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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Rick T. Wilson and Lyn S. Amine

The purpose of this paper is to draw upon the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm in order to assess the “who, when, where, and how” questions about use of resources in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw upon the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm in order to assess the “who, when, where, and how” questions about use of resources in shaping market positioning by global and local firms in a transitional economy (TE).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes a longitudinal case‐study approach to present and discuss resource asymmetry between global and local advertising agencies operating in Hungary.

Findings

RBV proves to be valuable theory, revealing an interesting and unexpected range of sources and types of resources that are being used to advantage by local and global agencies competing in Hungary. Earlier historical asymmetries in resource endowments contributed to a notable division between global and local agencies according to market sector. Specific resources, such as reputation, access to global resources, and use of Western‐style business practices, proved beneficial to global firms after Hungarian market liberalization in 1989, while interpersonal relationships have emerged as a valuable resource, regardless of context.

Research limitations/implications

Use of a convenience cross‐sectional sampling method may contribute to some halo effects and personal bias. Additionally, results may be limited in their applicability only to the advertising industry and to Hungary as a specific TE. Future research should validate these findings in other industries and other TEs.

Practical implications

Findings from this study offer marketing managers operating in TEs fresh insights into how asymmetries in resource endowments at various points in an infant industry's life cycle act to influence choice of market positioning strategies and subsequent success of firms competing in the industry.

Originality/value

This paper provides rich detail of the advertising industry in Hungary, suggesting directions for study of advertising industries in other TEs, not only in Eastern Europe. Results from this study increase confidence in the generalizability of RBV theory by demonstrating its usefulness and flexibility when applied to an unusual context in terms of time and space.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Lyn Wilson

This paper sets out to describe a small case study which aimed to unravel the complexity of pupil participation in secondary schools.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to describe a small case study which aimed to unravel the complexity of pupil participation in secondary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

A secondary school in the south of England was selected as the case. Four group interviews, one individual interview and collection of relevant Healthy School documents provided data from which to begin to understand the mechanism, context and outcome of pupil participation in the case school.

Findings

The paper attempts to illuminate the theoretical underpinning for pupil participation with comments made by staff and pupils from the case study school. The mechanisms of participation are discussed briefly; however, it is recognised that individual schools will select initiatives according to their preference. Tentative evidence of a positive outcome for pupils who participate in school decision making is revealed. By exploring the context, or conditions, under which involvement occurs possible strategies for effective pupil participation are elicited.

Practical implications

The paper offers a framework for effective pupil participation.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to go some way towards illuminating the theory and practice of effective pupil participation.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Jill Manthorpe and Stephen Martineau

Local serious case reviews (SCRs) (now Safeguarding Adults Reviews (SARs)) may be held in England when a vulnerable adult dies or is harmed or at risk of being so, and…

Abstract

Purpose

Local serious case reviews (SCRs) (now Safeguarding Adults Reviews (SARs)) may be held in England when a vulnerable adult dies or is harmed or at risk of being so, and local agencies may not have responded to the abuse or neglect. The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a documentary analysis of these reviews to ascertain what recommendations are made about pressure ulcer prevention and treatment at home, setting these in the context of safeguarding, and assessing what lessons may be learned by considering them as a group. This analysis is presented at a time of increased interest of the risks of pressure ulcers among frail and very ill populations; and debates about the interface of neglect and safeguarding systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Identification of SCRs from England where the person who died or who was harmed had been suffering from pressure ulcers or their synonyms in their home; termed home acquired pressure ulcers. Narrative and textual analysis of documents summarising the reports was undertaken to explore the reviews’ observations and recommendations. The main circumstances, recommendations and common themes were identified.

Findings

The authors located 18 relevant SCRs, one of which was a case summary and two SARs covering pressure ulcers that had been acquired or worsened when the individual was living at home. Most of these inquired into the individual’s circumstances, their acceptance of care and support, the actions of others in their family or professionals, and the events leading up to the death or harm. Failures to have followed guidance were noted among professionals, and problems within wider health and care systems were identified. Recommendations include calls for greater training on pressure ulcers for home care workers, but also greater risk communication and better adherence to clinical guidelines. A small number focus on neglect by family members, others on self-neglect, including some vulnerable adults’ lack of capacity to care for themselves or to access help. In some SCRs the presence of a pressure ulcer is only mentioned circumstantially.

Research limitations/implications

The value of this documentary analysis is that it draws on case examples and scrutiny at local level. Future research could consider the related findings of SARs as they emerge, similar documents from the rest of the UK, and international perspectives

Practical implications

This analysis highlights the multitude of complex social and health situations that gives rise to pressure ulcers among people living at home. Several SCRs observe problems in the wider communications with and between health and care providers. Nonetheless poor care quality and negligence are reported in some SCRs. Cases of self-neglect give rise to challenging practice situations. While practices and policies about poor quality care and safeguarding in the form of prevention of wilful neglect are emerging, they often relate to hospital and care home settings. Preventing and treating pressure ulcers may be part of safeguarding in its broadest sense but raises the question of whether training, expertise and support on this subject or wider self-neglect and neglect by others are sufficiently robust for home care workers and community-based professionals.

Originality/value

The value of having a set of SCRs is that they lend themselves to analysis and comparison. This analysis is the first to focus on home acquired pressure ulcers and to address wider considerations related to safeguarding policy and practice. Pressure ulcers feature in several SCRs either as contextual information about the vulnerable adults’ health-status or as indications of poor care. The potential value of examining home acquired pressure ulcers as a key line of enquiry is that they are “visible” in the system, with consensus about what they are, how to measure them and what is optimal care and treatment. In the new Care Act 2014 context, they may still feature in safeguarding inquiries as symptoms of failings in systems or of personal culpability for poor care. Learning from them may be of interest to other parts of the UK.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Andrew Robson and Lyn Robinson

This paper aims to gain insights from existing models of information behaviour, building on them to develop a new model which, unlike most others, encompasses both…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to gain insights from existing models of information behaviour, building on them to develop a new model which, unlike most others, encompasses both information seeking and communication. By identifying key factors affecting the successful communication and use of information, it is hoped that the model will be of practical value both to information providers and to users.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a literature search and analysis of well‐established models of information seeking and of communication, from which a new conceptual model is constructed.

Findings

Existing models have elements in common, though most models in library and information science focus on information seeking and the information user, while those from the field of communications focus on the communicator and the communication process. A new model is proposed that includes key elements of existing models and takes into account not just the information seeker but also the communicator or information provider.

Originality/value

The model developed in this paper is the first to combine elements from both information seeking and communication models. Being built on previous research, it can be used to investigate the practical value of the model itself and the elements that it has in common with other models.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Amanda Spink and Jannica Heinström

Ever since our cognitive make-up allowed it, human beings have used their information behaviour abilities to help them survive. Information behaviour evolved in response…

Abstract

Ever since our cognitive make-up allowed it, human beings have used their information behaviour abilities to help them survive. Information behaviour evolved in response to the need by early humans to benefit from information that could not be immediately accessible in the nearby environment or obtained through communication. Humans developed an information behaviour ability, including processes of information sense making, foraging, seeking, organising and using. Information behaviour brought several benefits to early humans, including greater influence and control over their environment, and the degree in which they could use the environment for their own gain and survival. Information behaviour thus brought several advantages for the survival of early humans, and consequently emerged as a genetically favoured trait (Spink, 2010).

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Aysu Akalın, Kemal Yıldırım, Çiğdem Yücel and Can Güngör

The intent and aim of the research was to look at a particular house type i.e. a terraced house with four floors, which is one of the popular designs commonly used in the…

Abstract

The intent and aim of the research was to look at a particular house type i.e. a terraced house with four floors, which is one of the popular designs commonly used in the last ten years in mass housing projects in Turkey. There are four alternatives of the type related with the cross-sectional relationship with the ground floor level. Emphasis was placed upon the "semi-cellar type" assuming that even though the level of residential satisfaction gradually increases with the possibility of interpreting the use of the open-plan floor space, and by proposing new design elements to create more adaptable and flexible spaces, the users may still experience dissatisfaction with designs where the space cannot be revised. With the use of a questionnaire, participants judged their own house as a whole and evaluated its uses for different functions and activities, complained in respect of changes required, and finally outlined their plans for the future. Despite the high level of satisfaction with having a garden (a unique characteristic in apartment-saturated Ankara), the aspect of dissatisfaction mostly referred to was the kitchen-garden relationship (or lack thereof). The residents, especially the older ones, were generally dissatisfied with the multi-storey design of their house. They prefer to remain on the backyard level without changing floors in different seasons. Besides, the users spending the longest time in the house complained more than the others and the people spending variable time in the house stated that they preferred to change the floors in different seasons. As compared to larger families, the smaller families were more likely to change floors.

Details

Open House International, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Andrew Robson and Lyn Robinson

This study investigated the application in the field of healthcare of a recently developed model of information seeking and communication. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated the application in the field of healthcare of a recently developed model of information seeking and communication. The purpose of this paper is to test the model’s validity and to identify insights that it may provide.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate the model’s application to information users, the findings from published literature on physicians’ information behaviour were studied. To investigate its application to information providers, interviews were carried out with staff working for the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and with employees of pharmaceutical companies. The findings were examined using deductive content analysis.

Findings

The findings endorse the validity of the model, with minor modifications. The model provides practical insights into the behaviour of both users and providers of information and the factors that influence them. It can be used to identify ways in which information behaviour may be positively modified in both finding and communicating healthcare information.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates the practical value of a new model of information behaviour which was developed using insights from earlier models. In doing so it answers criticisms that research in library and information science often fails to build on previous research and that it has little practical usefulness.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 71 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Ellen D. Sutton, Richard Feinberg, Cynthia R. Levine, Jennie S. Sandberg and Janice M. Wilson

Academic librarians are frequently called upon to provide instruction in relatively unfamiliar disciplines. This article presents introductory information for librarians…

Abstract

Academic librarians are frequently called upon to provide instruction in relatively unfamiliar disciplines. This article presents introductory information for librarians providing bibliographic instruction (BI) in the field of psychology. Its primary purpose is to identify key readings from the library science and psychology literature that provide a basis for informed delivery of psychology BI. These works are fully identified in the list of references at the end of this article. Because the primary purpose of discipline‐specific bibliographic instruction is to teach the skills necessary for retrieval of the products of scholarship in that discipline, we begin with a discussion of scholarly communication and documentation, which describes how scholars and researchers within psychology communicate research findings and theoretical developments in the discipline. The major emphasis of this article is on formal, group instruction rather than individualized instruction, although much of the information will be applicable to both types.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

David Bawden and Lyn Robinson

The introduction of the printing press to Europe in the mid‐fifteenth century, and its effect on the communication of information, are considered, largely by reference to…

Abstract

The introduction of the printing press to Europe in the mid‐fifteenth century, and its effect on the communication of information, are considered, largely by reference to the writings of Elisabeth Eisenstein. Analogies and similarities with the impact of the Internet are identified, as a way of gaining insight into the current communications revolution.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Gordon Wills

Describes the efforts of the owner/directors of a private limitedcompany to put into place a succession strategy. Considers three majorthemes: second generation…

Abstract

Describes the efforts of the owner/directors of a private limited company to put into place a succession strategy. Considers three major themes: second generation entrepreneurs/management succession; action learning as a human resource development strategy and philosophy; and the learning organization. Concludes that people (and organizations) “learn” best from the priorities of the business, once they have been identified, and that organizational learning is really based on institutionalization of what has been learned – requisite learning.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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