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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Mark Taylor, Mike Baskett and Chris Wren

The purpose of this paper is to examine mechanisms for managing the transition from school/college/work to university for disabled students

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1776

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine mechanisms for managing the transition from school/college/work to university for disabled students

Design/methodology/approach

A research project using a case study methodology in a UK university department was conducted over a four year period

Findings

The paper finds that it is important that students with a disability who enter university identify themselves as early as possible so that appropriate adjustments can be made where required to teaching, assessment and pastoral care. It is also important that the transition to university is appropriately co‐ordinated both centrally by university wide disability support services and within the relevant university department. Ideally there should be anticipation of adjustments that may be required by the students with a disability.

Research limitations/implications

Although the case study reported in this paper focusses on just one university department, the number of students with a disability entering UK higher education is likely to increase and higher education institutions need to be aware of the adjustments that may potentially be required, as well as the timeliness of such adjustments.

Originality/value

In previous decades few students with a disability have attended university in the UK. However, growing numbers of such students are now attending university, but thus far little, if any research has been conducted regarding the adjustments that may need to be made for such students.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Ivan Hanuliak

As new computer communication systems, such as distributed computer networks or mobile data networks, grow in scale and complexity, the problem of being able to understand…

Abstract

As new computer communication systems, such as distributed computer networks or mobile data networks, grow in scale and complexity, the problem of being able to understand and to predict system behaviour becomes increasingly important. To their behaviour analysis we can use both analytical and simulation methods. Principally the application of analytical queuing theory results belongs to the preferred method in comparison to the simulation method. In this sense the article describes the development, realisation and verification of the new analytical model for the study of the basic parameters (end‐to‐end delay, performance etc.) of distributed data networks (computer networks, mobile data networks). The suggested model considers for every node of the data network one part for its own node's activities (communication functions) and another one for the modelling of each node channel for data transmission. When using a multiprocessor system, as the modern node communication processor, the model for its own node activities is the more realistic M/D/r system (Poisson arrival process/Deterministic service time distribution/r server system) and for the every node transmission channel the M/M/1 system (Exponential service time, Single server system). The new developed analytical model includes the influence of the communication functions to the whole delay in each node of a computer communication network. The achieved results of the developed model are compared with the results of the commonly used analytical and simulation models to estimate the magnitude of improvement. Likewise the developed analytical model was tested under various ranges of parameters, which influence the architecture of the distributed data networks and which are important for practical use.

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Kybernetes, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

M.J. Taylor, M. Baskett, S. Duffy and C. Wren

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of the types of adjustments appropriate to university teaching practices for students with emotional and behavioural…

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1288

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of the types of adjustments appropriate to university teaching practices for students with emotional and behavioural difficulties in the UK higher education (HE) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study in a UK university was undertaken over a two‐year period.

Findings

A variety of types of adjustments may be necessary for UK university students with emotional and behavioural difficulties including adjustments to pastoral care, teaching and assessment.

Research limitations/implications

The case study focussed on only three students with emotional and behavioural difficulties. However, given that the number of students entering UK universities with such difficulties is increasing, the results of this research can hopefully inform the teaching of future students.

Practical implications

This paper addresses what UK university teaching staff may need to do to support students with emotional and behavioural difficulties.

Originality/value

Although research has been conducted into the teaching of individuals with emotional and behavioural difficulties in schools, little if any research has been undertaken regarding teaching such students at university level.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2018

Batoul Khalifa, Ramzi Nasser and Haitham Alkhateeb

The purpose of this paper is to assess student perceptions of their engagement in tangible and intangible higher education services using the College Student Experiences…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess student perceptions of their engagement in tangible and intangible higher education services using the College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ).

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on a random sample of students without disabilities and all students with disabilities in a public university in Qatar. Group comparison analysis is conducted to find differences between the two groups by adapting the CSEQ to assess student perceptions of engagement with the services.

Findings

The findings showed that students with disabilities were less satisfied with intangible services in learning systems. Students with and without disabilities felt that the campus facilities were below average; students with disabilities rated university services lower than students without. All students felt that the learning systems were above average, with higher ratings among students without disability.

Social implications

Considerable work needs to be done in capacity and professional development with faculty to deal with learning and teaching methods with students with disabilities.

Originality/value

In general, this study compares students with disabilities with non-disabilities. Both groups confront barriers to access learning and to the assessment of their learning. They both were satisfied with services but with higher perceptions of engagement among those with non-disabilities. Higher education institutions must consider those services in unison to both groups treating both equally, recognizing that a discourse of differences may pit one group over another in infrastructure and the institutional services provided.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Michael Aherne and José Pereira

This paper situates a large‐scale learning and service development capacity‐building initiative for hospice palliative care services within the current Canadian policy…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper situates a large‐scale learning and service development capacity‐building initiative for hospice palliative care services within the current Canadian policy context for use by international readers.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2000 a national initiative using action research as its design was crafted to support continuing professional development and knowledge management in primary‐health care environments.

Findings

The Canadian health policy context is complex and requires innovative solutions to achieve desired changes in response to emerging population health demands for quality end‐of‐life care. Employment of educational and social science constructs, including complexity theory, communities of practice, transformative learning theory, and workplace learning methods, has proven helpful in supporting the creation of national capacity for hospice palliative care.

Research limitations/implications

There is a significant contribution for social scientists to make in aiding a better understanding of the complexity in health systems. At the same time, an aging population in industrial countries demands more active engagement of legal and bioethical scholars in a range of emerging policy and legislative questions about quality end‐of‐life care. Educational research is also required to understand better and reform curricula to prepare an emerging generation of health science practitioners for the demands of an aging population.

Practical implications

Changing health service delivery environments demand rethinking of the knowledge and skills leaders require to influence desired change. A broader understanding of where and how learning takes place is essential for enhancing the quality of patient care.

Originality/value

The Pallium Project represents a generative response to facilitating learning and building longer‐term system capacity. The journey of project development to date illustrates some important lessons that can be adopted from hospice palliative care to inform other primary‐health care initiatives, including, potentially, mental health, cardiology, diabetes, geriatrics, where productive change can result from productively linking specialists and primary‐care colleagues.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Fahri Karakas and Alperen Manisaligil

The purpose of this paper is to identify the new role that human resource developers play in the globally connected workplace. Towards that end, this paper explores the…

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3051

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the new role that human resource developers play in the globally connected workplace. Towards that end, this paper explores the changing landscape of self‐directed learning (SDL) within the digital ecosystem based on the concept of World 2.0.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews and builds on the literatures of self‐directed learning and Web 2.0 technologies to explore how self‐directed learning is being transformed in the creative digital era.

Findings

The paper outlines five transformations that change the landscape of workplace learning in the creative digital era: virtual collaboration, technological convergence, global connectivity, online communities, and digital creativity.

Practical implications

This paper gives extensive guidance on how HRD specialists and practitioners can transform their strategies to adapt to the training needs of employees in the creative digital era. The paper provides new ideas and vision for industrial trainers and human resource development practitioners on self‐directed learning.

Research limitations/implications

This article provides some future research areas and limitations.

Originality/value

This paper opens up new possibilities for self‐directed learning and discusses how self‐directed learning might be transformed in the light of technological and workplace changes. In particular, self‐directed learning might decrease the HRD/training costs significantly while providing employees with just‐in time training.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Michael Aherne

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271

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Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

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Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2002

Stephen Earl Lucas

This chapter views the leadership function of instructional supervision through three lenses: organizational improvement, teacher development, and student growth and…

Abstract

This chapter views the leadership function of instructional supervision through three lenses: organizational improvement, teacher development, and student growth and achievement. This chapter argues that quality supervision is a product of the principal developing and maintaining a trifocal view of (a) improving the school as an organization by (b) developing teacher capacity to (c) address the growth and achievement needs of students. Failure to adequately address any of these three areas leads to inadequate and unproductive supervisory behavior. Conversely, principals who develop this trifocal approach facilitate a synergistic system that enables the school, its faculty, and its students to grow.

Details

Challenges of Urban Education and Efficacy of School Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-426-4

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Cara Delay and Beth Sundstrom

This chapter examines symphysiotomy in twentieth-century Ireland as one example of a systematized obstetric violence that has characterized Ireland’s modern history…

Abstract

This chapter examines symphysiotomy in twentieth-century Ireland as one example of a systematized obstetric violence that has characterized Ireland’s modern history. Expanding scholarly interpretations of state- and Church-inflicted abuse of women in the twentieth century, this analysis establishes the medical profession as a central actor alongside the twentieth-century state-Church coalition that regulated women’s reproductive lives and engaged in systematic repression. This chapter recognizes that Ireland’s history of reproductive abuse and coercion did not just involve contraception or abortion but also labor and birth experiences. In addition, it offers a more complete and complex interpretation of obstetric violence by highlighting the experiences of married women with wanted pregnancies; almost all research to date focuses on the experiences of unmarried pregnant women or unwanted pregnancies. This examination of symphysiotomy and obstetric violence in Ireland illuminates the ways in which religious, national, and medical power has been mapped on women’s reproductive bodies, particularly in the decades after independence in 1922. It also makes essential links between Ireland’s past and present, demonstrating that a careful analysis of the history of obstetric violence and the religious underpinnings of it are essential in understanding Ireland today. With this research, we also place symphysiotomy within the context of the global reproductive justice movement, asking how a reproductive justice framework – one that links reproductive rights with social justice – can help us interpret obstetric violence and address the wounds of Ireland’s past.

Details

Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Sara Jebbor, Abdellatif El Afia and Raddouane Chiheb

This paper aims to propose an approach by human and material resources combination to reduce hospitals crowding. Hospitals crowding is becoming a serious problem. Many…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose an approach by human and material resources combination to reduce hospitals crowding. Hospitals crowding is becoming a serious problem. Many research works present several methods and approaches to deal with this problem. However, to the best of the authors’ knowledge – after a deep reading of literature – in all the proposed approaches, human and material resources are studied separately while they must be combined (to a given number of material resources an optimal number of human resources must be assigned and vice versa) to reflect reality and provide better results.

Design/methodology/approach

Hospital inpatient unit is chosen as framework. This unit crowding reduction is carried out by its capacity increasing. Indeed, inpatient unit modeling is performed to find the adequate combinations of human and material resources numbers insuring this unit stability and providing optimal service rates. At first, inpatient unit is modeled using queuing networks and considering only two resources (beds and nurses). Then, the obtained service rate formula is improved by including other resources and parameters using Baskett, Chandy, Muntz and Palecios (BCMP) queuing networks. This work is applied to “Princess Lalla Meryem” hospital inpatient unit.

Findings

Results are patients’ average number reduction by an average (in each block) of three patients, patients’ average waiting time reduction by an average of 9.98 h and non-admitted patients (to inpatient wards) access percentage of 39.26 per cent on average.

Originality/value

Previous works focus their studies on either human resources or material resources. Only a few works study both resources types, but separately. The context of those studies does not meet the real hospital context (where human resources are combined with material resources). Therefore, the provided results are not very reliable. In this paper, an approach by human and material resources combination is proposed to increase inpatient unit care capacity. Indeed, this approach consists of developing inpatient unit service rate formula in terms of human and material resources numbers.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

Keywords

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