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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Lukumon O. Oyedele, Kwok Wai Tham, Babatunde E. Jaiyeoba and Moshood O. Fadeyi

The aim of this study is to construct a model that can be used to predict the architect's overall performance in the Nigeria building delivery process and to provide…

Abstract

The aim of this study is to construct a model that can be used to predict the architect's overall performance in the Nigeria building delivery process and to provide adequate understanding of the criteria which constitute the model. Architect performance criteria were identified from existing literature within the domain of architect responsibilities and developed into a two‐part questionnaire survey. The survey involves clients of recently completed building projects in Nigeria. The first part of the questionnaire survey consists of 71 clients which were used to construct the model while the second part consists of another 17 clients which were used to validate the model. Based on this data, a predictive discriminant analysis model of two‐group cases (good and poor performance) was developed. The model shows that the predicted architect's overall performance is significantly correlated with the actual validated client ratings (0.783 at 99% confidence interval). The results show that if architects want to achieve good performance, they should give a high level of performance to ‘effective communication of design to contractor and other participants’; ‘effective constructability review’; ‘assistance in quality management strategies and clarity and consistency of specification with drawings’. The study would give architects a fore knowledge on how to ensure good performance in their future enterprise.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

Saheed O. Ajayi, Lukumon O. Oyedele and Jamiu A. Dauda

Buildings and their construction activities consume a significant proportion of mineral resources excavated from nature and contribute a large percentage of CO2 in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Buildings and their construction activities consume a significant proportion of mineral resources excavated from nature and contribute a large percentage of CO2 in the atmosphere. As a way of improving the sustainability of building construction and operation, various sustainable design appraisal standards have been developed across nations. Albeit criticism of the appraisal standards, evidence shows that increasing sustainability of the built environment has been engendered by such appraisal tools as Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM), Code for Sustainable Homes (CfSH), Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and Comprehensive Assessment System for Built Environment Efficacy, among others. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the appraisal standards in engendering whole lifecycle environmental sustainability of the built environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to evaluate the adequacy of sustainability scores assigned to various lifecycle stages of buildings in the appraisal standards, four case studies of a block of classroom were modelled. Using Revit as a modelling platform, stage by stage lifecycle environmental impacts of the building were simulated through Green Building Studio and ATHENA Impact estimator. The resulting environmental impacts were then compared against the assessment score associated with each stage of building lifecycle in BREAAM and CfSH.

Findings

Results show that albeit the consensus that the appraisal standards engender sustainability practices in the AEC industry, total scores assigned to impacts at each stage of building lifecycle is disproportionate to the simulated whole-life environmental impacts associated with the stages in some instances.

Originality/value

As the study reveals both strengths and weaknesses in the existing sustainability appraisal standards, measures through which they can be tailored to resource efficiency and lifecycle environmental sustainability of the built environment are suggested.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Hafiz A. Alaka, Lukumon O. Oyedele, Hakeem A. Owolabi, Muhammad Bilal, Saheed O. Ajayi and Olugbenga O. Akinade

This study explored use of big data analytics (BDA) to analyse data of a large number of construction firms to develop a construction business failure prediction model…

Abstract

This study explored use of big data analytics (BDA) to analyse data of a large number of construction firms to develop a construction business failure prediction model (CB-FPM). Careful analysis of literature revealed financial ratios as the best form of variable for this problem. Because of MapReduce’s unsuitability for iteration problems involved in developing CB-FPMs, various BDA initiatives for iteration problems were identified. A BDA framework for developing CB-FPM was proposed. It was validated by using 150,000 datacells of 30,000 construction firms, artificial neural network, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Apache Spark and the R software. The BDA CB-FPM was developed in eight seconds while the same process without BDA was aborted after nine hours without success. This shows the issue of not wanting to use large dataset to develop CB-FPM due to tedious duration is resolvable by applying BDA technique. The BDA CB-FPM largely outperformed an ordinary CB-FPM developed with a dataset of 200 construction firms, proving that use of larger sample size with the aid of BDA, leads to better performing CB-FPMs. The high financial and social cost associated with misclassifications (i.e. model error) thus makes adoption of BDA CB-FPMs very important for, among others, financiers, clients and policy makers.

Details

Applied Computing and Informatics, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-1964

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Juan Manuel Davila Delgado and Lukumon O. Oyedele

The purpose of this paper is to review and provide recommendations to extend the current open standard data models for describing monitoring systems and circular economy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and provide recommendations to extend the current open standard data models for describing monitoring systems and circular economy precepts for built assets. Open standard data models enable robust and efficient data exchange which underpins the successful implementation of a circular economy. One of the largest opportunities to reduce the total life cycle cost of a built asset is to use the building information modelling (BIM) approach during the operational phase because it represents the largest share of the entire cost. BIM models that represent the actual conditions and performance of the constructed assets can boost the benefits of the installed monitoring systems and reduce maintenance and operational costs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a horizontal investigation of current BIM data models and their use for describing circular economy principles and performance monitoring of built assets. Based on the investigation, an extension to the industry foundation classes (IFC) specification, recommendations and guidelines are presented which enable to describe circular economy principles and asset monitoring using IFC.

Findings

Current open BIM data models are not sufficiently mature yet. This limits the interoperability of the BIM approach and the implementation of circular economy principles. An overarching approach to extend the current standards is necessary, which considers aspects related to not only modelling the monitoring system but also data management and analysis.

Originality/value

To the authors’ best knowledge, this is the first study that identifies requirements for data model standards in the context current linear economic model of making, using and disposing is growing unsustainably far beyond the finite limits of planet of a circular economy. The results of this study set the basis for the extension of current standards required to apply the circular economy precepts.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2017

John P. Spillane and Lukumon O. Oyedele

The purpose of this paper is to identify best practice relating to the effective management of materials in an urban, confined construction site, using structural equation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify best practice relating to the effective management of materials in an urban, confined construction site, using structural equation modelling.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review, case study analysis and questionnaire survey are used, with the results scrutinised using confirmatory factor analysis in the form of structural equation modelling.

Findings

The following are the leading strategies in the management of materials in a confined urban site environment: consult and review the project programme, effective communication and delivery, implement site safety management plans and proactive spatial monitoring and control.

Research limitations/implication

With the relentless expansion of urban centres and the increasing high cost of materials, any potential savings made on-site would translate into significant monetary concessions on completion of a project.

Originality/value

As on-site project management professionals successfully identify and implement the various strategies in the management of plant and materials on a confined urban site, successful resource management in this restrictive environment is attainable.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Oladimeji A. Olawale, Lukumon O. Oyedele and Hakeem A. Owolabi

The purpose of this study is to commence the discourse on the non-inclusiveness of the dynamics of reputation within the construction industry by identifying and examining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to commence the discourse on the non-inclusiveness of the dynamics of reputation within the construction industry by identifying and examining the key product and process drivers of reputation in mega-construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected through an exploratory sequential mixed methods approach which commences with a qualitative study and culminates with a quantitative study to identify product and process drivers of reputation in mega-construction projects.

Findings

The findings suggest that “project quality”, “robust social and environmental sustainability plan”, “project team competence and interpersonal relationship” and “project process efficacy” are the four key drivers influencing the reputation of mega-construction projects.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study are solely based on the perception of UK construction practitioners; therefore, the results may only be considered valid in this context. The identification of these key drivers provides a pathway where stakeholders, professionals and organisations can identify and prioritise critical issues associated with enhancing and sustaining the reputation of mega-construction projects.

Originality/value

Findings of this research make a significant contribution to the discourse on the concept of reputation within the construction industry by identifying its specific drivers of reputation.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Saheed O Ajayi, Lukumon O. Oyedele, Kabir O Kadiri, Olugbenga O Akinade, Muhammad Bilal, Hakeem A Owolabi and Hafiz A Alaka

Competency-based measure is increasingly evident as an effective approach to tailoring training and development for organisational change and development. With design…

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1149

Abstract

Purpose

Competency-based measure is increasingly evident as an effective approach to tailoring training and development for organisational change and development. With design stage widely reckoned as being decisive for construction waste minimisation, the purpose of this paper is to identify designers’ competencies for designing out waste.

Design/methodology/approach

Due to paucity of research into competency for construction waste mitigation, this study corroborates verbal protocol analyses (VPA) with phenomenological research.

Findings

Combining findings from the two methodological approaches, competencies for designing out waste are grouped into five categories, three of which are largely task related and two being contextual competencies. The study suggests that design task proficiency, low waste design skills and construction-related knowledge are indispensable task competencies, while behavioural competence and inter-professional collaborative abilities are requisite contextual competencies for designing out waste. In concurrence with task-contextual theory of job performance, personality variables and cognitive abilities are found to influence one another. This suggests that both task and contextual competencies are not only important, they are less mutually exclusive with respect to designing out waste.

Practical implications

This study implies that apart from commitment and dedication of designers to waste minimisation, design and firm practices are expected to be adapted to the industry’s standard.

Originality/value

Basis for training needs of design professionals as well as redeployment criterion are further elaborated in the paper. By enhancing competencies identified in this study, construction waste would not only be significantly designed out, adequate cost saving could be made as a result of waste reduction.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Saheed O. Ajayi, Lukumon O. Oyedele, Babatunde Jaiyeoba, Kabir Kadiri and Sunday Aderemi David

There have been speculations as to whether environmental friendly buildings are always healthy. Using lifecycle assessment (LCA) methodology, the purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

There have been speculations as to whether environmental friendly buildings are always healthy. Using lifecycle assessment (LCA) methodology, the purpose of this paper is to investigate lifecycle relationship between building sustainability and its environmental health impacts

Design/methodology/approach

In order to achieve this, a block of classroom was modelled with the aid of Revit software, and its lifecycle global warming potential (GWP) and human health impacts were analysed using green building studio and ATHENA impact estimator tools. Sensitivity analyses of the block of classrooms were then carried out by varying the building materials and energy use pattern of the original typology. The LCA was performed for seven alternative typologies that were achieved through variation in the building materials and energy use patterns.

Findings

For all the eight building typologies, the study shows a direct relationship between GWPs and human health impacts. This confirms that the more sustainable a building, the less its tendency for having negative health effects on building operatives, occupants and the wider environment. Again, the more green a building in terms of its materials and energy use pattern, the healthier the building becomes.

Research limitations/implications

The human health impacts was evaluated by measuring amount of particulate matter (PM2.5) produced by the buildings while environmental impact was evaluated by measuring global warming (KgCO2) potentials of the buildings throughout its lifecycle. The study has been based on the impacts of building materials and energy use patterns over the entire lifecycle of the buildings and materials used for construction.

Originality/value

The study established a positive relationship between GWP of building and its human health impacts. Thus, all arguments relating to the relationship between building sustainability and health are laid to rest by the paper.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Lukumon O. Oyedele, Martin Regan, Jason von Meding, Ashraf Ahmed, Obas John Ebohon and Amira Elnokaly

The UK construction industry produces up to one third of all waste to landfill. This study aims to identify specific project practices impeding the reduction of waste in…

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1347

Abstract

Purpose

The UK construction industry produces up to one third of all waste to landfill. This study aims to identify specific project practices impeding the reduction of waste in construction projects as well as uncovering potential waste solutions throughout the project delivery process. The rationale being that for such a drastic reduction in waste to landfill, holistic and extensive measures would be required.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐way methodological approach was used. This comprised qualitative unstructured interviews and a quantitative questionnaire survey of three major stakeholders in the UK construction industry: clients, architects and contractors.

Findings

Design factors remain the major cause of impediments to waste reduction to landfill. Critical impediments include clients making waste prevention a top priority in projects, overly complex designs, waste taking a low priority compared to project time and costs, lack of concerns by designers for buildability, among others. Critical solutions include early supply chain involvement in design process, choosing materials for their durability, early communication of design changes to all parties, longer project programmes and better lead times, among others.

Practical implications

In all, the target of halving construction waste to landfill based on the 2008 benchmark is achievable but would require construction companies to take it upon themselves to implement the proposed solutions suggested by this study.

Originality/value

The value of this research is to provide UK construction companies with solutions to reduce waste and aid the reaching of the landfill target, as landfill is decreasing as a solution to waste. In addition the cost savings on reducing waste could be crucial for companies in this current economic climate.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Lukumon O. Oyedele

The overall intent of this research is to identify critical factors influencing architects' and design engineers' (AE) motivational level in design firms.

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3178

Abstract

Purpose

The overall intent of this research is to identify critical factors influencing architects' and design engineers' (AE) motivational level in design firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Motivational theories from the literature on organizational behaviour were examined to identify possible attributes influencing motivation. These attributes were put together in a questionnaire survey of architects and engineers in Northern Ireland design practices. Using factor analysis and regression modelling, four critical factors were identified. The model was validated to determine how well the factors can predict the AE motivational level.

Findings

The results show that the four factors are favourable project working condition, organisational support, design process efficacy and effort recognition.

Practical implications

Design firms and their managers play an important role in ensuring that their designers are motivated in completing their project.

Originality/value

Owners and managers of design firms can use the identified factors to improve the motivation of their architects and design engineers, thus developing a quality workforce.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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