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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Ann Marie Fiore, Seung‐Eun Lee and Grace Kunz

Mass customization entails the mass production of individually customized goods and services. Co‐design is a mass customization option where a product's design is based on…

Abstract

Mass customization entails the mass production of individually customized goods and services. Co‐design is a mass customization option where a product's design is based on the customer's selections from a range of design feature offerings. A model comprised of relationships between individual differences, motivations for using co‐design, and willingness to use co‐design was proposed and statistically supported using 521 university subjects from different regions of the USA and the analysis of moment structures (AMOS) statistic. As hypothesized, optimum stimulation level (OSL) predicted two clothing interest factors: experimenting with appearance (EA) and enhancement of individuality (EI). As proposed, OSL and EA predicted the two motivations, trying co‐design as an exciting experience and using co‐design to create a unique product, whereas EI only predicted using co‐design to create a unique product. Both motives were mediating variables between individual differences and willingness to use co‐design, but using co‐design to create a unique product had a stronger effect. Theoretical and marketing implications were discussed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Hye‐Shin Kim, Mary Lynn Damhorst and Kyu‐Hye Lee

This study examines how consumer involvement with apparel influences perceptions of an apparel product (T‐shirt) presented in a print advertisement. Consumer involvement…

Abstract

This study examines how consumer involvement with apparel influences perceptions of an apparel product (T‐shirt) presented in a print advertisement. Consumer involvement with apparel was examined in relation to three advertisement response concepts: attitude toward the advertisement, product attribute beliefs, and product attitude. Also as part of the study, three dimensions of apparel involvement were tested (fashion, comfort, and individuality). Finally, an advertising processing model that integrates apparel involvement with the three advertisement response concepts was tested. A convenience sample of students attending a midwestern university in the USA participated in data collection. Respondents were presented with a full‐page advertisement for a fictitious brand of apparel and answered items on the questionnaire. Findings confirmed that dimensions of apparel involvement shaped consumer attitudes. A combination of apparel involvement dimensions (fashion, individuality, and comfort) influenced consumer beliefs about product attributes in the advertisement. In terms of gender differences, the comfort variable showed to be a stronger component of apparel involvement for men and women tended to be more involved in fashion. Findings also supported relationships among advertisement response variables previously tested by scholars. Product attribute beliefs and ad attitude were significant in product attitude formation.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

D.Z. Seker, A. Tanik, M. Gurel, A. Ekdal, A. Erturk, S. Kabdasli and A. Aydingakko

This paper presents part of the results of ongoing integrated and interdisciplinary studies conducted at a vulnerable coastal lagoon system with the aim of protecting it…

Abstract

This paper presents part of the results of ongoing integrated and interdisciplinary studies conducted at a vulnerable coastal lagoon system with the aim of protecting it from further anthropogenic pollution. The target area is in southwestern Turkey, consisting of a lake that joins the Mediterranean Sea via a lagoon channel system. Land resources in the watershed are identified, including all the elements of the physical environment that influence potential land‐use, and are illustrated by the application of geographical information systems through mapping and visualization of various thematic layers of land. This study will enlighten those working on lagoon watersheds aiming at conservation of natural resources since it states the results of the studies conducted so far through various disciplines, and presents how data are utilized by the groups in an integrated manner. Based on the available data, pre‐modelling studies on hydrodynamic modelling and on water quality modelling are also referred. Identification of a watershed depends on gathering satisfactory data, which will further be used to establish sustainable development and management plans, apart from utilizing the obtained data for watershed and hydrodynamic modelling approaches and to better understand such complex systems.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Hye‐Shin Kim

This study sets out to explore how consumers may be segmented based on their levels of apparel product involvement using Kapferer and Laurent's consumer involvement…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to explore how consumers may be segmented based on their levels of apparel product involvement using Kapferer and Laurent's consumer involvement profiles (CIP). It also seeks to examine whether consumers within each profile group could be differentiated by their personally‐held values.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were mailed to female consumers, ages 18 and over, randomly selected from a consumer database. Responses from 757 female consumers were used. The response rate based on delivered questionnaires was 30 percent. Laurent and Kapferer's CIP was used to measure consumer involvement and Kahle's list of values (LOV) was used to measure consumer values.

Findings

Five consumer involvement types were identified based on four dimensions of involvement: challenged moderate, knowledged enthusiast, indifferent moderate, challenged enthusiast, and cautious moderate. This study found that values could be used to further explain differences between the enthusiast and moderate consumer types. All nine value items showed significant relationships with dimensions perceived/sign and pleasure interest. Knowledge enthusiast and challenged enthusiast types perceived many values to be significantly more important then challenged moderate types.

Research limitations/implications

Current findings varied somewhat from prior study results using the CIP scale. Further examination of the CIP scale in terms of dimensionality, validity and reliability are suggested.

Originality/value

This research segments consumers based on their levels of product involvement and profiles each group by personally‐held values.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Kerry Daniel

Service uniforms have often been studied from the customers’ perspective, as they contribute to service expectations and evaluations. Proposes that the influence of…

Abstract

Service uniforms have often been studied from the customers’ perspective, as they contribute to service expectations and evaluations. Proposes that the influence of uniform should also be considered from the service provider’s perspective. Discusses the first stage in the development of a 17‐item scale to assess service providers’ perceptions of their uniform. Identifies four dimensions of these perceptions: service approach, the look, customer influence and company identification. The emergence of the dimensions entitled service attitude and the look draws attention to issues concerned with how uniform wearers feel about themselves, and highlights the importance of the aesthetic uniform needs of the wearer. Suggests that management should give due consideration to uniform requirements as perceived by the service provider, as this is likely to impact positively on service employees and thus service orientation.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2016

Melanie Kay Smith, Sonia Ferrari and László Puczkó

The main purpose of this chapter is to analyze the relationship between service innovation and experience creation in the context of spas, wellness and medical tourism…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this chapter is to analyze the relationship between service innovation and experience creation in the context of spas, wellness and medical tourism. The objectives include providing an overview of service innovation theory and models and applying them to the spa, wellness and medical tourism sectors.

Methodology/approach

Primary research was undertaken with the purpose of identifying the most important elements in the experiences of spa and wellness guests and tourists. An online questionnaire was collected from 17 different types of spa and wellness facilities from 56 countries including all kinds of spa, wellness hotels, and retreats. Information given was based on three major demand segments: local customers, domestic tourists, and international tourists. A case study is also given of Pärnu hospital in Estonia, where innovative practices are being implemented to enhance the patient experience.

Findings

Findings suggested that some aspects of innovation (e.g., design and technology) are not as important as expected, but evidence-based treatments, medical services, and natural and local resources are.

Research limitations/implications

The research gives important insights into customer preferences and current and future trends; however, the research only focused on operator rather than consumer perspectives. This would require further research.

Practical implications

The research findings provide useful information to operators who are trying to create innovative, unique, and competitive customer services.

Originality/value

Existing service innovation models are applied to new sectors (spa, wellness and medical tourism) and new insights are given into how these sectors can increase innovation and enhance customer experiences.

Details

The Handbook of Managing and Marketing Tourism Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-289-7

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2019

KyoungOk Kim, Maina Sakaguchi and Masayuki Takatera

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a suitable position for the bustline of the upper garment and its effect on appearance for various body types. It also provides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a suitable position for the bustline of the upper garment and its effect on appearance for various body types. It also provides an appropriate balance between the bustline and the waistline.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors manufactured five upper garments using a patternmaking method that allows for the distance between the side neck point and the bust point (BL) to be altered. The appearance of the garments on four dress forms with different values of BL was compared using Scheffe’s paired comparison (Nakaya’s variation) of seven scales. In total, 20 Japanese subjects in their 20s evaluated the garments. Six evaluation items – wrinkle amount, fit, attractiveness, beauty, youthfulness and slimness – were used. The vertical ratios of the garments on each dress form, a (projected distance between the horizontal line of the shoulder points and the bustline) and b (projected distance between the bustline and waistline), were measured using 3D scanned data. The relationship between the ratios and the results of the sensory test was investigated.

Findings

It was found that changing the values of the BL influenced the appearance of the upper garments. The upper garment for which the BL was adjusted according to dress form was determined to not be well-fitting, attractive and beautiful. The garment with an a:b ratio of close to 1 was evaluated as beautiful, attractive and better fitting than all others.

Originality/value

The results of this study will help designers and patternmakers create more beautiful, attractive and fitting upper garments.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Hyun‐Mee Joung and Nancy J. Miller

The purpose of this study is to examine: direct effects of appearance management and fashion involvement on social participation; direct effects of social participation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine: direct effects of appearance management and fashion involvement on social participation; direct effects of social participation, appearance management, and fashion involvement on self‐esteem; and indirect effects of appearance management and fashion involvement on self‐esteem through social participation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 389 females aged 55 and over completed a mail survey measuring appearance management, fashion involvement, social participation, and self‐esteem. Principal component factor analysis was conducted to reduce multi‐items measuring the variables. Path analysis was employed to test direct and indirect effects among the variables.

Findings

The results of path analysis showed that social participation and appearance management had direct effects on self‐esteem, whereas fashion involvement had no direct effect on self‐esteem. However, both appearance management and fashion involvement had positive indirect effects on self‐esteem via social participation.

Practical implications

To maintain self‐esteem in old age, individuals should be encouraged to participate in social activities and appearance management activities. The fashion and personal care industry should have an awareness of older female consumers' needs and develop and provide age‐related products and services.

Originality/value

This paper provides important contributions to gerontology, retailing, marketing, and consumer behavior‐related research. Although older adults (55+) are an important market segment, especially for the fashion and personal care industry, little research has included this group of consumers. This study showed that older adult females' self‐esteem was influenced by social participation, appearance management, and fashion involvement. The finding of this study helps marketers developing products targeting seniors.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Pedro Quelhas-Brito, Amélia Brandão, Mahesh Gadekar and Sofia Castelo‐Branco

The purpose of this paper is to identify the antecedents and consequences of social media fashion influencer's (SMFI) diffusion of fashion information. This study proposes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the antecedents and consequences of social media fashion influencer's (SMFI) diffusion of fashion information. This study proposes and examines following research questions: What motivates SMFI to share fashion information? In what way shared fashion information impact SMFI?

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses semi-structured interviews with SMFI to learn about their relationships with followers. It then conducts a survey of 510 SMFI in Portugal. The data are analyzed by structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that intrinsic motivation can develop a SMFIs' fashion leadership, while the SMFIs' perceived usability of fashion blogs does not. The authors also find a self-serving bias among SMFI.

Research limitations/implications

SMFIs' fashion leadership is associated with the intrinsic motivations of sharing and helping other consumers make fashion decisions, which indicates that marketers can improve their results through using opinion SMFI to assist fashion consumers in purchasing decisions. Further studies should explore the processes adopted by fashion consumers to evaluate SMFI.

Originality/value

This study helps to understand the antecedents and consequences of fashion diffusion by SMFIs. In particular, the research helps the marketers to understand how the bonds between SMFIs and followers are nurtured.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Archana Kumar, Youn‐Kyung Kim and Lou Pelton

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of individuals' self‐concept, product‐oriented variables (i.e. consumer's need for uniqueness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of individuals' self‐concept, product‐oriented variables (i.e. consumer's need for uniqueness (NFU), and clothing interest), and brand‐specific variables (i.e. perceived quality and emotional value) on purchase intention toward a US retail brand versus a local brand that are available in the Indian market.

Design/methodology/approach

Data obtained from 405 college students in India were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study found that Indian consumers' self‐concept and NFU had indirect effects on purchase intention of the US brand and the local brand. Both self‐concept and NFU positively influenced clothing interest. Clothing interest positively influenced perceived quality and emotional value for the US brand, but not for the local brand. Emotional value was found to be an important factor influencing purchase intention toward the US brand and the local brand as well. However, perceived quality did not affect Indian consumers' purchase intention of the US and local brand. Implications for both US and Indian retailers are provided.

Originality/value

As India is witnessing multitude of US retailers in its market, this paper aids in the better understanding of the Indian consumers and their perceptions toward US and local clothing brands.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of 222