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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Lynn C. Hattendorf Westney

The use of technology in teaching and scholarly publishing has become a vital part of the tripartite component (research, teaching, and service) of the promotion and…

Abstract

The use of technology in teaching and scholarly publishing has become a vital part of the tripartite component (research, teaching, and service) of the promotion and tenure process. Information technology (IT) is new territory in this process. The evaluation of the use of IT as an integral part of mainstream instruction is gathering momentum and generating dialogue within the professional literature of most disciplines. This article addresses the issues now facing faculty who are coming up for promotion and/or tenure and the issues with which their evaluators must grapple in reviewing their promotion and tenure papers.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Lynn C. Westney

This paper aims to examine the lack of attention to the preservation of intrinsic value in original artifacts by archivists and librarians with implications for the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the lack of attention to the preservation of intrinsic value in original artifacts by archivists and librarians with implications for the preservation of the permanent historical record.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a selective review of the recent literature about intrinsic value, the current situation is evaluated.

Findings

The paper finds that, in order to ensure the preservation of intrinsic value in both paper and digital documents, archivists and librarians must act immediately before substantial portions of the historical record suffer further permanent and irretrievable loss.

Originality/value

The issues involved in determining the presence of intrinsic value are examined. Recommendations are given for preserving the permanent historical record.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Yassine Talaoui and Marko Kohtamäki

The business intelligence (BI) research witnessed a proliferation of contributions during the past three decades, yet the knowledge about the interdependencies between the…

Abstract

Purpose

The business intelligence (BI) research witnessed a proliferation of contributions during the past three decades, yet the knowledge about the interdependencies between the BI process and organizational context is scant. This has resulted in a proliferation of fragmented literature duplicating identical endeavors. Although such pluralism expands the understanding of the idiosyncrasies of BI conceptualizations, attributes and characteristics, it cannot cumulate existing contributions to better advance the BI body of knowledge. In response, this study aims to provide an integrative framework that integrates the interrelationships across the BI process and its organizational context and outlines the covered research areas and the underexplored ones.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews 120 articles spanning the course of 35 years of research on BI process, antecedents and outcomes published in top tier ABS ranked journals.

Findings

Building on a process framework, this review identifies major patterns and contradictions across eight dimensions, namely, environmental antecedents; organizational antecedents; managerial and individual antecedents; BI process; strategic outcomes; firm performance outcomes; decision-making; and organizational intelligence. Finally, the review pinpoints to gaps in linkages across the BI process, its antecedents and outcomes for future researchers to build upon.

Practical implications

This review carries some implications for practitioners and particularly the role they ought to play should they seek actionable intelligence as an outcome of the BI process. Across the studies this review examined, managerial reluctance to open their intelligence practices to close examination was omnipresent. Although their apathy is understandable, due to their frustration regarding the lack of measurability of intelligence constructs, managers manifestly share a significant amount of responsibility in turning out explorative and descriptive studies partly due to their defensive managerial participation. Interestingly, managers would rather keep an ineffective BI unit confidential than open it for assessment in fear of competition or bad publicity. Therefore, this review highlights the value open participation of managers in longitudinal studies could bring to the BI research and by extent the new open intelligence culture across their organizations where knowledge is overt, intelligence is participative, not selective and where double loop learning alongside scholars is continuous. Their commitment to open participation and longitudinal studies will help generate new research that better integrates the BI process within its context and fosters new measures for intelligence performance.

Originality/value

This study provides an integrative framework that integrates the interrelationships across the BI process and its organizational context and outlines the covered research areas and the underexplored ones. By so doing, the developed framework sets the ground for scholars to further develop insights within each dimension and across their interrelationships.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Taran Patel

The purpose of this paper is to address four questions: what are the drawbacks of an over reliance on the objectivist tradition in culture in international business (CIB…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address four questions: what are the drawbacks of an over reliance on the objectivist tradition in culture in international business (CIB) scholarship? Is a shift from mono-paradigmatic to multi-paradigmatic cultural research justified? What explains scholars’ hesitation in engaging in multi-paradigmatic studies? What arguments can we offer to convince them otherwise?

Design/methodology/approach

Informed by the critical perspective, this paper encourages a shift from mono-paradigmatic to multi-paradigmatic cultural studies. Guided by an emancipatory interest, and treating the field of culture studies as a complex system, this paper offers an integrative complexity (IC) based argument in favor of multi-paradigmatic studies. It argues that multi-paradigmatic studies allow scholars to employ higher IC than mono-paradigmatic studies, resulting in more innovative research outputs.

Findings

While mono-paradigmatic studies can achieve either predictability of output or in-depth understanding of cultural phenomena, multi-paradigmatic studies are capable of attaining both. The authors illustrate this through the example of a recent multi-paradigmatic study.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not offer insights for operationalizing multi-paradigmatic research, nor does it address factors other than IC that may impede scholars from engaging in such studies.

Practical implications

Shifting from mono-paradigmatic to multi-paradigmatic studies will enable scholars to address questions hitherto left unaddressed in CIB literature, facilitate a better understanding of new organizational forms, and redress the power disequilibrium between different paradigmatic schools. Implications are also offered for the training of cultural researchers in business schools.

Originality/value

This paper is the first of its kind to relate IC to merits of multi-paradigmatic cultural studies.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Yassine Talaoui and Marko Kohtamäki

The business intelligence (BI) literature is in a flux, yet the knowledge about its varying theoretical roots remains elusive. This state of affairs draws from two…

Abstract

Purpose

The business intelligence (BI) literature is in a flux, yet the knowledge about its varying theoretical roots remains elusive. This state of affairs draws from two different scientific communities (informatics and business) that have generated multiple research streams, which duplicate research, neglect each other’s contributions and overlook important research gaps. In response, the authors structure the BI scientific landscape and map its evolution to offer scholars a clear view of where research on BI stands and the way forward. For this endeavor, the authors systematically review articles published in top-tier ABS journals and identify 120 articles covering 35 years of scientific research on BI. The authors then run a co-citation analysis of selected articles and their reference lists. This yields the structuring of BI scholarly community around six research clusters: environmental scanning (ES), competitive intelligence (CI), market intelligence (MI), decision support (DS), analytical technologies (AT) and analytical capabilities (AC). The co-citation network exposed overlapping and divergent theoretical roots across the six clusters and permitted mapping the evolution of BI research following two pendulum swings. This study aims to contribute by structuring the theoretical landscape of BI research, deciphering the theoretical roots of BI literature, mapping the evolution of BI scholarly community and suggesting an agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper follows a systematic methodology to isolate peer-reviewed papers on BI published in top-tier ABS journals.

Findings

The authors present the structuring of BI scholarly community around six research clusters: ES, CI, MI, DS, AT and AC. The authors also expose overlapping and divergent theoretical roots across the six clusters and map the evolution of BI following two pendulum swings. In light of the structure and evolution of the BI research, the authors offer a future research agenda for BI research.

Originality/value

This study contributes by elucidating the theoretical underpinnings of the BI literature and shedding light upon the evolution, the contributions, and the research gaps for each of the six clusters composing the BI body of knowledge.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Masao Nakamura and W. Mark Fruin

The Chinese economy, among other developing economies in Asia, has experienced extraordinary growth in the last decade. Yet, for China and other newly emerging economies…

Abstract

Purpose

The Chinese economy, among other developing economies in Asia, has experienced extraordinary growth in the last decade. Yet, for China and other newly emerging economies in Asia to grow in a sustainable manner, good corporate governance and management mechanisms must be in place. The authors aim to explore this issue in this paper. The authors also aim to particularly point out that Japan's experience both before after the Second World War will be relevant as a model for China's public and business development policy decision‐making.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply well‐established theories of economic development and organizational structures of business organizations to Japan's experience before and after the Second World War and then to contemporary China's experience. The analysis of Japan uses the substantial research findings on the development of that country available in the business history literature.

Findings

The paper's analysis shows multiple ways in which China and other emerging East Asian economies can take advantage of Japan's experience (which is called the Japan model here) for their own development policies and achieve sustainable growth in the long run. For example, it is expected that Japan's experiences may be relevant in areas such as: firm formation and the utility of business groups of various types; development of industrial relations and employment practices; interactions between business and government in the promotion of economic development; and how these factors relate to technology advances on a worldwide basis.

Originality/value

The findings reported in this paper also contribute marginally to the literature by considering the recent experience of Chinese private and state‐owned corporations, including international joint ventures, in the context of Japan's experience in its economic and business development history.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Comparative Studies of Technological Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-118-7

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Morten Wied, Josef Oehmen, Torgeir Welo and Ergo Pikas

Most complex engineering projects encounter unexpected events through their life cycle. These are traditionally attributed to inaccurate foresight and poor planning…

Abstract

Purpose

Most complex engineering projects encounter unexpected events through their life cycle. These are traditionally attributed to inaccurate foresight and poor planning. Outlining a nonanticipatory alternate, the authors seek to explain the ability to rebound from unexpected events, without foresight, using resilient systems theory. This paper seeks to outline the theoretical underpinnings of project resilience and to identify criteria for planning and selecting projects for greater resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

Investigating project resilience, this paper studies the relationship between unexpected events and project performance in 21 projects. The authors perform a systematic review of project ex post evaluations 3–12 years after project completion.

Findings

First, the authors find that all projects encountered unexpected events, even when discounting planning error. Second, the authors show that, as a consequence, projects underperformed, not necessarily relative to formal criteria, but in terms of subjective opportunity cost, that is, relative to competing alternates – known or imagined – foregone by their implementation. Finally, the authors identify four types of resilient projects – superior, equivalent, compensatory and convertible projects – as opportunities for building project resilience.

Practical implications

The properties of resilient projects provide opportunities for building resilience in complex projects.

Originality/value

Departing from traditional efforts to “de risk” plans and “de-bias” planners, this paper focuses on the properties of projects themselves, as an alternate to improved foresight and up-front planning.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Susan Frey‐Ridgway

International business endeavors require people to communicate across cultural and national boundaries. For the past 20 years scholars have explored the ways in which…

Abstract

International business endeavors require people to communicate across cultural and national boundaries. For the past 20 years scholars have explored the ways in which culture influences work, habits and values, communication styles, and business practices. Along with the trend toward a global economy, there is today a greater recognition among specialists that cultural differences affect all facets of international business. Because of this, librarians serving practitioners and scholars of international business are challenged to provide information aimed at making the business professional more productive in culturally diverse environments. Provides a brief overview of the topic of cultural diversity in business literature. Follows this with an extensive bibliography of current English‐language works offering theoretical and applied approaches to this theme. Includes an annotated list of organizations involved in the cultural aspects of international business.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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