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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Cath Tarling, Paul Jones and Lyndon Murphy

This study considers the influences of family business and exposure to family business ideas upon students and graduates during their transition from higher education (HE…

Abstract

Purpose

This study considers the influences of family business and exposure to family business ideas upon students and graduates during their transition from higher education (HE) toward career identification of entrepreneurship. It explores influences, values and experiences actively impacting on business start-up following exposure to family business or business ideas.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory approach was adopted to investigate the wider student/graduate transition between HE and business start-up support provision. The aim of the interviews undertaken was to investigate those influences actively impacting on business start-up provision and reflect upon the complexities within the student journey through transition toward business start-up. The researchers investigated stories, experiences and insights of nascent and practicing entrepreneurs acquiring rich qualitative evidence.

Findings

This study evaluates the influences impacting upon practicing entrepreneurs following exposure to family business and awareness of business ideas arising from immediate or extended family prior to undertaking a business start-up. The findings inform discussions about family role models and contribute to the development of enterprise education pedagogy. It is found that individuals attachment to business and family business values are strongly formed concepts that motivate and steer entrepreneurial direction.

Practical implications

This article contributes to development of enterprise and entrepreneurship educator pedagogy and explores use of entrepreneurial role models and positive learning experiences gained through personal exposure to family business and ideas.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a fuller understanding of the potential for positive influence through exposure to familial businesses, growing up around businesses and awareness of business ideas arising from immediate or extended family. Integration of learning opportunities with development of pedagogy will be of interest to the enterprise education community.

Details

Education + Training , vol. 58 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Lyndon Murphy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between social capital and the directors' duty to promote the success of the company and to foster business…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between social capital and the directors' duty to promote the success of the company and to foster business relationships, which is a comparatively under‐researched issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken focuses on the concept of social capital, its various forms and influence on business performance. Ultimately, the paper explores ways in which directors' duties as stated in s.172 (1) of the Companies Act 2006 may affect the building and maintenance of forms of social capital.

Findings

It seems that it is likely that by complying with s.172 (1) directors will build forms of social capital, which in turn will enhance the business performance of companies in aspects such as innovative activity, transaction costs, and productivity. Consequently, the building of social capital is likely to promote the success of the company.

Originality/value

It can be stated that s.172 (1) CA 2006, is a potentially paradigmatic move in the way in which company directors undertake their business and view their company's stakeholders (Dignam and Lowry). Davies appears to agree with this view commenting upon the “ideological significance” of the introduction of s.172. It certainly seems that the inclusion of a duty to consider the importance of fostering business relationships implicitly promotes the pursuit of social capital.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Alexandra Dobson and Chris Gale

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Martin McCracken

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Bang Nguyen and Lyndon Simkin

The purpose of this paper is to study what happens when firms misuse customers’ information and perceptions of unfairness arise because of privacy concerns. It explores a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study what happens when firms misuse customers’ information and perceptions of unfairness arise because of privacy concerns. It explores a unifying theoretical framework of perceptions of unfairness, explained by the advantaged–disadvantaged (AD) continuum. It integrates the push, pull and mooring (PPM) model of migration for understanding the drivers of unfairness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual and develops a theoretical model based on extant research.

Findings

Using the PPM model, the paper explores the effects of information-based marketing tactics on the AD framework in the form of two types of customers. Findings from the review suggest that three variables have a leading direct effect on the AD customers. Traditionally, the fairness literature focuses on price, but findings show that service and communication variables impact customers’ unfairness perceptions. This paper examines the importance of these variables, in the context of an AD framework, to help explain unfairness and consider the implications.

Originality/value

To explain information misuse and unfairness perceptions, the paper develops a unifying theoretical framework of perceptions of unfairness, explained by linking the PPM model of migration with the AD continuum.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

Lyndon Jones

Determining effectiveness areas Effectiveness measures output, not input. Effectiveness is the result of what a manager achieves, not what he does. Perspiration should not…

Abstract

Determining effectiveness areas Effectiveness measures output, not input. Effectiveness is the result of what a manager achieves, not what he does. Perspiration should not be confused with effectiveness. But what one person regards as output may not coincide with the views of his boss. To avoid this happening, both persons should complete separately a Job Analysis Work Sheet. This requires that boss and subordinate each:

Details

Education + Training, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2017

Cheryl Joseph

Abstract

Details

You’re Hired!
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-489-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1976

Lyndon Jones

Effectiveness measures output, not input. Effectiveness is the result of what a manager achieves, not what he does. But what one person regards as output may not coincide…

Abstract

Effectiveness measures output, not input. Effectiveness is the result of what a manager achieves, not what he does. But what one person regards as output may not coincide with the views of his boss. To avoid this happening, both persons should complete separately a Job Analysis Work Sheet. This requires that boss and subordinate each:

Details

Education + Training, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2018

Paul A. Pautler

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the…

Abstract

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the preferences and ideology of the FTC’s leaders, developments in the field of economics, and the tenor of the times. The over-riding current role is to provide well considered, unbiased economic advice regarding antitrust and consumer protection law enforcement cases to the legal staff and the Commission. The second role, which long ago was primary, is to provide reports on investigations of various industries to the public and public officials. This role was more recently called research or “policy R&D”. A third role is to advocate for competition and markets both domestically and internationally. As a practical matter, the provision of economic advice to the FTC and to the legal staff has required that the economists wear “two hats,” helping the legal staff investigate cases and provide evidence to support law enforcement cases while also providing advice to the legal bureaus and to the Commission on which cases to pursue (thus providing “a second set of eyes” to evaluate cases). There is sometimes a tension in those functions because building a case is not the same as evaluating a case. Economists and the Bureau of Economics have provided such services to the FTC for over 100 years proving that a sub-organization can survive while playing roles that sometimes conflict. Such a life is not, however, always easy or fun.

Details

Healthcare Antitrust, Settlements, and the Federal Trade Commission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-599-9

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Soo-Hoon Lee, Thomas W. Lee and Phillip H. Phan

Workplace voice is well-established and encompasses behaviors such as prosocial voice, informal complaints, grievance filing, and whistleblowing, and it focuses on…

Abstract

Workplace voice is well-established and encompasses behaviors such as prosocial voice, informal complaints, grievance filing, and whistleblowing, and it focuses on interactions between the employee and supervisor or the employee and the organizational collective. In contrast, our chapter focuses on employee prosocial advocacy voice (PAV), which the authors define as prosocial voice behaviors aimed at preventing harm or promoting constructive changes by advocating on behalf of others. In the context of a healthcare organization, low quality and unsafe patient care are salient and objectionable states in which voice can motivate actions on behalf of the patient to improve information exchanges, governance, and outreach activities for safer outcomes. The authors draw from the theory and research on responsibility to intersect with theories on information processing, accountability, and stakeholders that operate through voice between the employee-patient, employee-coworker, and employee-profession, respectively, to propose a model of PAV in patient-centered healthcare. The authors complete the model by suggesting intervening influences and barriers to PAV that may affect patient-centered outcomes.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

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