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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Bang Nguyen and Lyndon Simkin

The purpose of this paper is to study what happens when firms misuse customers’ information and perceptions of unfairness arise because of privacy concerns. It explores a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study what happens when firms misuse customers’ information and perceptions of unfairness arise because of privacy concerns. It explores a unifying theoretical framework of perceptions of unfairness, explained by the advantaged–disadvantaged (AD) continuum. It integrates the push, pull and mooring (PPM) model of migration for understanding the drivers of unfairness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual and develops a theoretical model based on extant research.

Findings

Using the PPM model, the paper explores the effects of information-based marketing tactics on the AD framework in the form of two types of customers. Findings from the review suggest that three variables have a leading direct effect on the AD customers. Traditionally, the fairness literature focuses on price, but findings show that service and communication variables impact customers’ unfairness perceptions. This paper examines the importance of these variables, in the context of an AD framework, to help explain unfairness and consider the implications.

Originality/value

To explain information misuse and unfairness perceptions, the paper develops a unifying theoretical framework of perceptions of unfairness, explained by linking the PPM model of migration with the AD continuum.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2018

Arnold Japutra, Yuksel Ekinci and Lyndon Simkin

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between brand attachment and consumers’ positive and negative behaviours. Furthermore, this study examines…

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3189

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between brand attachment and consumers’ positive and negative behaviours. Furthermore, this study examines the moderating effects of attachment styles on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a survey of 432 respondents, and the data are analysed using the structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

This study empirically supports that brand attachment and attachment styles (i.e. anxiety attachment and avoidance attachment) are distinct. Brand attachment influences consumers’ not only positive behaviour (i.e. brand loyalty) but also negative behaviours, such as trash-talking, schadenfreude and anti-brand actions. The findings of the study suggest that only avoidance attachment style moderates the relationships between brand attachment and these consumer behaviours. The link between brand attachment and brand loyalty is attenuated for high-attachment-avoidance consumers. In contrast, the links between brand attachment and trash-talking, schadenfreude and anti-brand actions are strengthened.

Practical implications

This study assists marketing managers in understanding that a strong brand attachment may result in negative behaviours that can harm a company’s brand image. Thus, building a strong relationship with consumers will not always be beneficial. Companies should be aware of the consequences of building relationships with consumers who have a high level of attachment anxiety and/or avoidance.

Originality/value

This paper highlights that brand attachment not only influences brand loyalty behaviour but also three negative behaviours: trash-talking, schadenfreude and anti-brand actions. Moreover, the links between brand attachment and negative behaviours are strengthened when consumers have a high level of attachment avoidance.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2018

Arnold Japutra, Yuksel Ekinci, Lyndon Simkin and Bang Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of ideal self-congruence in instigating two types of negative consumer behaviours – compulsive buying and external…

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2776

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of ideal self-congruence in instigating two types of negative consumer behaviours – compulsive buying and external trash-talking – and the mediating role of brand attachment on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were designed using a structural equation modelling methodology. Study 1a was based on a mail survey of 280 respondents, whereas Study 1b was based on an electronic survey of 152 respondents. Study 1b was conducted to test the external validity of the research model.

Findings

In Study 1a, ideal self-congruence affects emotional brand attachment and in turn emotional brand attachment affects compulsive buying behaviour and external trash-talking. The mediation analysis indicates that emotional brand attachment mediates the relationships. Study 1b offers support to the results of Study 1a.

Practical implications

From a practical point of view, this study is useful for policymakers seeking to regulate and prevent excessive consumerism. For marketers, they should understand that brand attachment leads to compulsive buying and external trash-talking, which may provide immediate benefit for the brand or the firm. However, marketers should understand that these two negative behaviours may harm the firm image and consumers’ well-being in the long run.

Social implications

Apart from practical implications, firms should consider alleviating compulsive buying, as it is harmful to society. Similarly, excessive external trash-talking may lead to physical aggression. Consumers expect firms to be socially responsible. Thus, firms should start conducting activities that promote responsible shopping and reduce external trash-talking.

Originality/value

The study highlights a dark side of ideal self-congruence and brand attachment. The results suggest that ideal self-congruence with the help of emotional brand attachment predicts compulsive buying behaviour and external trash-talking. This may not only damage brand image but also the consumers’ well-being.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Sung Ho Han, Bang Nguyen and Lyndon Simkin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dynamic process and the meaning of symbolic consumption according to the three symbolic needs (i.e. status needs, social…

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2544

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dynamic process and the meaning of symbolic consumption according to the three symbolic needs (i.e. status needs, social needs, status and social needs) to understand how symbolic messages are conveyed when consumers choose a brand.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops three dynamic models, categorized according to the consumers’ needs. The conceptual framework consists of the six constructs: collectivism/individualism, brand reputation, self-congruence, brand affect, brand identification and brand loyalty. Twelve hypotheses were developed and tested. Data were collected from consumers who had experienced well-known global chain restaurant brands. The three models were tested using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

Findings highlight the important mediating role of brand affect in symbolic consumption, which previously has not been revealed empirically. Moreover, it is found that self-congruence does not mediate the relationship between brand reputation, collectivism/individualism and brand affect, despite its prominence in previous symbolic consumption studies. In the status and social needs models, brand reputation mediates between collectivism/individualism and self-congruence, brand identification, brand affect and brand loyalty.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical paper to investigate symbolic consumption in the context of three types of models, according to symbolic needs, in the context of restaurant consumption. The study also identifies the major components of the consumer’s symbolic needs based on the attributes of symbolic consumption. Moreover, this study reveals that when both social needs and status needs are mixed, a hierarchy exists between consumers’ symbolic needs. Finally, the study makes an important contribution to the literature by applying the concept of brand affect to symbolic consumption research and exploring the relationships between the external motivational factors and the internal elements of symbolic consumption.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Lee Quinn, Sally Dibb, Lyndon Simkin, Ana Canhoto and Mathew Analogbei

This paper aims to establish how strategic target-market selection decisions are shaped, challenged and driven in response to the rapidly evolving technological landscape…

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9693

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish how strategic target-market selection decisions are shaped, challenged and driven in response to the rapidly evolving technological landscape. The authors critically evaluate the implications of these changes for the role of marketers and the organizational function of marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses qualitative methods. Key-informant interviews are conducted among senior organizational practitioners within client-side organizations, digital agencies and strategic marketing consultancies, seeking to contrast their views.

Findings

The findings reveal an erosion of responsibility for the integrated strategic role of marketing decision-making. In particular, the authors reveal that the evolving digital landscape has precipitated a sense of crisis for marketers and the role of marketing within the firm. This extends beyond simply remedying a skills-gap and is triggering a transformation that has repercussions for the future of marketing and its practice, thus diminishing functional accountability.

Research limitations/implications

The findings have long-term implications for marketing as a strategic organizational function of the firm and for marketing as a practice.

Originality/value

The study considers an increasingly digitalized marketplace and the associated impact of big data for the function of marketing. It reveals the changing scope of strategic marketing practice and functional accountability.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Lyndon Simkin

The exponents of marketing planning have for over a decade warned of the internal operational, cultural and process impediments to the effective implementation of…

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8556

Abstract

The exponents of marketing planning have for over a decade warned of the internal operational, cultural and process impediments to the effective implementation of marketing plans. Recently, they have been joined by the market segmentation specialists and many of the “gurus” of modern marketing management. Unfortunately, the syllabi of most business school marketing courses and the content of their recommended textbooks fail to reflect this concern for implementation issues. Marketers must provide the necessary internal operational and resource requisites for effective marketing planning, utilise suitable processes for undertaking these activities, and manage the on‐going implementation of the recommended marketing plans.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Lyndon Simkin

The literature has for more than two decades warned of operational, organizational, dysfunctional, market and managerial barriers hindering the actioning of marketing…

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7567

Abstract

The literature has for more than two decades warned of operational, organizational, dysfunctional, market and managerial barriers hindering the actioning of marketing plans and indeed acting as hurdles impeding the very activities at the heart of effective marketing management. Many observed problems stemmed from businesses failing to practice marketing or produce marketing plans. Most organizations do now produce marketing plans. However, it is clear from this study’s findings that there is still a significant set of factors acting to impede the progress of marketing planning. Many of these barriers are different in nature to those previously cited. Certain themes link with the growing literature examining internal and relationship marketing. Exponents of marketing planning must reflect this evolving pattern of hurdles in their approach to expediting marketing planning.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Lyndon Simkin

The creation of a target market strategy is integral to developing an effective business strategy. The concept of market segmentation is often cited as pivotal to…

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14867

Abstract

Purpose

The creation of a target market strategy is integral to developing an effective business strategy. The concept of market segmentation is often cited as pivotal to establishing a target market strategy, yet all too often business‐to‐business marketers utilise little more than trade sectors or product groups as the basis for their groupings of customers, rather than customers' characteristics and buying behaviour. The purpose of this paper is to offer a solution for managers, focusing on customer purchasing behaviour, which evolves from the organisation's existing criteria used for grouping its customers.

Design/methodology/approach

One of the underlying reasons managers fail to embrace best practice market segmentation is their inability to manage the transition from how target markets in an organisation are currently described to how they might look when based on customer characteristics, needs, purchasing behaviour and decision‐making. Any attempt to develop market segments should reflect the inability of organisations to ignore their existing customer group classification schemes and associated customer‐facing operational practices, such as distribution channels and sales force allocations.

Findings

A straightforward process has been derived and applied, enabling organisations to practice market segmentation in an evolutionary manner, facilitating the transition to customer‐led target market segments. This process also ensures commitment from the managers responsible for implementing the eventual segmentation scheme. This paper outlines the six stages of this process and presents an illustrative example from the agrichemicals sector, supported by other cases.

Research implications

The process presented in this paper for embarking on market segmentation focuses on customer purchasing behaviour rather than business sectors or product group classifications ‐ which is true to the concept of market segmentation ‐ but in a manner that participating managers find non‐threatening. The resulting market segments have their basis in the organisation's existing customer classification schemes and are an iteration to which most managers readily buy‐in.

Originality/value

Despite the size of the market segmentation literature, very few papers offer step‐by‐step guidance for developing customer‐focused market segments in business‐to‐business marketing. The analytical tool for assessing customer purchasing deployed in this paper originally was created to assist in marketing planning programmes, but has since proved its worth as the foundation for creating segmentation schemes in business marketing, as described in this paper.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Lyndon Simkin

“Marketing is marketing, irrespective of the product or marketplace”. This is a theme common to many introductory marketing texts and degree courses. The two most common…

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29290

Abstract

“Marketing is marketing, irrespective of the product or marketplace”. This is a theme common to many introductory marketing texts and degree courses. The two most common exceptions cited to this proposition are buying behaviour models between consumers and business buyers and the extended ingredients of the services marketing mix. While the overall sentiments of marketing hold true across product and market boundaries, perhaps the differences are in fact more marked? Intends to spark some discussion pertaining to the extent to which marketers can safely generalise when discussing the nature and characteristics of marketing. Are we correct in offering students and in‐company training programmes generalisations that cut across the marketing domain? Are we doing justice to the core nuances if we simply draw out the variations between consumer goods, services, industrial and business‐to‐business marketing? Is there a different perspective that should, in the new millennium, be the focus of textbooks and marketing courses?

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Lyndon P. Simkin

Store Location Assessment Model (SLAM) was developed initially toassist retail management in the assessment of store locations. Used bymany of the UK′s leading retailers…

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2375

Abstract

Store Location Assessment Model (SLAM) was developed initially to assist retail management in the assessment of store locations. Used by many of the UK′s leading retailers has shown the benefit of using the model as a general retail performance evaluation tool in addition to its function of assessing store locations. The development of the model while concentrating on its key applications in setting performance targets for existing sites, rationalising property portfolios, enabling management to understand the interactions of their particular retailing environment, and being able to assess new store locations is discussed. SLAM is in use in various fields ranging from consumer electricals, dry cleaning, fast food, clothing and petroleum retailing. In each application the pertinent variables change as do their weightings.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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