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International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article

Lydia Makrides

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International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article

Lydia Makrides

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International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article

Lydia Makrides

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International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article

Lydia Makrides

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International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article

Shirley Wong, Julia Wong, Lydia Makrides and Swarna Weerasinghe

Type 2 diabetes mellitus has emerged as a major public health problem in Canada. Although the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes among black people is higher than that of white…

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus has emerged as a major public health problem in Canada. Although the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes among black people is higher than that of white people in Canada, there is no diabetes prevention programme specifically designed to address the behavioural and sociocultural influences on the development of the disease in the black communities. This paper discusses a proposed conceptual framework for the development and evaluation of a diabetes prevention programme that is culturally relevant and responsive to the black communities in Canada. The research literature and results of a recent pilot study that assessed the programming needs of four black communities provide the basis upon which the proposed framework is developed.

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Leadership in Health Services, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

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Article

Lydia Makrides

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International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Lydia Makrides, Gilles R. Dagenais, Arun Chockalingam, Jacques LeLorier, Natalie Kishchuk, Josie Richard, John Stewart, Christine Chin, Karine Alloul and Paula Veinot

The purpose of this paper is to docoment a randomized controlled trial, with follow‐up at three and six months, to determine the impact of a coronary risk factor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to docoment a randomized controlled trial, with follow‐up at three and six months, to determine the impact of a coronary risk factor modification program for employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Intervention participants received a 12‐week health promotion program involving exercise, education seminars, nutritional analysis and smoking cessation counselling. Outcome measures included differences in coronary risk factors of control and intervention participants between baseline and three and six‐month follow‐up visits.

Findings

The participants included 566 individuals employed in the Halifax area, Nova Scotia, Canada. They were between 19 and 66 years old with at least two modifiable coronary risk factors. There were statistically significant differences at three months in coronary risk score improvement, smoking cessation, physical activity level increases, body mass index reductions and serum cholesterol. At six months, improvements remained significant except for cholesterol. Reduction in blood pressure was not significantly different. Intervention participants compared to control participants showed significant differences in both cardiac and stroke risk at three and six‐month visits.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates that employees had a significant coronary disease risk reduction as a result of a relatively short health promotion intervention. Benefits three months post‐intervention were not sustained to the same extent as during the intervention. This underscores the need for long‐term commitment with lifestyle changes and raises the issue of the need for a comprehensive approach that also addresses environmental factors.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the current research base on this topic as there are few well‐designed studies to reduce coronary risk factors for employees.

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Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article

Lydia Makrides, Stephanie Heath, Jane Farquharson and Paula L. Veinot

Workplace health promotion initiatives are an effective way to reach adults, and provide safe and healthy working environments that support individual health. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace health promotion initiatives are an effective way to reach adults, and provide safe and healthy working environments that support individual health. The purpose of this project was to: learn how organizations/businesses define workplace health; assess employer support and commitment for workplace health initiatives; assess facilitators and barriers to workplace wellness/health; and understand workplace needs around evaluation and outcome measures.

Design/methodology/approach

A community partnership, Wellness Initiatives Network (WIN), was established to provide a forum for organizations in Atlantic Canada to share knowledge and experience on workplace health. Focus groups were conducted with businesses/organizations in the four Atlantic Provinces. Tape‐recorded transcriptions were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Ingredients for successful workplace health initiatives include onsite programs, the provision of incentives and recognition for employees, and the need to build awareness, understanding and commitment among managers who can help to create a supportive culture, which supports employee health. Measuring outcomes related to workplace health is critical.

Practical implications

Workplace health promotion should encompass a comprehensive approach that acknowledges the important roles of personal, social and environmental factors.

Originality/value

There is both interest and readiness to implement workplace health in Atlantic Canada. Workplace health is a responsibility of all – individual employees, employers and workplaces, and government. All stakeholders must be involved to help employees, workplaces and the health system cope with an aging population and concomitant increasing stresses at work and home. Engaging leaders is a critical step in building an integrated, comprehensive and sustainable approach to workplace health.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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