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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

J.D. Pratten

Professional wrestling is a multi‐million pound industry. Loyal fans watch events and buy merchandising. However, even the participants admit that the results are…

1188

Abstract

Professional wrestling is a multi‐million pound industry. Loyal fans watch events and buy merchandising. However, even the participants admit that the results are pre‐arranged, with writers producing the stories and the characters for those involved. In other words, the whole phenomena is manufactured. The spectators are aware of this, and still continue to offer their support. This study looks at the ways in which the industry seeks to entertain these fans and offer them the product that will maintain their interest and their attention and ensure that they will continue to pay regularly so as to maintain the industry’s profitability.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Marian Foley and Ian Cummins

The purpose of this paper is to highlight concerns about recent CPS guidance on the prosecution of rape and sexual assault cases.

273

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight concerns about recent CPS guidance on the prosecution of rape and sexual assault cases.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper places the CPS guidance in the wider policy context of concerns about sexual violence on mental health wards.

Findings

The paper concludes that the reported CPS guidance appears to run counter to other policy directives particularly the recent report from the CQC.

Originality/value

The paper is a first response to these issues.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Marian Foley and Ian Cummins

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a scoping study that explored the extent of recorded sexual violence perpetrated on inpatients on mental health (MH) units.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a scoping study that explored the extent of recorded sexual violence perpetrated on inpatients on mental health (MH) units.

Design/methodology/approach

A Freedom of Information Act (FOI) request was sent to 45 police forces. The FOI asked for the number of recorded offences of rape and sexual assault by penetration for the five years 2010-2015. Following the responses from the police, a similar FOI request was sent to MH trusts.

Findings

There were significant variations in the way that both police forces and MH trusts approached the recording of this information.

Research limitations/implications

The research highlights variation and inadequacy of current recording practices in relation to sexual offences committed against inpatients on MH units.

Practical implications

There needs to be more consistent systems of recording of allegations of sexual assault and responses to them by agencies. In the trust recording of these incidents, it is recommended that a specific category of sexual violence is created. On a national level, the Office for National Statistics should produce a national data set that records the number of rapes that are committed in MH inpatient units.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the “gap” of information in relation to recorded rape and may indicate that complainants with a history of mental illness are less likely to have their allegation recorded as a crime.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2018

Meraiah Foley, Marian Baird, Rae Cooper and Sue Williamson

The purpose of this paper is to explore how entrepreneur-mothers experience independence in the transition to entrepreneurship, and whether they perceive independence as…

1115

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how entrepreneur-mothers experience independence in the transition to entrepreneurship, and whether they perceive independence as an agentic, opportunity-maximisation motive or a constrained, necessity-driven response.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a qualitative and interpretive approach, the authors analysed interviews with 60 entrepreneur-mothers to refine conceptual understanding of independence.

Findings

The authors find that entrepreneur-mothers experience independence not as an opportunity, but as a functional necessity in managing the temporal and perceived moral demands of motherhood. The authors assert that there is a fundamental difference between wanting independence to pursue a more autonomous lifestyle, and needing independence to attend to family obligations, a difference that is not adequately captured in the existing conceptualisation of independence. Consequently, the authors propose the classification of “family-driven entrepreneurship” to capture the social and institutional factors that may disproportionately push women with caregiving responsibilities towards self-employment.

Practical implications

This paper proposes that a new category of entrepreneurial motivation be recognised to better account for the social and institutional factors affecting women’s entrepreneurship, enabling policymakers to more accurately position and support entrepreneur-mothers.

Social implications

The authors challenge the existing framing of independence as an agentic opportunity-seeking motive, and seek to incorporate family dynamics into existing entrepreneurial models.

Originality/value

This paper delivers much-needed conceptual refinement of independence as a motivator to entrepreneurship by examining the experiences of entrepreneur-mothers, and proposes a new motivational classification, that of family-driven entrepreneurship to capture the elements of agency and constraint embedded in this transition.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Meraiah Foley and Sue Williamson

Anonymous recruitment seeks to limit managers’ reliance on stereotypes in employment decisions, thereby reducing discrimination. This paper aims to explore how managers…

2750

Abstract

Purpose

Anonymous recruitment seeks to limit managers’ reliance on stereotypes in employment decisions, thereby reducing discrimination. This paper aims to explore how managers interpret the information embedded in anonymised job applications and how they interpret the organisational priorities driving the adoption of anonymous recruitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews with 30 managers in two Australian public sector organisations were analysed.

Findings

The results showed that managers used implicit signals and cues to infer the gender identities of applicants in anonymised applications, reintroducing the possibility of bias. Managers perceived that anonymous recruitment sent positive external signals to prospective employees but were sceptical about its effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The results showed that removing applicants’ names and identifying information from applications may not be sufficient to reduce bias. In organisations where managers are sympathetic to equity and diversity issues, use of anonymous recruitment may provoke resentment if managers perceive organisational distrust or inconsistent objectives. Limitations regarding the size and nature of the sample are acknowledged.

Practical implications

Organisations seeking to reduce gender discrimination in recruitment may consider adopting standardised application procedures or training managers to understand how stereotypes affect evaluations. Organisations should also assess managerial support for, and understanding of, anonymous recruitment prior to implementation.

Originality/value

The findings add to existing knowledge regarding the effects of implicit gender signals in managers’ assessments and the effectiveness of anonymous recruitment in reducing gender bias. It also contributes to signalling theory by examining how managers interpret the signals conveyed in organisational policies.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2017

Scott Carter

This essay explores certain aspects of single product industry basic systems of the type Sraffa develops in Part I of Production of Commodities by Means of Commodities. It…

Abstract

This essay explores certain aspects of single product industry basic systems of the type Sraffa develops in Part I of Production of Commodities by Means of Commodities. It focusses on triangular trade as the simplest expression of the more general n-commodity case. Two elements of the framework are explored: (i) the relation of exchange between all commodities, conceived as the configuration of exchange which is applicable to the subsistence and surplus models, and (ii) the value/price expressions of labour time, applicable to the surplus model only, which posits the productivity of, remuneration to and extraction from living labour added to the system. This analysis complements and extends the Marxian reading of Sraffa’s notions of surplus and deficit industries first explored in Carter (2014b). The methodology of ‘given quantities’ in expositing the relations developed is adopted in this essay as it corresponds to the same method employed by Sraffa. This allows readers to easily move from the present essay to Sraffa’s book and importantly his archival notes which are now for all interested parties available as colour digital images on the Wren Library website.

Details

Including a Symposium on New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-539-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

M. Foley, M. Frew, D. McGillivray, A. McIntosh and G. McPherson

Sets out the issues peculiar to the Scottish workforce in sport and fitness, play and the outdoor sectors. Provides an exploration of the development of vocational…

1479

Abstract

Sets out the issues peculiar to the Scottish workforce in sport and fitness, play and the outdoor sectors. Provides an exploration of the development of vocational education in the form of sector skills training for these sectors in opposition to that formal education provided at further and higher education level. Draws on empirical research gathered as part of a report produced on each of the above sectors and written by the above authors. The report was supported by the Scottish Skills Fund in a grant to SPRITO, the national training organisation for these sectors. Although labour market intelligence suggests there are various skills shortages in these sectors and a lack of qualified personnel, the tension between the role of formal education and vocational work‐based learning qualifications is palpable. Solutions to apparent incommensurability of the two positions are offered, designed to ensure that these sectors achieve competitive advantage from a workforce that is both competent and reflective in their work practice.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Mian Zhang and Xiyue Ma

The overall goal of this chapter is twofold. First, the authors aim to identify indigenous phenomena that influence employee turnover and retention in the Chinese context…

Abstract

The overall goal of this chapter is twofold. First, the authors aim to identify indigenous phenomena that influence employee turnover and retention in the Chinese context. Second, the authors link these phenomena to the contextualization of job embeddedness theory. To achieve the goal, the authors begin by introducing three macro-level forces (i.e., political, economic, and cultural forces) in China that help scholars analyze contextual issues in turnover studies. The authors then provide findings in the literature research on employee retention studies published in Chinese academic journals. Next, the authors discuss six indigenous phenomena (i.e., hukou, community in China, migrant workers, state-owned companies, family benefit prioritization, and guanxi) under the three macro-level forces and offer exploratory propositions illustrating how these phenomena contribute to understanding employee retention in China. Finally, the authors offer suggestions on how contextualized turnover studies shall be conducted in China.

Details

Global Talent Retention: Understanding Employee Turnover Around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-293-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Eddie C.M. Hui

Mobility has wide‐range impacts on the financial management of property issues, such as consumption and investment. In the literature of residential mobility, household…

Abstract

Mobility has wide‐range impacts on the financial management of property issues, such as consumption and investment. In the literature of residential mobility, household life cycle is widely acknowledged as an important concept. An array of household demographic factors such as age has been repeatedly found to be significant in influencing mobility. Many previous researches offer few verifi able hypotheses or propositions and their results are conflicting. Some of them also suffer methodological inadequacies. This paper is an attempt to rectify this situation. There are two important contributions by the current research. One is a methodology that employs multivariate methods, which fills the gap of previous research. The second contribution is the large census dataset of Hong Kong which is rare in previous studies. The research is conducted under the framework of life cycle models with emphasis on economic and demographic variables of households. Demographic determinants are found to be more important in explaining population mobility among rental households while economic factors are more pertinent for owners. This may be explained by the different strategies adopted by renters and owners in satisfying their housing needs. Renters are envisaged to base their mobility decisions more on demographic factors. Owners, on the other hand, tend to view home buying as an investment as well and hence put more emphasis on economic factors. It is hoped that this research can shed more light on the topic of residential mobility by drawing on the experience of a large population residing in a small place, Hong Kong

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Jill Jakulski and Margo A. Mastropieri

The purpose of this chapter is to present a summary of the literature related to homework. First, information on the search procedures is provided, including the criteria…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to present a summary of the literature related to homework. First, information on the search procedures is provided, including the criteria for inclusion in this review. Second, a historical overview of homework in the United States is provided, including definitions and major changes in public opinion over time. The third section addresses the difficulties experienced by students with emotional disabilities in regard to homework. The fourth section reviews the homework policies presently in place at local school districts across the U.S. The fifth section discusses the effects of homework when basic classroom strategies, cooperative homework teams, self-management and goal setting, and assignment completion strategies are used. The sixth section describes the homework practices used, as reported by teachers and students. The seventh section describes the problems experienced by students with disabilities, from the perspective of teachers, parents, and students. A final section describes the kinds of problems associated with home-school communication.

Details

Research in Secondary Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-107-1

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