumman Hassan, Ayesha Latif Shaikh, Saima Hussain and Waqas Mazhar

This study aims to explore whether religiosity influences consumer purchase behavior among Muslim consumers in Pakistan.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore whether religiosity influences consumer purchase behavior among Muslim consumers in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth, semi-structured interview protocol was developed and administered to a sample of 90 participants, both male and female, across eight metropolitan cities of Pakistan. Professionals, university students and housewives were part of the sample. NVivo Version 11 was used for data analysis to answer the research questions raised in this study. Moreover, the purposive sampling method has been used in this research.

Findings

The behavior of consumers was found to vary with the degree of involvement and the degree of religiosity. Study findings are divided into three themes. Firstly, a high level of religiosity makes Muslim consumers follow the Islamic principles of food consumption, by evaluating the product ingredients, spending moderately and verifying a halal logo at the time of purchase. Secondly, a major theme is the view that religiosity has no influence on food consumption; it is more about individuals’ needs and priorities. Finally, the consumers’ overall perception of quality, product value, purity and health consciousness over-powers the concept of religiosity.

Research limitations/implications

Because of its qualitative and exploratory nature, the generalizability of this paper is limited. In addition to that, this research is just focused on one Muslim country.

Practical implications

This study suggests that western food exporters may use religiosity and other factors as probable segmentation variables to effectively position their brands. Religious images and other factors may be highlighted in product packaging and communication campaigns by marketers to gain recognition and usage of western food and consumption among religious, Pakistani Muslim consumers. The output of this research may support prospective entrants into the food business; those interested in exploring the Asian consumer market. Findings from this study may also be helpful for those in the west interested in exploring Pakistan as an emerging consumer market.

Social implications

The presence of western imported food may improve the quality of life by having more opportunities and healthier options for the nation. Western food products can also bring cultural convergence whereby the underdeveloped nation feels upgraded and modern. Moreover, if the western food products are certified halal, the product has a fair chance of adoption and penetration in the society. Also, the food products coming from the western world induces mindfulness, people are more aware about innovative and useful ingredients that can satisfy their taste buds, improve their health, increase their life expectancy and contented approach toward life.

Originality/value

Thus far, limited research has analyzed religiosity of an overwhelmingly Muslim population and its impact on consumer behavior. This study is a preliminary effort to provide a basic understanding of the behavior of Pakistani Muslims, who have been insufficiently investigated by marketing and consumer researchers. The intriguing results are to remind marketers that there are several factors that govern religiosity and lead to a purchase decision.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

1 – 10 of 195