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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2021

Anne-Cathrin Hoppe-Herfurth, Birgit Burkhardt, Nancy John and Ludwig Bilz

Teachers are exposed to many stressors. Compared to other occupational groups, they are more frequently affected by psychosomatic complaints. In recent decades, numerous…

Abstract

Purpose

Teachers are exposed to many stressors. Compared to other occupational groups, they are more frequently affected by psychosomatic complaints. In recent decades, numerous prevention and intervention measures for promoting health have been developed and implemented for this target group. However, it remains unclear how the uptake of health-promotion measures (HPMs) by teachers can be increased in order to prevent stress-related disorders. This paper examines two facets of health literacy—health awareness and health value—in terms of their importance in both the take-up and intended take-up of HPMs.

Design/methodology/approach

In the 2017/2018 school year, data were collected by paper and pencil from a representative sample of 830 teachers across all school types in the German State of Brandenburg.

Findings

Teachers who place great value on their own health show significantly higher levels of take-up and intended take-up of HPMs. The findings regarding health awareness are more heterogeneous. Further associations were found with age and psychosocial stress.

Originality/value

While there has been growing academic interest in developing HPMs for teachers, there has been relatively little focus on the factors that may influence the implementation and uptake of these measures. The paper contributes to addressing this gap by shedding light on the relevance of two facets of health literacy. Strengthening the perceived importance of health could be a starting point for increasing the use of HPMs by teachers and thus improving their health.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 1 April 2024

Christopher E. Weilage and Patricia Kraft

This case was developed from a primary source and is based on interviews and personal evaluations.

Abstract

Research methodology

This case was developed from a primary source and is based on interviews and personal evaluations.

Case overview/synopsis

Maria was at a scheduled lunch with her direct manager, John, who inquired about the privacy leak regarding employee data she had found a few months earlier. Upon discovering the issue, Maria took on the task of ensuring the privacy leak was dealt with and resolved. John knew it was a challenging interdepartmental task because other managers did not immediately recognize the seriousness and full impact of the issue on employee privacy. Plus, the belief was that the project to combine two software programs improving CRM functionality, causing the employee data leak, needed immediate release. During the lunch, Maria stated that the privacy problem was fully eliminated and that, in the end, it did impact a lot more than only a few employees. John actively encouraged Maria in the conversation to seek feedback from Richard, the managing director directly involved and responsible for the project, which Maria had already done. When the feedback arrived, Maria felt extremely hurt by the comments and began to question the validity of the company’s values. Now, she must decide what her options are.

This case study is about dealing with feedback, career development and how to receive and provide feedback. It presents a situation that allows for a variety of ways to address negative feedback and shows that different reactions can have broader consequences for career development. At the same time, the case illustrates how feedback is given in international teams and companies, and how intercultural or gender-relevant circumstances may have to be considered.

Complexity academic level

This case study was written for use in BA and MA classes to promote discussion regarding feedback. Relevant courses in business and administration or an international business study program could be organizational behavior, communication training, conflict management, an intercultural competencies course or in line with career management sequences.

Early program BA students, BA students in advanced semesters as well as MA students with work experience are all markets for the case. It has been class-tested with BA international business students. While advanced BA and graduate students are able to and expected to enrich discussions by contributing personal stories, early program BA students benefit from learning how to create feedback and how to read feedback – including from other students, instructors and managers, to use during their first internships.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

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