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1 – 10 of over 3000
Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Chunzeng Fan and Taoyuan Wei

Constructing a low-carbon agriculture (LCA) park is considered an effective means to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in developing countries. This study aims to…

1916

Abstract

Purpose

Constructing a low-carbon agriculture (LCA) park is considered an effective means to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in developing countries. This study aims to explore the effectiveness of integrated low-carbon agricultural technologies based on evidence from a pilot LCA experiment in Shanghai, China, from 2008 to 2011.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrated low-carbon technologies in an agricultural park were adopted to reduce GHG emissions. Reduced emissions and net economic benefits were calculated by comparing emissions before and after the implementation of the experiment.

Findings

Results show that the low-carbon agricultural park experiment markedly reduced GHG emissions. This outcome can be attributed to the integrated technologies adopted in the experiment, including the reuse and recycle of resources, control of environmental pollution and GHG emissions and improvement of economic efficiency and social benefit. All the technologies adopted are already available and mature, thus indicating the great potential of LCA to reduce GHG emissions despite the lack of advanced technologies. However, supporting policies may be necessary to motivate private interests in LCA because of the considerable starting investments.

Originality/value

Previous macro-level and policy studies on LCA are based on knowledge from experimental studies, which typically specify environmental conditions to explore solely the effects of one low-carbon technology. Practically, integrating several low-carbon technologies in one experiment may be more effective, particularly for extensive agriculture, in developing countries. The effectiveness of integrated technologies is insufficiently discussed in the literature. Therefore, this study explores how effective integrated feasible LCA technologies can be in terms of both emission reduction and economic benefits based on the data obtained from an experiment in Shanghai, China.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Björn Budde

The issue of climate change raises new requirements for the way our societies work. Even though climate policy is regarded as being crucial on the way to a low carbon

1031

Abstract

Purpose

The issue of climate change raises new requirements for the way our societies work. Even though climate policy is regarded as being crucial on the way to a low carbon society, the coordination of technology and climate policy proves difficult. The purpose of this paper is to look closer into the challenges and experiences related to the coordination between climate and technology policy in order to draw lessons for the future integration of both policy fields.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper a case study approach is applied to the policy coordination efforts in two countries: Denmark and the UK. From a theoretical point the study is informed by the literature on the dimensions of policy learning and the findings of innovation and transition studies.

Findings

The case studies provide important lessons how important flexibility and continues policy learning and its institutionalization will be on the way towards a low carbon society. However, it becomes clear that the price of this flexibility is the risk of “symbolic action”, respectively, postponing emission reduction measures.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are drawn from two countries, however it remains not fully clear in how far the instruments and approaches from countries like Denmark and the UK can be applied in a similar way in other countries.

Originality/value

The paper provides an important discussion of contradictions between climate and technology policy from the perspective of the literature in innovation studies and policy learning.

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

A.M. Forster, S. Fernie, K. Carter, P. Walker and D. Thomson

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the risks of building defects associated with rapid advancement of “green” construction technologies. It identifies the methods…

2962

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the risks of building defects associated with rapid advancement of “green” construction technologies. It identifies the methods adopted by the sector for the determination of pre-construction defects that are framed within the context of, traditional; scientific; and professional design approaches. These are critically evaluated and utilised in attempts to mitigate defects arising from diffusing low carbon construction innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an evaluative literature review. Polemic in orientation, the paper critically compares two periods of time associated with rapid advancement of innovation. The first, the post-Second World War housing boom is synonymous with a legacy of substandard buildings that in many cases rapidly deteriorated, requiring refurbishment or demolition shortly after construction. The second, is today’s “green” technology “shift” with its inherent uncertainty and increased risk of latent building defects and potential failure to deliver meaningful long-term performance. Central to this is an exploration of the drivers for innovation, and subsequent response, precautionary measures initiated, and the limitations of institutionalised systems to identify and mitigate defects. Similarities and differences between these historical periods frame a discussion around the theoretical approaches to defects and how these may be limited in contemporary low carbon construction. A conceptual framework is presented with the aim of enhancing the understanding for obviation of defects.

Findings

Sufficient commonality exists between the periods to initiate a heightened vigilance in the identification, evaluation and ideally the obviation of defects. Design evaluation is not expressly or sufficiently defect focused. It appears that limited real change in the ability to identify defects has occurred since the post-war period and the ability to predict the performance of innovative systems and materials is therefore questionable. Attempts to appraise defects are still embedded in the three principle approaches: traditional; scientific; and professional design. Each of these systems have positive characteristics and address defect mitigation within constrains imposed by their very nature. However, they all fail to address the full spectrum of conditions and design and constructional complexities that lead to defects. The positive characteristics of each system need to be recognised and brought together in an holistic system that offers tangible advantages. Additionally, independent design professionals insufficiently emphasise the importance of defect identification and holistic evaluation of problems in design failure are influenced by their professional training and education. A silo-based mentality with fragmentation of professional responsibility debases the efficacy of defect identification, and failure to work in a meaningful, collaborative cross professional manner hinders the defect eradication process.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst forming a meaningful contribution to stimulate debate, further investigation is required to tangibly establish integrated approaches to identify and obviate defects.

Practical implications

The structured discussion and conclusions highlight areas of concern for industry practitioners, policy makers, regulators, industry researchers and academic researchers alike in addressing and realising a low carbon construction future. The lessons learned are not limited to a UK context and they have relevance internationally, particularly where rapid and significant growth is coupled with a need for carbon reduction and sustainable development such as the emerging economies in China, Brazil and India.

Social implications

The carbon cost associated with addressing the consequences of emerging defects over time significantly jeopardises attempts to meet legally binding sustainability targets. This is a relatively new dimension and compounds the traditional economic and societal impacts of building failure. Clearly, blindly accepting this as “the cost of innovation without development” cannot be countenanced.

Originality/value

Much research has been undertaken to evaluate post-construction defects. The protocols and inherent complexities associated with the determination of pre-construction defects have to date been largely neglected. This work attempts to rectify this situation.

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

David Tyfield and Jun Jin

This paper seeks to explore arguments for the importance of disruptive innovation to China's low‐carbon transition, while such innovation is generally overlooked and/or belittled.

3797

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore arguments for the importance of disruptive innovation to China's low‐carbon transition, while such innovation is generally overlooked and/or belittled.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on the multi‐level perspective (MLP) of systems transitions being developed by interdisciplinary scholars regarding low‐carbon innovation to explore the multiple opportunities regarding disruptive innovation in the case of China.

Findings

This exploration details that at the levels of business strategy, national economic development and governance of a transition to ecological sustainability, there is a strong prima facie case that disruptive innovation offers singular opportunities in China regarding low‐carbon innovation, while a focus on hi‐tech innovation alone is unlikely to effect the radical systems transition needed.

Practical implications

Acknowledging and incorporating such opportunities is thus to be encouraged, both in China and elsewhere, including in the formulation of low‐carbon innovation policy. A concerted research programme for ongoing and iterative “second‐order” learning about concrete examples of disruptive low‐carbon innovation is advocated.

Social implications

The increased opportunities for dispersed social involvement in a low‐carbon transition through disruptive innovation are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper offers a novel synthesis of diverse literatures to advocate a significantly different approach to low‐carbon innovation than is evidenced in current policy and policy discourse.

Details

Journal of Knowledge-based Innovation in China, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1418

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Yongjing Wang, Qingxin Lan, Feng Jiang and Chaofan Chen

As the contradiction between economic development, resource and environment has become increasingly prominent, low-carbon competitiveness has received worldwide focus…

1038

Abstract

Purpose

As the contradiction between economic development, resource and environment has become increasingly prominent, low-carbon competitiveness has received worldwide focus. This study aims to examine low-carbon competitiveness in 31 provinces (cities and regions) of China.

Design/methodology/approach

An evaluation index system for low-carbon competitiveness in China has been constructed, which is composed of 25 economic, social, environmental and policy indicators. To study the state of low-carbon competitiveness and resistance to China’ development of low-carbon competitiveness, this study uses a combination of the catastrophe progression model, the spatial autocorrelation model and the barrier method.

Findings

China’ low-carbon competitiveness gradually decreases from coastal to inland areas: the Tibet and Ningxia Hui autonomous regions are the least competitive regions, while the Shandong and Jiangsu provinces are the most competitive areas. The spatial correlation of the 31 provinces’ low-carbon competitiveness is very low and lacks regional cooperation. This study finds that the proportion of a region’ wetland area, the proportion of tertiary industries represented in its GDP and afforestation areas are the main factors in the development of low-carbon competitiveness. China should become the leader of carbon competitiveness by playing the leading role in the Eastern Region, optimizing the industrial structure, improving government supervision and strengthening environmental protection.

Originality/value

The paper provides a quantitative reference for evaluating China’ low-carbon competitiveness, which is beneficial for environmental policymaking. In addition, the evaluation and analysis methods offer relevant implications for developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Charikleia Karakosta, Haris Doukas and John Psarras

Sustainable development (SD) in developing countries is mentioned as one of the main aims of the Kyoto protocol's clean development mechanism. However, in the present…

1821

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable development (SD) in developing countries is mentioned as one of the main aims of the Kyoto protocol's clean development mechanism. However, in the present context, uncertainty prevails to whether the (CDM) is actually procuring its aims in terms of achieving SD and to what extent. Chile, which has an open market economy, could risk becoming “locked” into a carbon intensive future, due to the recently discovered coal reserves and plans of large utilities to move to coal technology and not necessarily clean‐coal technology. The aim of this paper is to assist Chile in finding ways of encouraging technology transfer of energy technologies that would contribute to a low‐carbon sustainable energy development.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to be able to identify potential CDM projects facilitating SD in developing countries, through technology transfer from developed ones and, thus, to formulate a series of possible investment strategies with a SD component, it is crucial to establish a clear understanding of the host country's needs and priorities and the suitable energy technologies to meet these needs.

Findings

This paper presents results obtained from an elaborated stakeholders' assessment on Chile's high priority energy needs, sustainable energy technologies fulfilling these needs and opportunities and barriers related with the implementation of these technologies in the particular market.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful results that could facilitate Chile's designated national authority as well as future project investors to put on the map the most suitable sustainable energy technologies, based on the country's SD needs and priorities, to transfer and implement via CDM. The above is particularly important for Chile since recent coal discoveries could risk becoming “locked” into a carbon intensive future.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2013

Wang Hong

The chapter explores the corporate risks and opportunities in low carbon economy in order to provide references for business to tackle the global warming issue. It first…

Abstract

The chapter explores the corporate risks and opportunities in low carbon economy in order to provide references for business to tackle the global warming issue. It first discusses severe consequence of climate change and points out that the low carbon economy is to mitigate climate change. Then different perspectives of low carbon economy and similar connotations are introduced. It is found that companies are driven to practise environmental responsibility by various risks. In particular, these risks come from international policies, investors, national regulations, customers, peers, sub-sectors, and supply chains. Finally, the opportunities and benefits of low carbon responsibility are illustrated. The research shows that if the enterprises actively take low carbon responsibility, they will get the opportunities to develop corporate capabilities, benefits of early movement and advantages of brand effect.

Details

The Governance of Risk
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-781-8

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2021

Chunhui Liu and Huawei Zheng

Low-carbon agricultural technology (LAT) extension is a key strategy for the agricultural sector to address climate change. Social capital, which consists of social…

Abstract

Purpose

Low-carbon agricultural technology (LAT) extension is a key strategy for the agricultural sector to address climate change. Social capital, which consists of social networks, trust and norms, can play an active LAT extension role. This paper aims to analyze the mechanism of the role of social capital in the process of LAT extension.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire data from six counties in Jiangsu, China, were used to measure social capital and analyze its effect on LAT extension using logistic regression. Data from 27 interviews were used to analyze the LAT extension experiences and problems.

Findings

LAT is mainly deployed by the government to farmers and distributed among them. In this process, the village officials who form parts of the government’s composition and the villagers play a dual role that facilitates a close link between them and the farmers and ensures LAT integration. However, social norms did not play a significant role in the process.

Practical implications

Farmers’ acceptance of LAT is based solely on the trade-off between local networks’ benefits and trust in local villagers and village officials. LAT-related laws and technical measures, thus are essential to strengthen LAT practices’ authority and incorporate LAT-based agricultural production as the norm of production behavior.

Originality/value

This paper provides an insight into the process and essence of farmers’ acceptance of LAT, which provides theoretical lessons for the LAT extension in China and indeed other developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2022

Hongman Liu, Shibin Wen and Zhuang Wang

Agricultural carbon productivity considers the dual goals of “agricultural economic growth” and “carbon emission reduction”. Improving agricultural carbon productivity is…

Abstract

Purpose

Agricultural carbon productivity considers the dual goals of “agricultural economic growth” and “carbon emission reduction”. Improving agricultural carbon productivity is a requirement for promoting green and low-carbon development of agriculture. Agricultural production agglomeration is widespread worldwide, but the relationship between agricultural production agglomeration and agricultural carbon productivity is inconclusive. This paper aims to study the impact of agricultural production agglomeration on agricultural carbon productivity, which is conducive to a better understanding of the relationships among agglomeration, agricultural economic development and carbon emission, better planning of agricultural layout to build a modern agricultural industrial system and achieve the goal of carbon peaking and carbon neutrality.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on China's provincial data from 1991 to 2019, this paper uses non-radial directional distance function (NDDF) and Metafrontier Malmquist–Luenberger (MML) productivity index to measure total factor agricultural carbon productivity. Subsequently, using a panel two-way fixed effect model to study the effect and mechanism of agricultural production agglomeration on agricultural carbon productivity, and the two-stage least squares method (IV-2SLS) is used to solve endogeneity. Finally, this paper formulates a moderating effect model from the perspective of the efficiency of agricultural material capital inputs.

Findings

The empirical results identify that Chinese provincial agricultural carbon productivity has an overall growth trend and agricultural technological progress is the major source of growth. There is an inverted U-shaped relationship between agricultural production agglomeration and agricultural carbon productivity. The input efficiency of agricultural film, machine and water resources have moderating effects on the inverted U-shaped relationship. Agricultural production agglomeration also promotes agricultural carbon productivity by inhibiting agricultural carbon emissions in addition to affecting agricultural input factors and its internal mechanisms are agricultural green technology progress and rural human capital improvement.

Originality/value

This paper innovatively adopts the NDDF–MML method to measure the total factor agricultural carbon productivity more scientifically and accurately and solves the problems of ignoring group heterogeneity and the shortcomings of traditional productivity measurement in previous studies. This paper also explains the inverted U-shaped relationship between agricultural production agglomeration and agricultural carbon productivity theoretically and empirically. Furthermore, from the perspective of agricultural material capital input efficiency, this paper discusses the moderating effect of input efficiency of fertilizers, pesticides, agricultural film, agricultural machines and water resources on agricultural production agglomeration affecting agricultural carbon productivity and answers the mechanism of carbon emission reduction of agricultural production agglomeration.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Jun Guo, Xi Zhao and Yimin Huang

The purpose of this paper is to establish a grey clustering evaluation model based on center-point triangular whitenization weight function to evaluate the situation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a grey clustering evaluation model based on center-point triangular whitenization weight function to evaluate the situation of urban low-carbon transport development (LTD). The study results intend to provide some theoretical basis and tool support for transport management departments and related researchers who are engaged in low-carbon transport (LT).

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses analytical hierarchy process based on expert investigations to determine the weight of each criteria, classifies the grey clusters based on center-point triangular whitenization weight function, calculates the membership of each development criteria and ranks the development level of all dimensions.

Findings

The research results of case city show that low-carbon technology is in “poor” level, transport facility is in “superior” level, low-carbon policy and environmental coordination is in “intermediate” level, transport management is in “good” level and the overall LTD level is in “intermediate” level.

Practical implications

Reducing the carbon emissions of urban transport and achieving LT is the key to promote urban sustainable development, the scientific judgment of transport development situation is the premise of promoting LTD. Therefore, based on the practices of LT in China, the study systematically clarifies LTD from five dimensions of reflecting LTD.

Originality/value

From the perspective of sustainable development, the evaluation index system of LTD is built with five dimensions consisting of low-carbon technology, low-carbon policy, transport facility, transport management and environmental coordination. Then assess the LTD by using the grey clustering evaluation model based on center-point triangular whitenization weight. This paper presents a new research idea for LTD evaluation.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

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