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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Victor Pozzobon and Clément Pozzobon

Cottage is a protein-rich food which is commonly consumed by people targeting weight reduction and athletes willing to eat whole-food instead of protein supplements. Yet…

Abstract

Purpose

Cottage is a protein-rich food which is commonly consumed by people targeting weight reduction and athletes willing to eat whole-food instead of protein supplements. Yet out of common knowledge, the scientific community lacks solid evidences of the effect of the inclusion of cottage cheese in a diet. The purpose of this paper is to assess the evidences from scientific literature of the impact of inclusion of cottage cheese in a diet.

Design/methodology/approach

PubMed and Web of Science were searched for scientific literature dealing with “cottage cheese” and “diet.” There was no restriction regarding the type article type, date nor journal it is published in. References found to during the analysis of the articles extracted from database were also included. Studies search, screening and eligibility analysis were led in parallel by two independent reviewers.

Findings

This survey shows that cottage cheese is a good source of calcium (with 83 mg/100 g) – but not low fat cottage cheese because of its low vitamin S content (p < 0.001) –, a source of probiotic (1 serving providing the recommended dietary intake), a source of high quality proteins, reduces postprandial blood glucose level – healthy and type II diabetes subjects – (p < 0.05), is not linked to increased cardiovascular diseases nor cancer risks (p < 0.05).

Originality/value

Based on the findings reported in this review, the inclusion of cottage cheese in a diet can be advised for: women to build up calcium storage to fight osteoporosis; more generally calcium/vitamin D deficient subjects; athletes willing to increase their high-quality proteins intake through whole food consumption; dieters looking for low energy, high protein, high satiety food; untreated type II diabetes patients by reducing postprandial glucose level.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1984

Dilys Wells

Although the recent COMA Report made recommendations that we should be making positive changes in our food consumption, that manufacturers should label their food products…

Abstract

Although the recent COMA Report made recommendations that we should be making positive changes in our food consumption, that manufacturers should label their food products with details of their fat content, and should take steps to market popular foods, such as sausages and beefburgers, with a lower fat content, it is all too easy to doubt whether the message about the need for dietary change is going to filter through to the general public. The COMA Report states that ‘Those responsible for health education should inform the general public of their recommendations and how to implement them’. A recent Channel 4 TV series entitled, Food for Thought, made with Health Education Council backing, hopes to make us ‘more knowledgeable about our eating’, but the programme is screened between 10.30 and 11.20 in the evening. Hardly peak viewing time!

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 84 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Tatsawan Tipvarakarnkoon, Sangrawee Sornsa-ard and Wutcharee Imcha

The purpose of this paper is to develop fresh cheese made from different types of coconut milk (fresh, UHT, and reconstituted coconut milk) mixed with pasteurized cow’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop fresh cheese made from different types of coconut milk (fresh, UHT, and reconstituted coconut milk) mixed with pasteurized cow’s milk (50:50) by rennet coagulation. The main aim of this study was to achieve successful formation of cheese curd with fully coconut milk aroma and flavor.

Design/methodology/approach

Fresh cheese made from different types of coconut milk mixed with cow’s milk (50:50) were developed and compared to fresh cheese made from cow’s milk (100:0). Physicochemical analysis including pH, acidity, percentage of yield, protein and fat content, texture analysis and sensory evaluation has been performed. The nine-point hedonic preference test (n=35) and consumer testing (n=235) were conducted.

Findings

In comparison, fresh cheese made with the presence of coconut milk (50:50) had higher fat content, lower crude protein content, higher firmness, and adhesiveness than those made from cow’s milk alone (0:100). The cheese with the presence of coconut milk was liked better by consumers (7.35 out of 9). Rehydrated coconut milk was mostly preferred to use among all three types of coconut milk which showed firmer texture and admired flavor. The texture of the developed product was proved to be similar to commercial cottage cheese. Using the rehydrated coconut milk in the formulation gave successful results for making fresh coconut milk cheese, which has also not been used previously in any research.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper, the effect of process conditions on the quality of cheese curd formation was not yet investigated and discussed. The process parameters including heat treatment and renneting time should be further studied.

Originality/value

A novel fresh cheese made from coconut milk mixed with pasteurized cow’s milk was successfully developed. The cheese curd was formed with fully coconut milk aroma and flavor.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

C.N. Roussis and C.H. Skiadas

Crete is the largest island of Greece and fifth of theMediterranean basin which produces traditional and high‐quality cheesesfrom sheep′s and goat′s milk. Reports a…

Abstract

Crete is the largest island of Greece and fifth of the Mediterranean basin which produces traditional and high‐quality cheeses from sheep′s and goat′s milk. Reports a qualitative and quantitative market survey to determine which factors affect purchasing behaviour with respect to cheese. Results showed that the Cretan cheeses are much preferred by consumers. Price, convenience (packaged), hygiene and dietary value (low fat) of the cheese are the main determinants of their choice. However these depend on the age, education and economic status of respondents. There was a high degree of desire for low fat and packaged cheese.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Manish Kumar Chatli, Neeraj Gandhi and Parminder Singh

The sensory quality and yield of mozzarella cheese deteriorate as the fat content in milk is reduced. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of sodium alginate as a fat

Abstract

Purpose

The sensory quality and yield of mozzarella cheese deteriorate as the fat content in milk is reduced. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of sodium alginate as a fat replacer in low-fat buffalo mozzarella cheese on the basis of processing and storage (4 ± 1°C) quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Five treatments of buffalo mozzarella cheese, viz., control full-fat cheese (6.0 per cent milk fat; CFFC), control low-fat cheese (<0.5 per cent milk fat) without sodium alginate (CLFC), low-fat cheese with 0.1 per cent sodium alginate (LFC-1), 0.2 per cent sodium alginate (LFC-2) and 0.3 per cent sodium alginate (LFC-3), were comparatively evaluated.

Findings

Increase in the level of sodium alginate increased the percent yield of treated low-fat cheese than CLFC. Addition of sodium alginate to low-fat cheese resulted in decrease in hardness (p = 0.023) and chewiness than CLFC. Meltability was significantly decreased (p = 0.03) in low-fat cheese than CFFC. It was recorded as 1.5 ± 0.14 cm for CFFC to 0.2 ± 0.08 cm in LFC-3. Sensory panellists awarded LFC-3 highest and lowest to LFC-1; however, treated products at all selected levels were superior to CLFC. Oxidative stability and microbial stability were improved in LFC-3 than CFFC during storage.

Practical implications

Results concluded that 0.3 per cent sodium alginate is optimum for the development of extended shelf-life functional/low-fat/low-calorie buffalo mozzarella cheese.

Originality/value

Processing interventions can be successfully used to develop low-fat/low-calorie mozzarella cheese with acceptable sensory attributes and longer storage life.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1986

Susan Hayes and Judy Buttriss

Hard cheeses Cheese has been made in this country for at least 2,000 years. Until the middle of the 19th century, cheese was made on the farm, using the unpasteurised milk…

Abstract

Hard cheeses Cheese has been made in this country for at least 2,000 years. Until the middle of the 19th century, cheese was made on the farm, using the unpasteurised milk from a single herd of cows and very simple equipment. However, due to the amount of cheese consumed in Britain today, 80 per cent is now produced in creameries.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 86 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1974

Few will complain that 1974 has not been an eventful year; in a number of significant respects, it has made history. Local Government and National Health Services…

Abstract

Few will complain that 1974 has not been an eventful year; in a number of significant respects, it has made history. Local Government and National Health Services reorganizations are such events. This is indeed the day of the extra‐large authority, massive monoliths for central administration, metropolitan conurbations for regional control, district councils corresponding to the large authorities of other days; and in a sense, it is not local government any more. As in other fields, the “big batallions” acquire greater collective power than the total sum of the smaller units, can wield it more effectively, even ruthlessly, but rarely appearing to take into account the masses of little people, the quiet people, who cannot make themselves heard. As expected, new names of authorities are replacing the old; new titles for departments and officers, ambitious and high‐sounding; a little grandiose for the tongues of ordinary folk. Another history‐making event of 1974, in the nature of a departmental transfer but highly significant for the course of future events as far as work in the field is concerned, was handing over of the personal health services—health of expectant mothers, babies, children, domiciliary midwifery, the school health services and their mainly medical and nursing personnel—from local health authorities to the newly created area health authorities. The public health departments over fifty years and more had created them, built them up into the highly efficient services they are. If anything can be learned from the past, new authorities are always more expensive than those they replace; they spend freely and are lavish with their accommodation and furnishings. In their first few months of existence, the new bodies have proved they are no exception. News of their meetings and activities in many areas is now scanty; even local newspapers which usually thrive on Council news—or quarrels—seem to have been caught on the wrong foot, especially in the small towns now merged into larger units. The public are relatively uninformed, but this doubtless will soon be rectified.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 76 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1972

First January 1973 will not only mark the beginning of a New Year but a year which history will mark as a truly momentous one, for this is the year that Britain, after…

Abstract

First January 1973 will not only mark the beginning of a New Year but a year which history will mark as a truly momentous one, for this is the year that Britain, after centuries of absence, re‐enters the framework of Europe as one of the Member‐States of the enlarged European Community. This in itself must make for change on both sides; Britain is so different in outlook from the others, something they too realize and see as an acquisition of strength. There have been other and more limited forms of Continental union, mainly of sovereignty and royal descent. Large regions of France were for centuries under the English Crown and long after they were finally lost, the fleur de lis stayed on the royal coat of arms, until the Treaty of Amiens 1802, when Britain retired behind her sea curtain. The other Continental union was, of course, with Hanover; from here the Germanized descendants of the Stuarts on the female line returned to the throne of their ancestors. This union lasted until 1832 when rules of descent prevented a woman from reigning in Hanover. It is interesting to speculate how different history might have been if only the British Crown and the profits of Tudor and Stuart rule had been maintained in one part of central Europe. However, Britain disentangled herself and built up overwhelming sea power against a largely hostile Europe, of which it was never conceived she could ever be a part, but the wheel of chance turns half‐circle and now, this New Year, she enters into and is bound to a European Community by the Treaty of Rome with ties far stronger, the product of new politico‐economic structures evolved from necessity; in a union which cannot fail to change the whole course of history, especially for this country.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 74 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

The old year has gone, leaving its trail of never‐to‐be‐forgotten memories of strife and turbulence, calamity, disaster, and a huge burden of worries for us to face in the…

175

Abstract

The old year has gone, leaving its trail of never‐to‐be‐forgotten memories of strife and turbulence, calamity, disaster, and a huge burden of worries for us to face in the New Year. Few if any will not be deeply grateful to see the passing of 1985. Except for the periods of calm there cannot be a year within living memory to equal it in terms of violence, unparalleled in times of “peace”, collosal in terms of soaring social and public expenditure and financial loss, and in disasters in the world beyond the shores of these islands. It would not be an exaggeration to state that the enormous indebtedness which the year has heaped upon the people will never be wiped off, and it has got to be done mainly by those innocent of any misconduct, and their descendants. The unprecedented scale of street and community violence, the looting, thieving and general crime committed behind the screen of it.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 88 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1930

The case of the prosecution and conviction of a cowkeeper, who was also a milk vendor, in January last for selling milk that showed a deficiency of 25·27 per cent. in fat

Abstract

The case of the prosecution and conviction of a cowkeeper, who was also a milk vendor, in January last for selling milk that showed a deficiency of 25·27 per cent. in fat content is said to have presented such unusual features that no conviction should have followed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

1 – 10 of 199