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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Eunji Häne and Lukas Windlinger

A tendency that employees do not frequently switch between different activity settings was reported in previous studies, which are opposed to underlying assumptions of…

Abstract

Purpose

A tendency that employees do not frequently switch between different activity settings was reported in previous studies, which are opposed to underlying assumptions of activity-based working (ABW) offices. Although ABW is increasingly becoming a standard office concept, employees’ switching behaviour has not been studied in depth. This study aims to understand employees’ switching behaviour by identifying reasons (not) to switch and various influencing factors of switching behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted across Switzerland and Belgium, and 124 respondents participated in the questionnaire. The mismatch model was developed to examine whether the misfit between either activity or preference and work environment leads to switching to another place in the office.

Findings

Results show that most of the respondents switch multiple times a day, which runs counter to the previous studies. Furthermore, this study presented clear evidence that mandatory switching frequency is independent of various factors presented in the study, indicating that the distinction between mandatory and voluntary switching is valid. Besides, results identified privacy, acoustics, distraction, proximity to team/colleagues as reasons to switch and as reasons not to switch, place preference/attachment, proximity to the team were determined.

Originality/value

This study contributed to better understanding switching behaviour by defining, distinguishing switching behaviour, identifying reasons (not) to switch and influencing factors of switching frequency. In addition, this study compared the misfit between activity and environment and the misfit between preference and environment as push factors leading to switching behaviour. These findings can provide more knowledge of switching behaviour to workplace or facility management practitioners.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Lukas Windlinger, Susanne Hofer, Christian Coenen, Franziska Honegger, Daniel von Felten, Andrea Kofler and Thomas Wehrmüller

This paper aims to review FM research in Switzerland with a focus on recent research projects at the Institute of Facility Management of the Zurich University of Applied…

852

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review FM research in Switzerland with a focus on recent research projects at the Institute of Facility Management of the Zurich University of Applied Sciences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a summary and review of research projects.

Findings

FM research in Switzerland has grown in the past few years and is now well rooted in the Swiss FM industry. The focus is on service management, workplace management and FM in health care. FM research in Switzerland has been driven collaboratively by the Institute of FM and the industry.

Research limitations/implications

Research at the IFM is very much oriented towards application and many collaborative projects between industry, public administration and universities have been conducted. However, some fields of FM have received little attention yet.

Practical implications

FM research in Switzerland has been driven collaboratively by the Institute of FM and the industry. The focus is on application, e.g. management tools, benchmarking systems or the relationship of FM services, organisational outcomes, and customer satisfaction. Many research results contribute to the development of Swiss FM industry.

Originality/value

In this article the authors summarize FM research in Switzerland and their research approach. With this they contribute to transparency and further development of FM research.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Lukas Windlinger, Suvi Nenonen and Kaisa Airo

Building on fundamental work on usability of workplaces, this paper aims to extend the perspective of usability as an approach in delivering workplace solutions. To…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on fundamental work on usability of workplaces, this paper aims to extend the perspective of usability as an approach in delivering workplace solutions. To explore the content and implications of usability, the concept is differentiated into two sub-concepts: usefulness and user-friendliness.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical rationale for the proposed conceptual specification is presented and explored using data from two independent research projects: a qualitative interview study in an office relocation project in Finland and a quantitative survey study of 1,420 office users of 43 buildings in Switzerland. The goal of the empirical research is to capture the elements of user experience connected to usability using the distinction between usefulness and user-friendliness.

Findings

The results from both studies show that perceived support of work activities by workspaces in relation to work tasks is the main element of usefulness. User-friendliness incorporates comfort and control as the two most important aspects. Correlations between usefulness and user-friendliness and outcomes of usable workspace design are low for self-assessed performance, moderate for job satisfaction and high for work area satisfaction.

Practical implications

Providing useful workplaces supports users’ job performance while designing for user-friendliness is correlated with user satisfaction.

Originality/value

The differentiation of usefulness and user-friendliness of office environments provides a new way to describe user experience. The integration of qualitative and quantitative research strategies strengthens the research evidence.

Details

Facilities, vol. 34 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Annika Feige, Holger Wallbaum, Marcel Janser and Lukas Windlinger

The purpose of this paper is to research the impact of sustainable office buildings on occupant's comfort and self‐assessed performance and work engagement.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to research the impact of sustainable office buildings on occupant's comfort and self‐assessed performance and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The research consists in an empirical study of 18 office buildings and is based on survey data from almost 1,500 employees.

Findings

The study shows that the building itself has a clear impact on the comfort level of the building user. Also, the positive impact of certain features, such as operable windows and the absence of air conditioning, can be clearly identified. While productivity is not directly correlated to comfort levels, work engagement is. Generally, the analysis shows that specific building aspects seem to have an influence on user comfort and with that, also an impact on productivity; however, this impact appears to be limited.

Originality/value

This is a very important insight since this shows the connection between employee and company and thus demonstrates that a high user comfort can reduce the turnover rate of employees. Therefore, additional planning towards user comfort and social sustainability can be shown to yield real returns.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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