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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Stéphane Renaud and Lucie Morin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of three training indicators, namely offer, participation and cost, on three firm outcomes, namely voluntary turnover…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of three training indicators, namely offer, participation and cost, on three firm outcomes, namely voluntary turnover, firm performance and profit.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis is carried out using firm-level data sourced from a Canadian national data set. In total, data from 5,237 for-profits firms with ten employees or more were analyzed longitudinally over eight years. Results were generated by XTREG fixed effect longitudinal analyses between the three variables of training, voluntary turnover, firm performance and profit.

Findings

Training offer, operationalized as the number of different formal training programs offered annually by an employer, significantly decreases voluntary turnover while it significantly increases performance and profit. Training participation, operationalized as the percentage of employees receiving training per year, has a significant positive impact on voluntary turnover. Training cost, operationalized as the annual cost of training per employee, has no impact on the three firm outcomes.

Practical implications

Among the various human resource practices a firm can use to strengthen its human capital, training can have a significant impact of its own. Investing in a diversified training offer brings value to a firm by decreasing employee voluntary turnover while increasing firm performance and profit.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the strategic impact of organizational training, demonstrating the impact of training on key organizational outcomes over time. Further, this paper contributes to the empirical literature by making a distinction between voluntary and involuntary turnover. Last, even though this study does not entirely addresses the problem of possible reverse causality, using longitudinal objective data, this study addresses several limits of past research at the macro-level of analysis.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Stéphane Renaud, Lucie Morin and Anne Marie Fray

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of two instrumental organizational attributes (innovative perks and training) and one symbolic organizational…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of two instrumental organizational attributes (innovative perks and training) and one symbolic organizational attribute (ethics) on applicant attraction.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of business undergraduates in their final year (n=339) and a policy-capturing approach, the authors tested a 2 (absence/presence of innovative perks) ×2 (few/many training opportunities) ×2 (ethics is not very important/is important) quasi-experimental design using ANCOVA.

Findings

In regard to main effects, results show that all attributes have a significant effect on applicant attraction, the “ethics” organizational attribute having the strongest direct effect followed by “training” and then “innovative perks.” In regard to all interaction effects, findings are only significant for two two-way interaction effects: “innovative perks×training” and “innovative perks×ethics.” Specifically, results indicate that offering innovative perks only had a positive and significant effect on applicant attraction when: a firm offered few training opportunities and ethics was important for the firm.

Originality/value

This study compared three key organizational attributes where most studies only tested one. Understanding which organizational attributes have the greatest influence on potential candidates’ attraction can help organizations optimize recruiting. The results suggest that developing an organizational brand that focuses particularly on ethics and training constitutes a winning recruitment strategy. This experiment is the first to provide causal conclusions on the relationship between innovative perks and attraction.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Louis Baron, Lucie Morin and Denis Morin

Despite its growing popularity in applied settings, executive coaching has to date received little attention in empirical research, especially in regard to the coaching…

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Abstract

Purpose

Despite its growing popularity in applied settings, executive coaching has to date received little attention in empirical research, especially in regard to the coaching process. This paper aims to investigate the effect of working alliance rating discrepancies on the development of coachees' self‐efficacy, a key outcome in leadership development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on a pre‐ post‐test study of a leadership development program taking place in a large North American manufacturing company. Data were collected from two samples: managers receiving coaching over an eight‐month period and internal certified coaches. In total, 30 coach‐coachee dyads were analyzed.

Findings

Results from an analysis of covariance did not support the authors' hypothesis, by indicating that coachees having worked with a coach who underestimated the working alliance, in relation to his or her coachee, experienced more growth in self‐efficacy than coachees who worked with a coach who either accurately estimated or overestimated the working alliance.

Practical implications

The results sugges that coaches should coach with an “ongoing and deliberately maintained doubt as their only certainty”. The importance for coaches to be sensitive to signs of what the coachee is experiencing, and to take the initiative to verify the coachee's comfort level with the way coaching is proceeding is addressed.

Originality/value

This study intended to delve deeper into the complexities of the coaching process by linking a key coaching process variable, the relationship, to coaching outcomes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Stéphane Renaud, Lucie Morin, Jean-Yves Saulquin and Jocelyne Abraham

The purpose of this paper is to answer the following two questions: What are the HRM practices that have a significant impact on employees’ functional retention?, and Does…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the following two questions: What are the HRM practices that have a significant impact on employees’ functional retention?, and Does the impact of these HRM practices on functional retention differ based on the employee’s status as an expert or a non-expert? Our theoretical foundation rests on human capital theory and social exchange theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses longitudinal data that come from multiple surveys conducted on new employees within a Canadian subsidiary of an international information technology (IT) firm.

Findings

Results show that four out of five HRM practices under study have a significant and positive impact on functional retention of employees regardless of their expert status: satisfaction with a respectful and stimulating work environment, satisfaction with training and development, satisfaction with innovative benefits and satisfaction with incentive compensation significantly increase functional retention of employees. Functional retention was found to be higher for experts than for their non-expert counterparts. Last, results show that expert/non-expert status play a moderating role between HRM practices and functional retention.

Originality/value

In short, this study offers five main contributions to the literature: first, it focuses on retention rather than turnover; second, it goes further by examining functional retention as the dependant variable; third, it distinguishes between two categories of employees: experts and non-experts; fourth, it extends the limited literature on IT workers, HRM practices and retention; and fifth, it is based on longitudinal data whereas the overwhelming majority of published studies have been based on cross-sectional data.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Stéphane Renaud, Lucie Morin and Julie Cloutier

This study seeks to investigate whether gender and managerial status act as significant correlates of participation in voluntary training.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to investigate whether gender and managerial status act as significant correlates of participation in voluntary training.

Design/methodology/approach

This theoretical foundation rests on human capital and systemic discrimination theories. Data come from the computerized records of a bank's employees.

Findings

Results show that both gender and managerial status have a differential impact on participation in voluntary training: women participate more than men and managers' participation is higher than non‐managers' participation. Also, individual characteristics and productivity‐related variables impact differently on participation by gender and managerial status.

Originality/value

The results showed that the probability of participating in voluntary training varies according to gender and managerial status. This probability is explained in particular by the differential effect produced by the individuals' productivity‐related characteristics (age, schooling, organizational tenure and part‐time status) according to gender and managerial status.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2010

Louis Baron and Lucie Morin

Executive coaching has become an increasingly common method to skill development. However, few rigorous empirical studies have tested its capacity to generate outcomes…

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Abstract

Purpose

Executive coaching has become an increasingly common method to skill development. However, few rigorous empirical studies have tested its capacity to generate outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the links between executive coaching and self‐efficacy in regard to supervisory coaching behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on a pretest‐posttest study of a leadership development program using three training methods: classroom seminars, action learning groups, and executive coaching. Data are collected in a large international manufacturing company from 73 first‐ and second‐level managers over an eight‐month period.

Findings

Results indicate that, after controlling for pre‐training self‐efficacy and other training methods, the number of coaching sessions has a positive and significant relationship with post‐training self‐efficacy. Results also show that utility judgment, affective organizational commitment, and work‐environment support have each a positive and significant relationship with post‐training self‐efficacy.

Practical implications

The paper first suggests that an organization that wishes to improve its return on investment with regard to coaching should implement a program with multiple sessions spread over a period of several months. This paper also suggests that organizations should consider coaching from a systemic point of view, that is, taking into account not only the design but also individual and situational variables.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the scientific literature by investigating, with a solid methodological design, the capacity of executive coaching to increase self‐efficacy related to management skills.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

453

Abstract

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

For many undergraduates about to be unleashed onto the world of employment, one would imagine they will have fairly standard ideas of the kind of employer they would like to work for: one that pays its staff well, one that will invest in their careers, and one that will offer some fringe benefits as well. Indeed, prospective employers will put the metaphorical red carpet out when recruiting, either by hiring fancy hotels for the initial interview rounds, or by showing potential employees around the very best bits of their offices.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Nathalie Fabbe-Costes, Lucie Lechaptois and Martin Spring

To empirically examine the usefulness and value of supply chain mapping (SC mapping), which has been neglected despite its importance in research and practice.

Abstract

Purpose

To empirically examine the usefulness and value of supply chain mapping (SC mapping), which has been neglected despite its importance in research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on three combined theoretical perspectives, we conducted a case study on a car manufacturer's managers mapping their downstream supply chain (SC). We conducted semi-structured interviews and a mapping exercise with them, followed by a focus group.

Findings

We find differences between individual and corporate SC maps and between how managers define the outbound SC, the SC map they draw and what they say when mapping. The three theoretical perspectives allow us to enrich SC mapping thinking. We focus on boundary objects to formulate propositions. SC mapping and maps are discussed with respect to contemporary SCs and SCM.

Research limitations/implications

Based on a single case study on one firm's outbound SC. Research could be expanded to the company's external partners and follow the development and use of maps in real time.

Practical implications

Highlights the usefulness and difficulties of SC mapping, for individuals and organisations. For the company, it opens avenues for further development and use of SC mapping to improve inter-functional and inter-organisational collaboration.

Social implications

Confirms the need for SC mapping competences in SCM and consequently the usefulness of teaching SC mapping courses in logistics and SCM programs.

Originality/value

Highlights the usefulness of SC mapping and rekindles interest in SC mapping and maps in SCM. Introduces boundary objects into SCM research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Réjean Hébert, Anne Veil, Michel Raîche, Marie‐France Dubois, Nicole Dubuc and Michel Tousignant

PRISMA is the only example of a co‐ordinated‐type model to be developed and fully implemented with a process and outcome evaluation. The PRISMA model was implemented in…

Abstract

PRISMA is the only example of a co‐ordinated‐type model to be developed and fully implemented with a process and outcome evaluation. The PRISMA model was implemented in three areas (urban, rural with or without a local hospital) in Quebec, Canada and an implementation evaluation was carried out using mixed (qualitative and quantitative) methods. Over four years, the implementation rates went from 22% to 79%. The perception of integration by managers and clinicians working in the various organisations of the network shows that most interactions are perceived as at the co‐operation level, some getting the highest collaboration level. The perception of the efficacy of case managers was very high. Implementing such a model is feasible, and the decision to generalise it was made in Quebec. This model might be more appropriate for a universal publicly funded health care system like those in Canada, the UK and the Scandinavian countries.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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