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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2021

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Modeling Economic Growth in Contemporary Hong Kong
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-937-3

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Lerzan Aksoy, Linda Alkire (née Nasr), Jay Kandampully, Laura Kemppainen, Lu Kong and Laura E. McClelland

The purpose of this study is to highlight the role that service firms can play to improve societal health and create symbiotic value, defined as value created as a result…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to highlight the role that service firms can play to improve societal health and create symbiotic value, defined as value created as a result of collaborative relationships between the firm, its employees, customers and the communities in which it operates.

Design/methodology/approach

This manuscript examines the case of Millennials as they make up a dominant portion of the current workforce in society and proposes a conceptual framework for symbiotic value creation.

Findings

This study identifies the need to develop supporting mechanisms for the growing role of Millennials as employees and members of society that ultimately, in turn, create symbiotic value.

Originality/value

The paper proposes an integrative framework beyond the traditional and siloed examination of linkages between employee, customer, firm and society, creating new opportunities for extending a service theory and practice.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Ceridwyn King, Enrique Murillo, Wei Wei, Juan Madera, Michael J. Tews, Aviad A. Israeli and Lu Kong

The purpose of this paper is to start a conversation on achieving a shared understanding among hospitality service co-creation participants. Adopting a stakeholder and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to start a conversation on achieving a shared understanding among hospitality service co-creation participants. Adopting a stakeholder and service eco-systems approach, attention is drawn to the necessity for all service experience participants to have a shared understanding of the service experience and their role within it, for a sustained competitive advantage to be realized. Informed by community of practice (CoP) thinking, a road map of research questions is advanced encouraging insight into a macro level phenomenon that, traditionally, is only ever considered at the micro service encounter level.

Design/methodology/approach

A thorough multidisciplinary review of the literature was undertaken, providing an opportunity to present a viewpoint on the strategic implications of providing a sustainable competitive advantage via the hospitality service experience.

Findings

To achieve a shared understanding across the Hospitality Service Experience Eco-System, potential tensions among stakeholders are highlighted. Accounting for such barriers, institutional arrangements, combining organizational CoPs that are bridged by designated boundary objects, is advanced. Given the novel approach of applying a traditionally organizational phenomenon at a macro multi-stakeholder level, several research questions are proposed to inform thinking about this neglected perspective.

Originality/value

Acknowledging the innovation, agility and resources required to maintain a competitive service experience, the paper emphasizes the importance of adopting a macro perspective to effective service management. The hope is to stimulate academic interest to inform understanding as to how to build this capability as well as enhance practitioner interest in promoting stakeholders’ CoP for the benefit of the entire Hospitality Service Experience Eco-System.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Shaobing Tang, Jiafang Lu and Philip Hallinger

Like other nations in Asia, mainland China has undergone continuous reforms in its economic, political and social institutions over the past two decades. These changes are…

Abstract

Purpose

Like other nations in Asia, mainland China has undergone continuous reforms in its economic, political and social institutions over the past two decades. These changes are also reflected in its education system, which has been both the target of government reforms and an agent for social change. In this context, China's Ministry of Education has cast school principals as key actors in leading and managing change in schools at the local level throughout the country. The purpose of this paper is to explore how Chinese school leaders successfully respond to the implementation of educational reform.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper the authors explore how school leaders in one city in South China perceive their roles and actions in fostering successful change. The study employed extensive literature review with qualitative interviews of five school principals who had demonstrated success at leading change in their schools.

Findings

The findings of both the literature review and interview study unexpectedly found more similarities than differences between how leaders contribute to successful change in China as compared with the Western literature.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings are limited by two main features. First, the sources analyzed in the literature review were of highly varying quality. Moreover, relatively few employed replicable analytical methods capable of generalization. These limitations of the literature mean that the results of the review can only be interpreted as suggestive rather than conclusive. Second, the interview study was framed as an effort to further explore the trends of the literature review. Although the findings from the small-scale interview study were consistent with the broader Chinese literature, the research design suffers form the same limitations as the general literature. Therefore, these findings must also be treated as emergent rather than explanatory.

Practical implications

The paper identifies directions for future research and discusses implications for school leaders in implementing educational change in China.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in its attempt to synthesize a previously inaccessible literature on change leadership in Chinese schools. Despite China's rising role as a global leader, the literature in educational leadership and management remains sparse and largely unknown to Western scholars. Therefore, the study's limitations are balanced by the need to provide better descriptions of current practices employed by leaders as they attempt to improve China's schools.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2015

Binqing Zhai and Albert P.C. Chan

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between community participation and community evaluation of heritage revitalisation projects in the context of Hong Kong

Abstract

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between community participation and community evaluation of heritage revitalisation projects in the context of Hong Kong. In 2007, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region government introduced a Revitalisation Scheme to conserve and revitalise government-owned historic buildings. Nevertheless, since the announcement of the Revitalisation Scheme, whether the concerned revitalisation projects could benefit the local community, as publicized in the multiple objectives of the scheme by the government, has become a very contentious issue. This issue seriously affects the communities’ attitudes and opinions on the Revitalisation Scheme. This paper will address this issue from the perspective of community participation in heritage revitalisation projects. Based on a recently completed revitalisation project under the Revitalisation Scheme, this paper asserts that there is a positive correlation between community participation and community evaluation of the project’s social impact.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Oi‐ling Siu, Luo Lu and Cary L. Cooper

This study investigated occupational stress in managers in Hong Kong and Taiwan using the Occupational Stress Indicator‐2 (OSI‐2). The results showed the reliabilities and…

Abstract

This study investigated occupational stress in managers in Hong Kong and Taiwan using the Occupational Stress Indicator‐2 (OSI‐2). The results showed the reliabilities and predictive validity of the OSI‐2 subscales were reasonably high in both samples. The logical relationships between job satisfaction, mental and physical well‐being found in the two samples have provided support to findings obtained in Western countries. Moreover, the direct impacts of coping strategies, Type A behaviour and locus of control on job strains also corroborated previous studies in Western societies. Further, there were gender differences in managerial stress in Hong Kong: female managers scored higher in sources of stress and quitting intention; but had lower job satisfaction, worse mental and physical well‐being than male managers. These differences could not be found in Taiwanese managers, yet Taiwanese female managers did report more stress related to the “managerial role” than their male counterparts.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Paula Kwan and Allan Walker

The topic of organizational culture has attracted the attention of numerous researchers from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives. A review of the literature…

Abstract

The topic of organizational culture has attracted the attention of numerous researchers from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives. A review of the literature shows that the quantitative assessment of organizational culture has been dominated by studies adopting the competing values framework developed by Quinn and his colleagues. The use of this model embraces the notion that the 4 cultural types depicted by the framework can be used not only to represent the culture of an organization but also to serve as a basis upon which one organization can be differentiated from others. Various attempts have been reported to support the validity of the framework for describing the culture of an organization; however, the claim that one organization can be differentiated from another on the basis of the 4 cultural types is yet to be empirically supported. The study reported here set out to show that the competing values model can be used to differentiate organizations from one another. Based on a survey administered to all academic staff in 7 out of the 8 government‐funded higher education institutions in Hong Kong, the study successfully confirmed the validity of the competing values model as a tool in differentiating organizations.

Details

Organizational Analysis, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1551-7470

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Peter Lok

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a neo-liberal nationalist discourse of China imagines the spatial identity of the post-1997 Hong Kong with reference to Lost in

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a neo-liberal nationalist discourse of China imagines the spatial identity of the post-1997 Hong Kong with reference to Lost in Hong Kong, a new Chinese middle-class film in 2015 with successful box office sales.

Design/methodology/approach

Textual analysis with the aid of psychoanalysis, postcolonial studies and semiotics is used to interpret the meaning of the film in this study. The study also utilizes the previous literature reviews about the formation of the Chinese national identity to help analyze the distinct identity of the Chinese middle class today.

Findings

The discussion pinpoints how the new Chinese middle class as neo-liberal nationalists take Hong Kong as a “bizarre national redemptive space”. While Hong Kong is cinematically constructed as such a national other, this paper argues that the Hong Kong in question stands not for itself but in a form of “reverse hallucination” for pacifying the new Chinese middle class’ trauma under the rapid neo-liberalization of China in the 1990s.

Originality/value

This paper shows the new of formation of the Chinese nationalist’s discourse, especially the new Chinese middle-class discourse on Hong Kong after 1997.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Ka‐ho Mok

This paper sets out in the wider context of globalization to examine how and what specific reform strategies the Government of the Hong Kong special administrative region…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out in the wider context of globalization to examine how and what specific reform strategies the Government of the Hong Kong special administrative region (HKSAR) has adopted in reforming its higher education system to enhance the competitiveness of its higher education in the increasingly globalizing economic context. More specifically, this paper has chosen a focus to examine how, and in what way universities in Hong Kong have attempted to make themselves internationally competitive, and what systems have been introduced to assure quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a case study approach in examining recent higher education changes/reforms in Hong Kong. Using literature survey, documentary and policy analysis, intensive interviews, as well as field observations, the paper has provided a comprehensive review and a critical analysis of higher education governance in Hong Kong.

Findings

This paper has reviewed major higher education reforms in the HKSAR, with particular reference to examine how higher education institutions have changed the ways that they are governed and managed. Academics working in Hong Kong nowadays are confronted with increasing pressures from the government to engage in international research, commanding a high quality of teaching and contributing to professional and community services. As Hong Kong universities have tried to benchmark with top universities in the world, they are struggling very hard to compete for limited resources. “Doing more with less” and “doing things smarter” are becoming fashionable guiding principles in university management and governance. Internal competition in the university sector is inevitably becoming keener and intensified.

Research limitations/implications

The paper discusses the case study of Hong Kong which reflects how a rapidly developed economies in East Asia have attempted to tackle the growing impact of globalization on higher education governance.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive picture of how the universities in Hong Kong have responded to increasingly intensified quality assurance pressures, and fills an identified information gap on specific strategies in promoting the international competitiveness of universities in the city‐state in East Asia.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Allan Walker and Terrence Quong

This chapter targets the learning of middle leaders working in the rapidly expanding international school sector in the Asia-Pacific Region. It draws on three externally…

Abstract

This chapter targets the learning of middle leaders working in the rapidly expanding international school sector in the Asia-Pacific Region. It draws on three externally commissioned impact studies of Leading Upstream (LU) – a purpose-designed 12-month part-time, leader learning program. The program runs in Hong Kong for middle leaders from 20 primary and secondary schools that make up a semigovernment education system. The main aim of the program was to scale up individual, team, and school capacity through a structured learning network design. Since 2005/2006, the program has completed four cohorts. The authors present an analysis of the impact of a connected series of the same program to draw insights that may inform program development for middle leaders. The heart of the chapter focuses on the authors’ attempts to synthesize the outcomes of the three impact studies. Data patterns from across the studies were analyzed to identify common patterns. Patterns determined were divided into personal, team/school, and system impact. Among the former is ‘increased confidence in self as leader” and the later the fragility of even moderately broad networks when learning hits the realities of school.

Details

Global Perspectives on Educational Leadership Reform: The Development and Preparation of Leaders of Learning and Learners of Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-445-1

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