Search results

1 – 10 of 14
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Radu Dimitriu, Luk Warlop and Bendik Meling Samuelsen

The purpose of this paper is to show that high similarity between a parent brand and an extension category can have a detrimental effect on how a brand extension is…

Downloads
1287

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that high similarity between a parent brand and an extension category can have a detrimental effect on how a brand extension is perceived to perform on specific attributes. This happens because similarity influences the perceived positioning of a brand extension: lower similarity extensions can be perceived as “specialized” products, whereas high similarity extensions are perceived as “all-in-one” products not performing exceptionally well on any specific attribute.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test the hypothesized effect through three experimental studies. The authors manipulate similarity both within subjects (Study 1a) and between subjects (Study 1b and Study 2). Further, the authors test the effect for specific attributes that are physical/concrete in nature (Study 1a and Study 1b) as well as attributes that are abstract/imagery-related in nature (Study 2).

Findings

High compared to low similarity improves perceptions of overall performance (i.e. performance across all attributes). But as expected, the authors also find that a high similarity brand extension is perceived to perform worse on the attribute on which a low similarity brand extension specializes, even when the parent brands of the extensions possess that attribute to the same extent. This perception of attribute performance carries on to influence brand extension purchase likelihood.

Practical implications

The degree of brand extension similarity has consequences for how brand extensions are perceived to be positioned in the marketplace. Although high similarity extensions receive positive evaluations, they might not be suitable when a company is trying to instil a perception of exceptional performance on a specific attribute.

Originality/value

The authors demonstrate a consequential exception to the marketing wisdom that brands should extend to similar categories. Although the degree of brand extension similarity has been repeatedly shown to have a positive effect on brand extension evaluation, the authors document a case when its effect is actually detrimental. This study’s focus on the dependent variable of perceived performance on specific attributes is novel in the brand extension literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Sebastiaan Morssinkhof, Marc Wouters and Luk Warlop

This article addresses purchasing decisions and the use of total cost of ownership (TCO) information. TCO is based on a monetary quantification of nonfinancial attributes…

Abstract

This article addresses purchasing decisions and the use of total cost of ownership (TCO) information. TCO is based on a monetary quantification of nonfinancial attributes and aggregation into a summary measure (such as cost per hour, per wafer, or per kilometer). From an accounting point-of-view, one intricate issue is the accuracy of the monetary quantification and how this affects decision-making. We distinguish three different kinds of inaccurate monetary quantification, and we investigate the weight that decision makers attach to attributes that are inaccurately monetarily quantified and subsequently included in TCO information. Specifically, we investigate whether this weight depends on reflective thinking and experience. This question is relevant beyond TCO, for all decision-making situations that involve monetary quantification of attributes and subsequent aggregation, such as in activity-based costing, net present value calculations for capital budgeting decisions, or cost-benefit analyses in public administration.

We found support for the hypothesis that reflective thinking increases the weight decision makers attach to the attribute that is included as a minimum cost in the TCO-numbers, but not for the hypothesis that reflective thinking would reduce the weight attached to the attribute that is included as a maximum cost in the TCO-numbers. Students and practitioners differed significantly in the weight they attached to an attribute that was excluded from the TCO-numbers, and practitioners gave less weight to such attributes. Together these results suggest that TCO-numbers should be provided with care and possible inaccuracies should be clarified.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-267-8

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Abstract

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-267-8

Abstract

Details

Leading with Presence: Fundamental Tools and Insights for Impactful, Engaging Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-599-3

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Eric Van Steenburg

The paper aims to determine the effectiveness of specific online advertisements, comparing banner ads that are brand‐reinforcing versus ones that are product‐reinforcing.

Downloads
4248

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to determine the effectiveness of specific online advertisements, comparing banner ads that are brand‐reinforcing versus ones that are product‐reinforcing.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses three experimental design studies to empirically test the hypotheses based on the elaboration likelihood model (ELM) by manipulating type of online banner advertisement (brand‐type versus product‐type) and measuring individual need for cognition (NFC).

Findings

Consumers high in NFC recall product‐type banner ads more readily than those low in NFC, while brand‐type banner ads are more likely to be recalled by low‐NFC consumers. However, high‐NFC consumers recall brand‐type ads under all situational influences tested. And while consumers low in NFC recall product‐type banner ads featuring a directive better than their high‐NFC counterparts, they do not recall directive ads at a greater rate than high‐NFC consumers recall brand‐type ads.

Research limitations/implications

While previous research has found that variations in ad size, color, interactivity, and web site location affect recall, this research only measured static banner ads that appear at the top of the page. However, because it is the first to examine involvement in terms of NFC in combination with brand‐ and product‐type ads, the research sheds new light on consumer awareness of two types of banner ad strategies adopted by marketing managers today.

Practical implications

In an online context, the type of banner ads used by marketing managers should be paired with the web site based on how much time consumers spend at the site and how many pages they click through at the site. All things being equal, however, managers should favor brand‐type banner ads over product‐type banner ads.

Originality/value

The research extends understanding of ELM as it relates to type of banner ad while establishing a potential research stream for better understanding of how consumers process various types of online ads. At the same time, it provides new evidence that can help marketing managers make better strategic decisions regarding their online marketing mix.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Enrique Manzur, Rodrigo Uribe, Pedro Hidalgo, Sergio Olavarrieta and Pablo Farías

The purpose of this study is to test the viability of comparative advertising in Chile.

Downloads
2382

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the viability of comparative advertising in Chile.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via controlled experimentation. The study employed a 3 (comparative advertising intensity: noncomparative, indirect comparative, and direct comparative)×2 (product category involvement: low, high)×2 (sponsor brand's relative market share: market leader, other brand) between‐subjects factorial design.

Findings

The results suggest that direct and indirect comparative advertisements are not more effective than noncomparative advertisements in Chile. Additionally, data do not support the idea that the effect of comparative advertising intensity is moderated by the product category involvement and/or by the sponsor brand's relative market share. Since comparative advertising was not shown to be more effective than noncomparative advertising, the authors hypothesize that it is due to cultural biases and the novelty of comparative advertising in Latin America, as expressed through negative message believability.

Practical implications

While experimental research is not sufficient to establish the generalized non‐superiority of comparative advertising in the region, the results support the idea that comparative advertising might not be more effective than noncomparative advertising for many marketing campaigns in Latin America.

Originality/value

Several recent studies have investigated international differences in advertising practices. Most of these address advertising in general, leaving the transferability of comparative advertising practices largely unexplored (White Nye et al.). Analyzing the case of Latin America is highly relevant due to the limited development that exists with respect to comparative advertising in the region.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2017

Majid Mohammad Shafiee and Sayyed Mohammad Sadiq Es-Haghi

This study was carried out to identify mall image dimensions, analyse and discuss how shopping well-being is influenced by mall image and impacts on mall loyalty with the…

Downloads
1473

Abstract

Purpose

This study was carried out to identify mall image dimensions, analyse and discuss how shopping well-being is influenced by mall image and impacts on mall loyalty with the moderating role of gender differences. Besides, the relationship between hedonic value (HV) and utilitarian value (UV) on shopping well-being are investigated. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a questionnaire, data were obtained from shoppers at the biggest and the most remarkable malls in Tehran that has a high level of brand awareness. A two-stage method of structural equation modelling was used for testing the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that shopping well-being is affected by mall image and HV but not by UV. In addition, as indicated in previous researches, this study supports the idea that shopping well-being influences mall loyalty. In other words, it is argued that shopping well-being is more about pleasure and fun than doing task-oriented activities.

Originality/value

Most of the mall image dimensions overlapped each other, therefore the purpose of this research is to choose and introduce the best and the most comprehensive combination of those dimensions. Also, in spite of the recent emergence of the shopping well-being concept, it has proved to be delicate in the Iranian context through value, consumer well-being, consumption experiences and sociological life space theories in the quantitative method. In addition, this study shows that shopping well-being is a subjective well-being. This is in contrast to what the common Islamic philosophers opine. Additionally, not only did it propose how to make shoppers more loyal through shopping well-being, but it also discussed the role of gender difference on the subject of shopper loyalty phenomenon. More importantly, this study enables other researchers to investigate cultural differences in this region and make it possible to compare Middle Eastern Countries, especially Iran, to other countries.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of 14