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Article

Jack T. Marchewka and Lynn Neeley

Strategic alliances between academic and corporate partners can provide exceptional benefits and reveal new opportunities for shared value. Benefits and opportunities…

Abstract

Strategic alliances between academic and corporate partners can provide exceptional benefits and reveal new opportunities for shared value. Benefits and opportunities include alternative sources of funding to support academic programs, more effective and efficient matching of students with prospective employers, applied research for faculty, innovative and mutual learning environments, and improved business practices. The focus of this paper will describe how three corporate‐alliance relationships with Northern Illinois University’s College of Business were initiated and developed. Other schools and companies looking to develop similar relationships may hopefully benefit from the College of Business’s experience. Moreover, corporate and academic alliances provide a potentially rich area of research.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article

Jessica L. Robinson, Karl Manrodt, Monique Lynn Murfield, Christopher A. Boone and Paige Rutner

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a dual pathway model whereby addressing the question, “What are the effects of supply chain orientation and organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a dual pathway model whereby addressing the question, “What are the effects of supply chain orientation and organizational identification on internal integration and supplier integration?”.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design was performed to collect data from supply chain professionals regarding their organization’s supply chain orientation (SCO), organizational identification (OI) and achieved states of both internal and supplier integration. Partial least squares-structural equation modeling was performed to test the dual mediating pathways.

Findings

The results show that internal integration partially mediates relationships between SCO and supplier integration and for OI and supplier integration. In comparing the mediating effects to test competing theories, the SCO path yields stronger complementary partial mediation. This supports the proposition that SCO and OI mutually exist within an organization and influence achieved integrative behaviors. Additionally, results suggest the behavioral spillover effect exists for an internally integrated organization that has also achieved supplier integration.

Originality/value

This research makes several contributions to extant literature, including finding that SCO contributes to levels of achieved integration. Also, this research theoretically integrates literature on the social dilemma associated with supplier integration and the behavioral spillover effect, suggesting that SCO allows for positive internal integrative behaviors to spillover to integrated suppliers. Finally, this research contributes to research on OI by finding achieved integration is an outcome, which refutes a dominate theory that explains OI facilitates negative behaviors toward external organizations.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article

Andrew Atherton

This paper seeks to understand the dynamics of new venture financing across 20 business start‐ups.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to understand the dynamics of new venture financing across 20 business start‐ups.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 cases were explored, via initial discussions with the founder(s), and follow‐up contact to confirm sources of financing acquired during new venture creation. This approach was adopted because of the challenges associated with acquiring full details of start‐up financing, and in particular informal forms of new venture financing.

Findings

Significant variation in, and scale of, new venture financing was identified. In multiple cases, funding patterns did not tally with established explanations of small business financing.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitation of the analysis is the focus on a small number of individual cases. Although this allowed for more detailed analysis, it does not make the findings applicable across the small business population as a whole. New ventures acquired very different forms of finance, and in different configurations or “bundles”, so creating a wide range of start‐up financing patterns and overall levels of capitalisation. This suggests that multiple factors influence founder decisions on start‐up funding acquisition. It also indicates the wide divergence between highly capitalised and under‐capitalised start‐ups.

Practical implications

Many of the new ventures were started with low levels of capitalisation, which as the literature suggests is a strong determinant of reduced prospects for survival. This suggests a possible “financing deficit”, rather than gap, for a proportion of business start‐ups.

Originality/value

The paper provides an alternative methodology for considering new venture financing, and as a result concludes that standard, rational theories of small business financing may not always hold for new ventures.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article

V.‐W. Mitchell

The high cost and importance of organisational professional services together with the often uncertain outcomes can evoke significant risk in their purchase. Using the…

Abstract

The high cost and importance of organisational professional services together with the often uncertain outcomes can evoke significant risk in their purchase. Using the appointment of planning consultants by a public organisation as an example, the article explores the potential of a new risk framework for measuring risk perceptions and developing risk‐based segmentation for organisational purchasers of professional services. The approach proved to be effective and identified three distinct risk segments which varied demographically and in their attitudes towards risk. It is suggested that risk‐based segmentation may be useful for purchasers and providers of other organisational professional services and other high‐risk organisational purchasing contexts.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

David Pickernell, Gary Packham, Paul Jones, Christopher Miller and Brychan Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether, and in what areas, graduate entrepreneurs are significantly different from non‐graduate entrepreneurs, both generally…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether, and in what areas, graduate entrepreneurs are significantly different from non‐graduate entrepreneurs, both generally and in terms of external resources (advice, finance and public procurement contracts).

Design/methodology/approach

The available literature was evaluated to identify issues affecting enterprise generally, and external resource access and use and educational attainment specifically. The data used were generated from the 2008 UK Federation of Small Businesses Survey, providing over 8,000 usable responses for this analysis. Quantitative analysis identified significant general characteristics of graduate entrepreneurs compared with non‐graduate entrepreneurs. Factor analysis was then used to identify the sets of advice, finance and public procurement customers of greatest interest, with independent samples t‐tests used to compare graduate and non‐graduate use thereof.

Findings

Graduate entrepreneur‐owned firms were statistically significantly more likely (than non‐graduate‐owned firms) to have younger owners, be younger and more export‐oriented businesses, in high knowledge services, to have intellectual property, make more use of web sites and be of high growth potential. In terms of external resources, graduate‐owned businesses were more likely to have received beneficial business advice from informal networks/trade associations, government business services, friends and family, customers and suppliers, and to have public procurement customers at the national/international level.

Originality/value

The study provides important empirical baseline data for future quantitative and qualitative studies focused on the impact of enterprise education specifically.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article

V.‐W. Mitchell

Despite the importance of professional services to organisations, relatively little is known about the way they are purchased. This study details the risks perceived and…

Abstract

Despite the importance of professional services to organisations, relatively little is known about the way they are purchased. This study details the risks perceived and risk‐reducing strategies employed by purchasers in local government and examines how these vary with buying‐phase and buy‐class. Risk varied little, but some of the 36 risk‐reducing strategies identified varied across the buying phases and were more useful in the modified‐rebuy situation. The results are discussed in the context of risk measurement and implications for purchasers and providers of professional services.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

Santosh Kumar Pandey and Amit Mookerjee

Emotions in business-to-business (B2B) interactions are relatively unexplored when compared with business-to customer (B2C) industry wherein sufficient evidence…

Abstract

Purpose

Emotions in business-to-business (B2B) interactions are relatively unexplored when compared with business-to customer (B2C) industry wherein sufficient evidence implicating the role of emotions in decision-making is available. This study aims to explore the role of emotions in B2B decision-making, and a customer experience model is suggested for the B2B industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research methodology using structured and semi-structured interviews along with a repertory grid technique was followed during the study. Purposive sampling was done to identify respondents who were involved in the vendor choice process either as a buyer or a seller in their respective organizations.

Findings

Exploratory research conducted during this study supports the presence of five dimensions of customer experience – sensory, emotional, relational, behavioural and intellectual – in a B2B context. The study further indicates that the experiential value for B2B decision-making is derived from functional, symbolic, emotional and cost values which are assessed by the buyer during their interaction with the product or the service ecosystem and has an impact on the purchase intentions of an industrial buyer.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the role of specific customer experience dimensions in a B2B environment and proposes the role and mechanism of emotional factors affecting the decision-making process in B2B exchange.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article

WE offer our readers good wishes for 1939. We hope that every kind of library may be allowed in peace to pursue its development for the spreading of good reading, to the…

Abstract

WE offer our readers good wishes for 1939. We hope that every kind of library may be allowed in peace to pursue its development for the spreading of good reading, to the end that enlightenment and with it wisdom may prevail amongst our millions of readers. We hope too that it will be another year of progress in service, in good and deftly‐employed technique, in the development of the will to make libraries interesting, attractive, useful and indeed inevitable and essential to all men. For librarians we hope it may be a further stage in the promotion of their profession, of growth of their own faith in it, and of increase in the willingness of those who employ librarians in municipalities, counties, colleges and other places to recognize training and service with better pay, prospects and status. We know that appreciation will not give greater willingness to serve; we do know it will give greater happiness.

Details

New Library World, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Nigel F. Piercy and David W. Cravens

Constructs a new management agenda to evaluate the effectivenessand appropriateness of the marketing organization for the future,reflecting certain key changes in the…

Abstract

Constructs a new management agenda to evaluate the effectiveness and appropriateness of the marketing organization for the future, reflecting certain key changes in the current marketing environment. Argues that these critical factors impacting on the marketing organization include accelerating both external environmental changes and internal organization developments. Raises many important questions relating to the survival and the future forms of the marketing organization and the implementation of the marketing process. Finds that a prime manifestation of these changes is the development of various types of network organizational forms to implement strategic alliances and inter‐organizational collaborations and partnerships. Proposes a structured approach to mapping the implications for the organization of such changes and the development of an organizational strategy that defines an appropriate role and form for the marketing organization and marketing processes in the corporation of the future.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Nukhet Harmancioglu, Cornelia Droge and Roger J. Calantone

This study aims to scrutinize the meaning and domain of “innovation” by providing an extensive theory‐driven review of the new product literature in marketing, management…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to scrutinize the meaning and domain of “innovation” by providing an extensive theory‐driven review of the new product literature in marketing, management and engineering. The overall objective is to classify the recent literature on innovation and to illustrate theoretically derived discourses in the study of innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper organizes this literature by providing typologies of discourses, which define innovation. Based on our review of 238 articles from a comprehensive set of journals publishing innovation research, we propose a theoretical divide in the innovation literature.

Findings

Theoretical underpinnings, namely adoption/diffusion theory versus the resource‐based/contingency theory view, form one dimension of the typology. Jointly considered with the other two dimensions – level of analysis and customer vs firm perspective – a framework is formed of the different discourses and conceptualisations in the innovation literature.

Originality/value

Past researchers have always proposed a definition of innovation that was embedded in a typology of innovation types; in contrast, the paper allows the theoretical discourses to unveil meanings of innovation and associated constructs (and hence it starts with theory specification, not construct definition). It argues for starting with theory as the basic division and proposes a theory driven typology. Through its theoretical genesis, the paper wishes to create a shared understanding among academics and practitioners of what constitutes innovation and constructs within the related theoretical net.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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