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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

F.T. Edum‐Fotwe, A.G.F. Gibb and M. Benford‐Miller

The concepts underlying innovation and standardisation presents an apparent divergence in what each strives to achieve. In the view of the authors, this has contributed in…

Abstract

The concepts underlying innovation and standardisation presents an apparent divergence in what each strives to achieve. In the view of the authors, this has contributed in no small measure to the low take‐up of standardisation within the construction sector as organisations strive to be innovative to improve on their performance and attain continuous improvement in their processes and operations as well as design solutions. The paper presents as a case, how one major public sector outfit is striving to achieve innovation within an agenda that involves a widespread adoption of standardisation. It presents the motivations for adopting an organisation‐wide agenda on innovation and standardisation, identifies the elements of apparent incongruity between the concepts, and outlines how the case organisation has resolved the divergences.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Patrick T.I. Lam, Franky W.H. Wong, Albert P.C. Chan, Wilson C.Y. Shea and Jo W.S. Lau

The purpose of this paper is to depict the developmental process of a buildability assessment model for use at the scheme design stage of building projects, which have a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to depict the developmental process of a buildability assessment model for use at the scheme design stage of building projects, which have a priority requirement for functional performance rather than aesthetic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

First, major decisions made at the scheme design stage of building projects were identified through pilot interviews and a questionnaire survey on designers. Second, these decisions were rated for their relative importance towards buildability through another questionnaire survey on contractors, analysed using the reliability interval method. Based on these results, a list of buildable and non‐buildable features and their impacts is compiled by interviewing major contractors. These findings were incorporated into a modified framework of buildability assessment for complete design, substituting information available at the scheme design stage. Validation was carried out using four sample projects and feedback from practitioners.

Findings

The results obtained from the Scheme Design Buildability Assessment Model have been demonstrated as reflective of actual buildability level. Buildable and non‐buildable features, as exemplified by typical building projects in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, have been identified.

Originality/value

This is the first model which provides a tool for use by the design team to evaluate the buildability of their designs at an early stage, so that necessary improvements can be made without affecting the development program.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Nadeeshani Wanigarathna, Fred Sherratt, Andrew Price and Simon Austin

The re-use of good design solutions is a key source of evidence and knowledge in the design of healthcare buildings. However, due to the unique nature of healthcare built…

Abstract

Purpose

The re-use of good design solutions is a key source of evidence and knowledge in the design of healthcare buildings. However, due to the unique nature of healthcare built environments, the critical application of this evidence is of paramount importance. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the features of such critical application and identify the aspects that need to be considered during the re-use of good designs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from three case studies of hospital designs in the UK were used to explore the processes behind the adaption and re-use of design solutions during the design of healthcare buildings. Data were thematically analysed to distinguish the aspects that should be carefully compared and contrasted during design re-use.

Findings

Existing designs of healthcare buildings should be captured and evaluated along with: patient demographics, care models of the hospital, other local departmental needs and facility operational aspects in order to ensure the effectiveness of re-use. In addition, properly introducing the design to the users is also a part of successful design re-use.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this research were integrated into a framework to support healthcare designers on the effective re-use of good designs. This data-driven framework could be validated further with design practitioners. Further, this research relied on memory recall of the interviewees and the accuracy and completeness of documentary records.

Practical implications

This research provides details of how healthcare built environment designs are embedded in project-unique circumstances. The results could therefore be used to develop meaningful and informative evaluation mechanisms for new and re-used healthcare building design features.

Originality/value

This research extends the understanding of the critical application of healthcare design evidence, by explaining how healthcare design solutions should be evaluated during the design process.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Hervé Leblanc, Craig Thomson, Iain Cameron and Pollaphat Nitithamyong

Improving process management within construction projects has been the source of academic and policy research for decades, and continues to be today. This paper seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving process management within construction projects has been the source of academic and policy research for decades, and continues to be today. This paper seeks to focuses on the relatively under investigated management of Housing Association (HA) planned works and aims to improve this often ill‐defined process by developing a Planned Work Process Model (PWPM) that aids the definition of the phases and activities.

Design/methodology/approach

First step in developing the process model was through semi‐structured interviews with 11 HA practitioners allowing for the identification of 20 planned works activities. Second step considered the responses of 7 HA practitioners to a set of questions about the 20 activities leading to the development of an initial Process Model (PM). Third step contextualises the PM within four case studies with HAs of different sizes from which the PWPM emerged. Finally, the PWPM was validated by a panel of HA practitioners.

Findings

The PWPM is a process model specific to the practices of HAs in the UK. It represents the first step for process management improvement for planned works by providing a structure to facilitate project planning and performance monitoring.

Research limitations/implications

A panel of HA practitioners recognised the uniqueness and value of the PWPM especially in the context of new staff induction and progress monitoring. Further refinement of the PWPM would be possible through a large survey to help improve its practical applicability and refining the activities description and vocabulary.

Originality/value

This research will be of interest to those responsible for planning and delivering HA planned works since it presents a tailored interpretation of the project process that currently does not exist.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Alex Opoku and Sarah A. Mills

As part of the UK Government’s strategy to address the current shortage of primary school places is the construction of standardised designed schools. The UK Government…

Abstract

Purpose

As part of the UK Government’s strategy to address the current shortage of primary school places is the construction of standardised designed schools. The UK Government has been facing an uphill battle to meet the demand for the ever-increasing number of school places it requires. This paper aims to explore the use of standardised school design in addressing the problem of primary school places in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Due to the exploratory nature of this investigation, a pragmatic research philosophy is utilised and mixed-method data collection techniques are used. Quantitative data collection is in the form of a survey involving 306 construction professionals and stakeholders; this has been consolidated using qualitative data collection in the form of nine purposefully selected semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The research highlighted the influence that people and their perceptions have on the successful implementation of standardisation. The results show that a high level of misunderstanding exists around the concept of standardisation and its definition. Standardised design has shown to have a remarkable influence in reducing the cost and time required for delivering the construction of new schools.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the exploratory nature of this research, the results obtained have not been wholly conclusive but have instead provided a contribution to the area of standardisation in construction.

Originality/value

The research has uncovered that, to truly promote and drive standardisation in the delivery of schools, a joint approach is required with designers, contractors, clients and manufacturers, working in partnership to develop successful solutions. The paper will, therefore, help the key stakeholders delivering standardised schools in UK to fully understand the concept and turn the challenges into opportunities.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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