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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2010

Lyndsey Smith and Di Bailey

While the involvement of service users in mental health research has increased, a review of the literature suggests that this apparent increase in involvement does not necessarily…

Abstract

While the involvement of service users in mental health research has increased, a review of the literature suggests that this apparent increase in involvement does not necessarily coincide with service users having a ‘louder voice’ or greater control over service delivery.The purpose of this investigative study was to explore the barriers and support systems for service user‐led research within a local NHS trust. The study focused on an original research project that set out to be service user‐led by designing and piloting an evaluation tool to measure satisfaction with care planning across the trust. The paper describes a qualitative methodology that captured stakeholder's experiences of why the original project did not reach its intended conclusion. Interviews were conducted with a range of professionals and service users, alongside participant observations of steering group meetings. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach that led to the identification of key lessons for those intending to involve service users in research in the future. The findings suggest that there are many support systems that can assist service user‐led research, but there are still too many barriers to implementing it effectively; in particular, processes surrounding ethical approval and the stigma attributed to such research by some professional staff.The lessons learned are presented to assist in the education and training of mental health service user researchers or professionals who are conducting research collaboratively with service user colleagues.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Kelly Lockwood

Imprisonment has the potential to significantly impact mothering (Lockwood, 2017). For some women, imprisonment may present the opportunity to repair and rebuild fractured…

Abstract

Imprisonment has the potential to significantly impact mothering (Lockwood, 2017). For some women, imprisonment may present the opportunity to repair and rebuild fractured relationships with their children; however, for many, being separated from their children is constructed as the most difficult aspect of imprisonment (Crewe, Hulley, & Wright, 2017), with the potential to severely alter, disrupt or even terminate mothering (Lockwood, 2017; 2018). Available research highlights the importance of mothering in relation to women's adjustment to and experiences of imprisonment and upon their rehabilitation, resettlement and potential reunification (Baldwin, 2017; Lockwood, 2017, Lockwood, 2018). However, consistent with prison policy and practice, available research tends to rely on narrow definitions that often construct motherhood in relation to younger children, under the age of 18 (Caddle & Crisp, 1997). Consequently, the stories, experiences and needs of mothers in prison with older adult children often remain unheard.

Focussing on the individual stories of mothers in prison and those who have recently been released from prison, within this chapter, I consider the way in which women story motherhood in relation to older adult children. Presenting three interrelated narratives, ‘Mothering from a distance: stories of missing out on children's transitions to adulthood’; ‘“Motherwork: stories of participating in mothering adult children’ and ‘“Role reversal: stories of receiving support from adult children’, I consider the specific challenges and opportunities for mothers in prison with older adult children.

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2016

Stephanie M. Merritt and Lyndsey Havill

Many mentoring relationships incorporate electronic communication. This study aims to examine the effects of communication format and interaction frequency on career and social…

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Abstract

Purpose

Many mentoring relationships incorporate electronic communication. This study aims to examine the effects of communication format and interaction frequency on career and social support felt by the protégé.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys followed 39 high-potential protégés over seven months in a mentoring program at a large US manufacturing organization.

Findings

All pairs but one chose to communicate electronically at least 50 per cent of the time. Less mentoring support was perceived when average media richness was lower (e.g. when pairs communicated more by e-mail); however, this effect was reduced when communication was more frequent.

Practicalimplications

Mentors and protégés should be trained to understand that average media richness is associated with perceived support and that they should avoid using exclusively low-richness formats (e.g. e-mail). When they do need to use more low-richness formats, they should communicate more frequently. Companies should provide technological support and motivational incentives for mentoring pairs to incorporate high-richness interactions (e.g. face to face) in their mentoring relationships more often.

Originality/value

This study is the first to our knowledge to examine mixed-media formats in high-potential employee mentoring pairs. In contrast to past work which has randomly assigned participants to communicate only via one format, these participants were allowed to choose their interaction format for each interaction, which is more realistic. The findings have practical value for mentors and protégés in terms of balancing format and interaction frequency.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Lyndsey Bengtsson

The purpose of this paper is to report on an analysis of direct age discrimination cases by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and the UK courts and employment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on an analysis of direct age discrimination cases by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and the UK courts and employment tribunals over an 11-year period. The paper focusses upon age stereotyping towards older workers and analyses whether it is endorsed at the European level and/or national level.

Design/methodology/approach

This research has analysed a sample of 100 employment tribunal judgments concerning direct age discrimination together with 28 CJEU decisions on direct age discrimination.

Findings

This paper highlights that there are a number of cases in which age stereotyping has been endorsed at the CJEU level. By contrast, the UK courts and employment tribunals have adopted a more robust approach.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is that it only considers case law from the European Court and the influence on the UK case law, without analysing the eventual decisions of the other EU member states.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the debate with regard to the approach of the CJEU and the UK courts and employment tribunals in tackling age stereotyping and is the first to examine the influence the CJEU decisions has had on the UK jurisprudence over the period studied.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 62 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2012

Richard A. Bernardi, Meredith B. Larkin, Lyndsey A. LaBontee, Rebecca A. Lapierre and Nathalie C. Morse

This study surveyed 309 business students (180 men and 129 women) enrolled in introductory accounting and business law classes on various aspects of honesty in academics. The…

Abstract

This study surveyed 309 business students (180 men and 129 women) enrolled in introductory accounting and business law classes on various aspects of honesty in academics. The study was motivated by the need to examine the underlying issues associated with students’ perceptions of cheating and whistle-blowing. An increased understanding of these perceptions would be insightful to professors as well as administrators. The study examines students’ reasons on whether they should whistle-blow and whether their reasons associate with their intentions to whistle-blow if they observe cheating. When examining a student's intent to whistle-blow, we considered the student's prior cheating behavior, gender, social desirability response bias, intentions to cheat in the future, reasons not to whistle-blow, and prior whistle-blowing. Our data extends prior research by considering the reasons students choose not to whistle-blow. Our research indicates that the number of reasons not to whistle-blow and having observed other students cheating reduced the likelihood of a student whistle-blowing, after controlling for social desirability response bias. The research indicates that to prevent unethical behavior in the future, institutions need to enforce consequences for those who cheat because unethical behavior at the academic level associates with unethical behavior in the corporate setting.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-761-1

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2012

Abstract

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-761-1

Book part
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Elizabeth Borland and Diane C. Bates

Although there are more primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs) than research-oriented institutions (ROIs) in the United States and more professors work at PUIs than ROIs…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there are more primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs) than research-oriented institutions (ROIs) in the United States and more professors work at PUIs than ROIs, most research on gender inequality among faculty has focused on ROIs. Do patterns of women’s numeric scarcity, gender-hostile work climates, and difficulties with work-life balance found at ROIs hold true for PUIs? This chapter examines one PUI to address this question.

Methods

We analyze data from four sources: an archival database of all professors at the institution, interviews with full and associate professors, and two surveys.

Findings

Similar to ROIs, our study found women were less likely to achieve higher ranks, and take longer than men to do so. However, we find greater numbers of women and few gender differences in perception of climate, so numeric scarcity and gender-hostile climate cannot explain persistent lags in women’s advancement. Instead, we find women struggle with work-life balance more than men, especially in science disciplines. Thus, gender parity in advancement has yet to fully emerge, despite more women in the faculty and a more equitable climate than at ROIs.

Research implications

Differences between faculty cohorts are intensified at the PUI because of changes to the institution’s mission, but our research demonstrates that not all gendered patterns found at ROIs apply to PUIs.

Practical and social implications

PUIs that increasingly emphasize scholarly output should enact family-friendly policies to support all professors, including on-campus or subsidized childcare, flexible scheduling, family leave, and dual-career hiring policies.

Originality/value

This chapter demonstrates that there are important differences between ROIs and PUIs that must be taken into account if we are to understand and remedy gender inequality in academia.

Details

Gender Transformation in the Academy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-070-4

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Sarah Pedersen

Abstract

Details

The Politicization of Mumsnet
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-468-2

Abstract

Details

The Olympic Games: A Critical Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-776-3

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2022

Gary Lamph, Alison Elliott, Kathryn Gardner, Karen Wright, Emma Jones, Michael Haslam, Nicola Graham-Kevan, Raeesa Jassat, Fiona Jones and Mick McKeown

Workforce development is crucial to the offender personality disorder (OPD) service to provide contemporary, evidenced care and treatment. This study aims to provide an overview…

Abstract

Purpose

Workforce development is crucial to the offender personality disorder (OPD) service to provide contemporary, evidenced care and treatment. This study aims to provide an overview and the research evaluation results of a regional higher education programme delivered to a range of criminal justice workers used on the OPD pathway.

Design/methodology/approach

Three modules were developed and delivered; these are (1) enhancing understanding (20 students), (2) formulation and therapeutic intervention (20 students) and (3) relationships, teams and environments (17 students). A mixed-methods study evaluated participant confidence and compassion. Pre, post and six-month follow-up questionnaires were completed. Additionally, a series of focus groups were conducted to gain in-depth qualitative feedback with a cross-section of students across the modules (N = 7). Quantitative data was collected and analysed separately due to the three modules all having different content. Qualitative data was analysed, and a synthesis of qualitative findings was reported from data taken across the three modules.

Findings

A total of 52 students participated, drawn from three modules: Module 1 (N = 19); Module 2 (N = 18); Module 3 (N = 15). Confidence in working with people with a personality disorder or associated difficulties improved significantly following completion of any of the modules, whereas compassion did not. Results have been synthesised and have assisted in the future shaping of modules to meet the learning needs of students.

Research limitations/implications

Further evaluation of the effectiveness of educational programmes requires attention, as does the longer-term durability of effect. Further research is required to explore the post-training impact upon practice, and further exploration is required and larger sample sizes to draw definitive conclusions related to compassion.

Practical implications

This unique model of co-production that draws upon the expertise of people with lived experience, occupational frontline and academics is achievable and well received by students and can be reproduced elsewhere.

Social implications

The positive uptake and results of this study indicate a need for expansion of accessible OPD workforce training opportunities across the UK. Further research is required to explore student feedback and comparisons of effectiveness comparing different modes of training delivery, especially in light of the pandemic, which has forced organisations and higher education institutions to develop more digital and distance learning approaches to their portfolios.

Originality/value

This novel research provides an evaluation of the only higher education credit-bearing modules in the UK focussed solely upon the OPD workforce and aligned with the national drive for non-credit bearing awareness level training “knowledge and understanding framework” (KUF).

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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