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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Henry Briscoe, Sarah Ashworth and Lyn Shelton

Individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) develop mental health difficulties at similar rates to individuals in the general population. Using Patient Reported Outcome…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) develop mental health difficulties at similar rates to individuals in the general population. Using Patient Reported Outcome Measures can help track deterioration and improve the outcomes of individuals seeking help for their difficulties. The Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation-Learning Disabilities (CORE-LD) is a multi-trait measure of psychological distress which has shown moderate test-rest reliability. However, the CORE-LD is yet to be validated for the population it was designed for. Therefore the purpose of this paper is to establish the concurrent validity of the CORE-LD in a population of individuals with a diagnosis of mild–moderate ID.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants with a diagnosis of mild–moderate ID, as well as other co-morbidities, were recruited from two UK inpatient hospitals and asked to complete the CORE-LD and its general population counterpart the Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM).

Findings

Statistically significant differences were found regarding the CORE-LD across gender, with females scoring higher on the CORE-LD than males. There was no significant difference between security levels. The overall mean scores on each measure were moderately correlated. The data from this analysis suggest a significant positive correlation (rs=0.68).

Originality/value

This initial study’s findings have demonstrated the CORE-LD may have concurrent validity, and further replication studies in larger and more diverse samples are needed.

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2020

Rachel Craven and Lyn Shelton

This study aims to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the Mindfulness module of the “I Can Feel Good” programme, an adapted dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) informed skills…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the Mindfulness module of the “I Can Feel Good” programme, an adapted dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) informed skills programme for a group of intellectually disabled offenders (IDOs).

Design/methodology/approach

The programme module was delivered to a group of five male IDOs detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 (Revised 2007) at an intellectual disability (ID) rehabilitation hospital based in the UK. The mindfulness module was 12 sessions in length, and it was evaluated using the emotional problems scale (EPS) and the cognitive and affective mindfulness scale-revised (CAMS-R) self-assessment and observational scale. These measures were administered pre- and post-module and used the staff report scales as a primary source of evaluation.

Findings

Non-parametric testing revealed that there was a reduction in scores post module on the externalising behaviour problem scale of the EPS and increased scores on the CAMS-R observational scale, which would indicate clinical improvement in the IDO’s behavioural presentation, although it was not statistically significant. The internalising behaviour problem scale showed increased signs of anxiety post module, this could be related to increased self-awareness. The CAMS-R self-reported measure indicated reduced mindfulness qualities following the module.

Originality/value

The results indicate that following the mindfulness module, there was a reduced level of challenging behaviour displayed by the patients with increased signs of emotional regulation. There was also an observed reduction in symptoms of depression and low self-esteem post module.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Rachel Craven and Lyn Shelton

Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are known to experience increased emotional and behavioural concerns. The study aims to assess whether detained ID patients with a…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are known to experience increased emotional and behavioural concerns. The study aims to assess whether detained ID patients with a forensic history (IDPF) have increased difficulty managing their impulse control in comparison to detained ID patients without a forensic history (IDP). Using the externalising behaviour problems (EBP) subscale of the EPS, the study aims to compare the differences between the IDFP and IDP groups.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 60 patients with ID detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 (Revised 2007) were assessed using the behaviour rating scale of the EPS. The outcome scores of the EBP were used to examine any observed differences between the scores of forensically involved patients [n = 34] and those without a forensic history [n = 26]. It was hypothesised that patients with a forensic history would display higher scoring on externalised behavioural problems (EBP) than patients without such a history.

Findings

Non-parametric testing revealed that there were no significant differences in EBP scoring between the two sample groups. These findings indicate that, for patients in the present study, no differences were detected in the presentation of these two distinct groups. In fact, with the exception of the verbal aggression subscale of the EBP, the other three subscales (physical aggression, non-compliance and hyperactivity) show that actually the IDP group displayed the higher ranked means in these subscales when compared with the forensically involved group.

Originality/value

These results indicate possible increased treatment needs within the IDP group and question whether offending history is necessarily a reliable predictor of ongoing hostility and behavioural concerns within similar inpatient services.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Lyn Shelton, Julia Stone and Belinda Winder

The study explored the factor structure and reliability of the Community Attitudes Toward Sex Offenders (CATSO) scale. The study also included an impression management scale.

Abstract

Purpose

The study explored the factor structure and reliability of the Community Attitudes Toward Sex Offenders (CATSO) scale. The study also included an impression management scale.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 441 adults (134 male, 280 female, 27 ns) participated in this study from three populations: staff at a category B prison (n=62), staff at a category C sex offender prison (n=102) and staff at a UK university (n=248). Questionnaire packs included information/consent, demographics, the CATSO and the Paulhus impression management scale.

Findings

Data were excluded where the Paulhus score was <1 or >12 (faking good/bad present). Confirmatory factor analysis with alternative models indicated the scale did not meet any of the requirements for an acceptable fit. Cronbach's α confirmed that two of the four sub‐scales were not internally consistent. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted following the removal of items with poor item‐total correlation and/or low/high facility index and, following parallel analysis, a revised two factor solution was examined. The CATSO needs revision; it is unclear whether it is sufficiently reliable and valid for use in the UK. The need for a valid/reliable tool to assess attitudes toward sexual offenders remains an important goal for researchers.

Originality/value

Church et al. (2008) developed a scale (CATSO) to measure attitudes toward sex offenders; the scale is being increasingly widely used across a range of populations, including the general public and correctional staff. This research identifies significant problems with the scale in terms of factor structure and reliability of the sub‐scales. This paper advises a rethink of the CATSO by the scale authors and suggest the scale is not currently useable.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Mark E. Shelton

94

Abstract

Details

Collection Building, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Heidi Lyn Hadley

This paper aims to examine how evangelical teachers’ religious identities influence their interpretation and teaching of texts in high school English Language Arts classrooms…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how evangelical teachers’ religious identities influence their interpretation and teaching of texts in high school English Language Arts classrooms. Further, this paper examines how evangelical teachers make choices about how to balance the demands of their religious and teacher identities as they interact with texts in their own classrooms.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Derridean deconstruction of the concept of ethical decision-making, the author uses critical discourse analysis to examine a conversation between two evangelical teachers as they talk about the tensions they feel as they teach The Crucible with their high school–aged students.

Findings

The findings show evangelical teachers’ religious and teaching identities were in tension across three themes: literary analytic frameworks, authorial intent and eternal truths and evangelism and fellowship.

Originality/value

By highlighting how evangelical teachers’ religious and teaching identities influence their classroom decisions, teaching practices and textual interpretations, this study offers another pathway through which teacher educators and researchers might examine the connection between teachers’ religious and teaching identities with the intent to invite more complexity into literary analysis.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

In those frightening years between the two Wars and governments in France came and went with dismal frequency, it used to be said that any French Government which permitted food…

Abstract

In those frightening years between the two Wars and governments in France came and went with dismal frequency, it used to be said that any French Government which permitted food prices to rise had no chance whatever of surviving, and the result was that food was bountiful and incredibly cheap. Times have changed dramatically but not the attitude of people to the price and availibility of food and, in particular of political control; this is very much the same as always. Mostly, it revolves around the woman and what she sees as an abuse, greed and taking mean advantage of prevailing conditions and, make no mistake, this will be reflected in the political field; in the way she votes. It has happened in previous elections; it will happen in even greater degree in the next election and, although not decisive, it can have a not insignificant impact. None know better than the housewife how meaningless is the smug talk of the politicians when it comes to food prices. Their attitude may not have been the main factor in throwing out the last Conservative Government; this was undoubtedly the fear that their continuance in office would result in widespread strikes and the serious effect these upheavals have on food prices (and other household necessit ies), but the votes of woman were an unimportant contribution. As it was, it mattered little to the muscle men of the trade unions which party is in power. Women's talk around the shops and supermarket's, up and down the High Street to‐day is one long grumble and disillusionment with politicians generally.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 81 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Abstract

Details

Explaining Growth in the Middle East
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44452-240-5

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2020

Ashleigh McFarlane and Emma Samsioe

This paper demonstrates how #50+ fashion Instagram influencers contribute to the social construction of cognitive age through their aesthetic digital labours.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper demonstrates how #50+ fashion Instagram influencers contribute to the social construction of cognitive age through their aesthetic digital labours.

Design/methodology/approach

Non-participative netnography was used in the form of visual and textual analysis of over 300 Instagram posts including images, captions and comments.

Findings

Findings reveal how outfit selection, background choices and bodily poses redefine expressions of look age through forms of aesthetic labour. Post-construction, hashtag and emoji usage illustrates how influencers refrain from directly posting about the fashion brands that they endorse. Instead, image and personality work visually attracts followers to politically charged posts which directly impact upon the social and cultural contexts where influencers are active. This ties into present-day wider societal discourses.

Practical implications

50+ fashion influencers have high spending power. Fashion brands should refrain from using #brand and collaborate in more subtle ways and concentrate on challenging the negativity of the old-age cliché.

Originality/value

The study advances theory on the social construction of age in fashion studies by combining cognitive age with aesthetic labour to identify the characteristics of the social phenomenon of the 50+ Instagram influencer. It applies principles from critical visual analysis to digital context, thereby advancing the qualitative netnographic toolkit.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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