Search results

1 – 10 of 333
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2018

Susana Caxaj and Luis Diaz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of belonging and wellbeing among temporary migrant agricultural workers (TMAWs) in a rural setting in the interior…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of belonging and wellbeing among temporary migrant agricultural workers (TMAWs) in a rural setting in the interior of British Columbia, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative narrative approach informed by participatory action research principles was employed. In total, 12 migrant workers participated in two to four one-on-one interviews and/or focus group conversations.

Findings

The analysis revealed an over-arching theme of Marginal Living encompassing stories of always on the outside, mechanisms of isolation and exclusion; struggling for the basics, realities of worrying about daily bare necessities; and “nothing but a worker’s,” experiences of being reduced only to one’s labor. These storied experiences each impacted workers’ wellbeing and typically limited their ability to feel a sense of belonging. Yet, workers exerted agency and resilience through storied experiences of “one family and for those who come next.” Their efforts contributed to building a sense of community through mutual support and advocacy.

Originality/value

Very few studies have focused on the day-to-day experiences of this population and its influence on their sense of belonging and wellbeing. This study is also the first to examine this topic within this particular region (the rural BC interior). These findings can provide a starting point for improved program planning to address challenges faced by TMAWs in rural Western Canada. Further, they expand the understanding of concepts such as partial citizenship and structural exclusion as they apply in the day-to-day realities of migrant workers in rural BC.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Marta Luz Arango-Uribe, Carlos Javier Barrera-Causil, Vladimir Pallares, Jessica Maria Rojas, Luís Roberto Mercado Díaz, Rebecca Marrone and Fernando Marmolejo-Ramos

The concept of sustainable development (SD) is a popular response to society’s need to preserve and extend the life span of natural resources. One of the 17 goals of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of sustainable development (SD) is a popular response to society’s need to preserve and extend the life span of natural resources. One of the 17 goals of the SD is “education quality” (Fourth Goal of Sustainable Development [SDG-4]). Education quality is an important goal because education is a powerful force that can influence social policies and social change. The SDG-4 must be measured in different contexts, and the tools to quantify its effects require exploration. So, this study aims to propose a statistical model to measure the impact of higher education online courses on SD and a structural equation model (SEM) to find constructs or factors that help us explain a sustainability benefits rate. These proposed models integrate the three areas of sustainability: social, economic and environmental.

Design/methodology/approach

A beta regression model suggests features that include the academic and economic opportunities offered by the institution, the involvement in research activities and the quality of the online courses. A structural equation modelling (SEM) analysis allowed selecting the key variables and constructs that are strongly linked to the SD.

Findings

One of the key findings showed that the benefit provided by online courses in terms of SD is 62.99% higher than that of offline courses in aspects such as transportation, photocopies, printouts, books, food, clothing, enrolment fees and connectivity.

Research limitations/implications

The SEM model needs large sample sizes to have consistent estimations. Thus, despite the obtained estimations in the proposed SEM model being reliable, the authors consider that a limitation of this study was the required time to collect data corresponding to the estimated sample size.

Originality/value

This study proposes two novel and different ways to estimate the sustainability benefits rate focused on SDG-4, and machine learning tools are implemented to validate and gain robustness in the estimations of the beta model. Additionally, the SEM model allows us to identify new constructs associated with SDG-4.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Executive summary
Publication date: 1 December 2015

VENEZUELA: Diaz arrests will not ease tensions

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES207012

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Anabel Renteria, Luisa F. Garcia, Jorge A. Diaz, Luis C. Delfin, Jaime E. Regis, Elizabeth I. Reza, David Espalin, Tzu-Liang Bill Tseng and Yirong Lin

The purpose of this study is to evaluate different 3D structures for humidity sensing that will enable the fabrication of complex geometries with high moisture sensitivity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate different 3D structures for humidity sensing that will enable the fabrication of complex geometries with high moisture sensitivity.

Design/methodology/approach

Humidity sensors based on alumina ceramics were fabricated using direct ink write (DIW) technique. Different engineered surface area, polymer binder ratio and post-processing treatment were considered to increase moisture sensitivity.

Findings

It was found that the binder ratio plays an important role in controlling the rheology of the paste during printing and determining the pore size after post-processing treatment. The sensibility of the fabricated humidity sensor was investigated by measuring its capacitance response toward relative humidity (RH) varying from 40% to 90% RH at 25°C. It is shown that using 3D lattice design, printed alumina humidity sensor could improve sensitivity up to 31.6 pF/RH%, over an order of magnitude higher than solid alumina.

Originality/value

Most of the alumina humidity sensors available are films in nature because of manufacturing difficulties, which limited its potential of higher sensitivity, and thus broader applications. In this paper, a novel 3D alumina humidity sensor was fabricated using DIW 3D printing technology.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Peter Buxmann, Anette von Ahsen and Luis Martín Díaz

The purpose of this research is to examine economic approaches to evaluate different cooperation scenarios in the context of Supply Chain Management.

1236

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine economic approaches to evaluate different cooperation scenarios in the context of Supply Chain Management.

Design/methodology/approach

The value of different cooperative scenarios is analyzed in the fields of procurement and distribution planning using an analytical approach as well as simulation runs.

Findings

On the basis of the framework of Wyner and Malone coordination mechanism in the field of Supply Chain Management was examined. Using an analytical approach as well as simulation runs it can be shown that the centralized coordination scenarios usually lead to superior results compared with different decentralized approaches in the field of procurement planning and distribution planning.

Originality/value

Empirical data show that the difficulty in quantifying cooperation benefits is the main reason for not to implementing inter‐organizational software solutions such as Supply Chain Management software. Therefore, a prototype is developed to quantify the value of cooperation in the fields of procurement planning and distribution planning.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Luis Diaz-Serrano

The purpose of this paper is to seek test for the precondition for labour-market competition between immigrants and natives, which implies that both are willing to accept…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek test for the precondition for labour-market competition between immigrants and natives, which implies that both are willing to accept jobs that do not differ in quality.

Design/methodology/approach

To test this hypothesis, using Spanish data, the paper analyses whether immigrants and natives exhibit different tastes for working conditions. The paper proceeds as follows. First, the paper estimates job satisfaction equations, where working conditions enter as covariates. Second, the paper tests whether the package of (dis)amenities inherent to their jobs differ. Additionally, the paper also tests for assimilation of immigrant workers in terms of job quality.

Findings

The paper finds that immigrant and native workers tend to exhibit the same taste for most on-the-job amenities. However, immigrants are more tolerant with jobs involving poorer environmental working conditions, more physically demanding tasks and higher exposure to physical damage. The paper also finds that immigrant workers tend to be employed in lower quality jobs. However, some of the bad working conditions tend to improve over time, suggesting some assimilation in terms of job quality.

Originality/value

The type of analysis the authors carry out here allows them to contribute to the literature by moving a step away from the conventional approach used in previous studies. While previous literature mostly analyses the effect of immigration in natives’ labour market outcomes and assimilation of immigrants in terms of wages and employment, this study is one of the few that focus on working conditions and the quality of jobs.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

L. Maldonado, Omán Quiroz‐Zavala and Luis Díaz‐Ballote

The purpose of this paper is to elucidate if there is a loss in bond strength between galvanized steel used as reinforcement, and concrete of water‐to‐cement (w/c) ratio…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elucidate if there is a loss in bond strength between galvanized steel used as reinforcement, and concrete of water‐to‐cement (w/c) ratio of 0.4 and 0.5, after both types of sample were cured for seven, 21 and 28 days in saturated calcium hydroxide solution, and without curing. The air permeability of the concrete was investigated at the interfacial zone.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural low‐carbon steel and galvanized steel were embedded in concrete samples, prepared with Portland cement type I and limestone (calcite 94‐97 percent) aggregates. The bond strength between the concrete and the reinforcing bars was measured by means of pull‐out tests.

Findings

In concrete of w/c=0.4 the bond for galvanized steel was 5.4±0.5 MPa, while the bond for black steel was 5.8±0.5 MPa, which is 7 percent higher than bond strength measured for samples with galvanized steel rebars. The bond strength for galvanized steel in concrete with a w/c ratio 0.5 was 5.5±0.6 MPa, which was 9 percent higher than the values obtained for black steel, which was 5.0±1 MPa. The total average bond strength of galvanized steel in concrete of w/c ratio 0.4 (5.4±0.5 MPa) and w/c ratio 0.5 (5.5±0.6 MPa) was very similar. They differed by only 2 percent. No decrease in the air permeability at the interfacial zone concrete/galvanized steel was found due to curing.

Originality/value

This research gives quantitative data on the behavior of galvanized steel used as reinforcing bars in concrete, prepared with limestone aggregates. The results might help to increase the reliability of galvanized reinforcing steel used in infrastructure exposed to very aggressive tropical humid marine environments.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 57 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

Executive summary
Publication date: 26 November 2015

VENEZUELA: Campaign killing raises new risks

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES206938

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2011

Joop Hartog

We survey the literature on the Risk Augmented Mincer equation that seeks to estimate the compensation for uncertainty in the future wage to be earned after completing an…

Abstract

We survey the literature on the Risk Augmented Mincer equation that seeks to estimate the compensation for uncertainty in the future wage to be earned after completing an education. There is wide empirical support for the predicted positive effect of wage variance and the negative effect of wage skew. We discuss robustness of the findings across specifications, potential bias from unobserved heterogeneity and selectivity and consider the core issue of students' information on benefits from education.

Details

Research in Labor Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-333-0

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 2 September 2022

There are currently seven bills in both chambers of Congress on this issue.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB272475

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
1 – 10 of 333