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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Jim Townsend and M. Affan Badar

Reciprocating compressors offer an efficient method of compressing almost any gas composition in a wide range of pressures and have numerous applications. Condition…

Abstract

Purpose

Reciprocating compressors offer an efficient method of compressing almost any gas composition in a wide range of pressures and have numerous applications. Condition monitoring of critical rotating machinery is widely accepted by operators of centrifugal compressors. However, condition monitoring of reciprocating machinery has not received the same degree of acceptance. An earlier study (Townsend et al., 2016) was conducted on temperature monitoring. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of continuous pressure monitoring on electric-driven compressors.

Design/methodology/approach

This research analyzes the impact of continuous pressure monitoring on a fleet of 14 compressors transporting CO2 for enhanced oil recovery. The reliability and efficiency data on 14 reciprocating compressors over a three-year period were analyzed for failures detectable by the condition monitoring technology. The engineering economic analysis is presented to determine the impact this technology will have on the productivity of the compressors.

Findings

The study considers utilizing condition monitoring technology to analyze the pressure of the swept volume of the compressor cylinders. The results of the study indicate that continuous pressure monitoring technology has a strong impact on the productivity of the compressor fleet. The internal rate of return not only exceeds the operators hurdle rate, but the payback period is also dramatic. Pressure monitoring was found to be economically better than temperature monitoring.

Originality/value

The study reveals the economic benefits of implementing condition monitoring in the form of continuous pressure monitoring on reciprocating compressors.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Jeff Guinot, John W. Sinn, M. Affan Badar and Jeffrey M. Ulmer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possibility of including the cost consequence of failure in the a priori risk assessment methodology known as failure mode…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possibility of including the cost consequence of failure in the a priori risk assessment methodology known as failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA).

Design/methodology/approach

A model of the standard costs that are incurred when an electronic control module in an automotive application fails in service was developed. These costs were related to the Design FMEA ranking of the level of severity of the failure mode and the probability of its occurrence. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to establish the average costs expected for each level of severity at each level of occurrence. The results were aggregated using fuzzy utility sets into a nine-point ordinal scale of cost consequence. The criterion validity of this scale was assessed with warranty cost data derived from a case study.

Findings

It was found that the model slightly underestimated the warranty costs that accrued, but the fit could be improved with adjustments dictated by actual usage conditions.

Research limitations/implications

Cost data used in the simulations were derived from government and academic surveys, analyses, and estimates of the manufacturing cost structure; and nominal costs for various quality issues experienced by Tier 2 automotive electronics supplier. Specificity is lacking. The sample size and the type of the failure modes used to validate the model are constrained by the number and type of products which have had demonstrable performance concerns over the past three years, with cost data available to the authors. The power of the validation is limited. The validation is considered a screening assessment.

Practical implications

This work relates the characterization of risk with its potential cost and develops a scaling instrument to allow the incorporation of cost consequence into an FMEA.

Originality/value

A ranking scale was developed that related severity and occurrence rank scores to a cost consequence rank that keys to a cost of quality figure (given as percent of sales) that would accompany a realization of the failure mode.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Michael E. Odigie, M. Affan Badar, John W. Sinn, Farman Moayed and A. Mehran Shahhosseini

The purpose of this paper is to develop an optimal model of an integrated quality and safety management system (QSMS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an optimal model of an integrated quality and safety management system (QSMS).

Design/methodology/approach

Keywords related with these systems were identified from international standards and subsequently mined from a selection of peer reviewed articles that discuss and propose varying forms of integrated models for both systems. Cluster analysis was used to establish the degree to which integrated models, as described in the articles were quality dominant vs safety dominant. Word counts were utilized for establishing content and attributes for each category. An optimal integrated model was developed from the final cluster analysis and substantiated by a one-way analysis of variance. Experts from industry were consulted to validate and fine-tune the model.

Findings

It was determined that characteristics of an optimal integrated model include the keywords “risk,” “safety,” “incident,” “injury,” “hazards,” as well as “preventive action,” “corrective action,” “rework,” “repair,” and “scrap.” It also combines elements of quality function deployment as well as hazard and operability analysis meshed into a plan-do-check-act type work-flow.

Research limitations/implications

Given the vast array of clustering algorithms available, the clusters that resulted were dependent upon the algorithm deployed and may differ from clusters resulting for divergent algorithms.

Originality/value

The optimized model is a hybrid that consists of a quality management system as the superordinate strategic element with safety management system deployed as the supporting tactical element. The model was implemented as a case study, and resulted in 13 percent labor-hour saving.

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2020

Bruce H. Bader, M. Affan Badar, Suhansa Rodchua and Alister McLeod

This research brings together two streams of thought applied to decision-making: lean thinking and stakeholder theory. Both have been identified as ways to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

This research brings together two streams of thought applied to decision-making: lean thinking and stakeholder theory. Both have been identified as ways to improve organizational value. Previous studies disagree regarding whether they can work together. This study investigates if managers balance stakeholders and lean thinking in decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

This research investigates if both lean thinking and stakeholder salience share common literature by using data mining. It surveys organizations that perceive themselves as lean and have multiple diverse stakeholders to determine whether waste and salience are considered when making decisions. An ANOVA is done to see if organization type, management level, organization size, geographic location, or lean maturity has an effect on the priority of stakeholder salience or lean thinking's waste variants when making decisions.

Findings

Findings of this research are: 1) stakeholders salience criteria are considered more often than lean thinking's waste variants in decision-making by managers as a whole and in particular by middle-level managers and senior managers. However, lean thinking's waste variants are considered as often as stakeholder salience criteria by first-line managers. 2) The ranking of stakeholder salience in making decisions is not affected by organization type, respondent position, organization size, perceived lean experience, or geographic location. The organization type, organization size, lean experience, and location do not affect the ranking of lean thinking variants either. But the ranking of lean thinking's waste variants is significantly different for first-line, middle-level, and senior managers. Middle-level managers rank lean thinking higher than that of either first-line or senior-level. Because of this, middle managers have a more balanced approach in using lean thinking and stakeholder salience than other managers. 3) Stakeholder salience criteria have a significantly higher ranking than lean thinking variants in making decisions for all organization types: manufacturing and nonmanufacturing.

Originality/Value

This research demonstrates a significant disconnect exists between lean thinking and demands of stakeholders that impacts the value of an organization, and only middle-level managers bring balance and awareness of both streams of thought. An empirical instrument has been developed to balance the stakeholder salience criteria with the lean thinking variants.

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2015

Eli Kofi Aba, M. Affan Badar and Michael Allen Hayden

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of ISO 9001 certification on US firms’ financial operating performance for a period of five years including one-year…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of ISO 9001 certification on US firms’ financial operating performance for a period of five years including one-year prior to certification, year of certification, and three fiscal years after certification.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an examination of a sample of 397 firms that had received ISO 9001 certification from 1991 to 2002. Certified-firm, non-certified-firm, and matched-control-firm operating performances were examined over the same period based on the ratio of pre-tax operating income to total assets (EBITA/TA). Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to test for significant differences in operating performance among the certified, non-certified, and matched-control firms.

Findings

The paper concludes that there was significant improvement performance from prior year to year of certification. The certified firms performed better than the non-certified firms. The certified firms also performed better than the matched-control firms.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the research approach and the findings, the paper recommends the use of newer ISO data; any additional certifications; and further research into the lack of significant operating values by the certified firms in the post-certification years.

Practical implications

The paper shows that ISO 9001 certification is statistically related to operating performance. Certified firms have better operating performance. The positive significance in decile operating performance from prior year to certification year is an important finding for the implementation of ISO 9001.

Originality/value

The paper satisfies the need to study when ISO 9001 certification impacts firms’ financial operating performance.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Anwar K. Sheikh, Ahmed Z. Al‐Garni and M. Affan Badar

Aeroplanes are repairable systems consisting of several non‐repairable parts; tyres are one of these. Proper record of failure data is valuable in interpreting the failure…

Abstract

Aeroplanes are repairable systems consisting of several non‐repairable parts; tyres are one of these. Proper record of failure data is valuable in interpreting the failure pattern, for comparative evaluation of the quality of tyres of various manufacturers, and for prediction of the future needs in a specified planning horizon or for specified operational hours. Analyses failure data of several aeroplane tyres in an aviation set‐up, and interprets these in a reliability framework. Three parameters Weibull model is found to be quite appropriate for reliability characterization of tyres. These reliability models can be effectively integrated into a computerized material requirement planning system of the aviation facility to forecast the number of tyres needed for a given planning horizon.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Mark R. Chandler and M. Affan Badar

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of individual components' reliability on a system's reliability. The system refers to the Financial Management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of individual components' reliability on a system's reliability. The system refers to the Financial Management Information System (FMIS), the US Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) web‐based project approval and tracking software. Its components are 61 project information fields.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis would view each highway project‐funding request as an activity with cycle‐dependent performance for which success probability can be calculated as Reliability, R. The reliability analysis of the 61 FMIS fields results in a series system with Rsys the “estimated reliability” of finding “true” values in all 61 information fields during one highway‐related project funding authorization review.

Findings

Of an estimated 200 projects approved, there was previously estimated a 50 percent to 80 percent unreliability rate, while the study found an unreliability rate of approximately 80 percent.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the nature of federal government software, data can be very difficult to acquire in this working environment, but a simple calculation was relatively successful in confirming the “estimated reliability” of finding “true” values and showing how the reliability could dramatically decrease.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the applicability of reliability analysis to project approval software, showing the progression from estimated data to bounding the estimate using reliability theory.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Kiryanto Kiryanto, Indri Kartika and Zaenudin Zaenudin

Certification information published by a company will be responded by the market. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ISO 9001 certification…

Abstract

Purpose

Certification information published by a company will be responded by the market. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ISO 9001 certification on the stock market reaction as indicated by stock returns reaction of companies in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used event study method with the period of 13 days. It consists of 6 days before and after ISO 9001 certification announcement and 1 day at the time of the event. It analyzed by using pair sample t-test and one sample t-test. The stock return data is obtained from companies that are ISO 9001 certified and it tested for their stock reactions before and after the certification.

Findings

The results of empirical research showed that the average and companies cumulative abnormal returns in Indonesia react quickly and positively on the first day after ISO 9001 certification announcement. This study proved the differences between abnormal returns before and after the ISO 9001 certification announcement period.

Research limitations/implications

The company's success in implementing ISO 9001 will have an impact on investment in the capital market with a positive response from stock market players. The implication of this study is the further research can examine directly the impact of ISO 9001 implementation on investor behavior in the capital market.

Originality/value

Based on the development of the literature review, this is the first study which examined the impact of ISO 9001 certification announcement on investor reactions in the short term. Therefore, companies in Indonesia need to implement a quality management system for investors in Indonesia.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Jeff Guinot, Dustin Evans and M. Affan Badar

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of costs of quality on the present worth (PW) of a new product launch at a North American automobile manufacturer.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of costs of quality on the present worth (PW) of a new product launch at a North American automobile manufacturer.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the examination of various cash flows associated with a new product launch within an automobile manufacturer. Standard cash flows and a PW analysis were examined and compared to non-standard cash flows which take into consideration post-launch cost of quality (CoQ). A sensitivity analysis was used to determine if any CoQ factors affected the integrity of the product launch.

Findings

The paper concludes that there is an impact on the PW of a program when CoQ is considered as a cash flow element. CoQ should be considered in a product launch PW analysis preceding any commitment to invest.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that, given data on the costs that will accrue assuming standard quality concerns following product launch, and the occurrence of special cause issues, the business case can establish a better estimate of the costs a program will face under varying levels of post-launch quality. An understanding of the potential cost consequences of quality issues can shape the understanding of the risks in a planned project.

Practical implications

The paper shows that CoQ can have a significant impact on a PW analysis. CoQ concerns should be considered during pre-launch planning of a new product.

Originality/value

The paper satisfies the need to study when a manufacturer considers investment in the launch of a new product with CoQ concerns.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Tiedo Tinga, Flip Wubben, Wieger Tiddens, Hans Wortmann and Gerard Gaalman

For many decades, it has been recognized that maintenance activities should be adapted to the specific usage of a system. For that reason, many advanced policies have been…

Abstract

Purpose

For many decades, it has been recognized that maintenance activities should be adapted to the specific usage of a system. For that reason, many advanced policies have been developed, such as condition-based and load-based maintenance policies. However, these policies require advanced monitoring techniques and rather detailed understanding of the failure behavior, which requires the support of an OEM or expert, prohibiting application by an operator in many cases. The present work proposes a maintenance policy that relieves the high (technical) demands set by these existing policies and provides a more accurate specification of the required (dynamic) maintenance interval than traditional usage-based maintenance.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology followed starts with a review and critical assessment of existing maintenance policies, which are classified according to six different aspects. Based on the need for a technically less demanding policy that appears from this comparison, a new policy is developed. The consecutive steps required for this functional usage profiles based maintenance policy are then critically discussed: usage profile definition, monitoring, profile severity quantification and the possible extension to the fleet level. After the description of the proposed policy, it is demonstrated in three case studies on real systems.

Findings

A maintenance policy based on a simple usage registration procedure appears to be feasible, which enables a significantly more efficient maintenance process than the traditional usage-based policies. This is demonstrated by the policy proposed here.

Practical implications

The proposed maintenance policy based on functional usage profiles offers the operators of fleets of systems the opportunity to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of their maintenance process, without the need for a high investment in advanced monitoring systems and in experts interpreting the results.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this work is the explicit definition of a new maintenance policy, which combines the benefits of considering the effects of usage or environment severity with a limited investment in monitoring technology.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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