Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sudhir Ambekar, Anand Prakash and Vishal Singh Patyal

The purpose of this paper is to propose a low carbon culture (LCC) adoption model for gaining the right carbon capabilities by integrating the dimensions of flexibility or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a low carbon culture (LCC) adoption model for gaining the right carbon capabilities by integrating the dimensions of flexibility or control and external or internal of competing values framework (CVF) with that of level of carbon emission (LCE).

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviewed literature related to low carbon supply chain, CVF and carbon capabilities to synthesize currently available frameworks for assessing culture and carbon-related insights. Based on these insights, this study proposes the carbon culture adoption model and presents some research propositions.

Findings

This study has extended categorization of culture suggested in CVF from four categories to eight distinct categories by adding “LCE” as a third dimension. The new categories of carbon culture are: “Red,” “Antagonist,” “Obligatory,” “Early Adopter,” “Follower,” “Transitive,” “Pragmatist” and “Green.” This categorization of organizations would help in selecting appropriate low carbon practices (LCPs).

Research limitations/implications

This study presents purely conceptual framework with some research propositions which needs to be empirically tested.

Practical implications

Organizations can formulate right policies for low carbon capabilities based on the LCC of their supply chain.

Originality/value

With increasing awareness about environment across stakeholders, organizations around the world are under pressure to reduce their carbon footprints. The extent of reduction in carbon footprints depends on the right capabilities across the supply chain which in turn depends on selection of the right combination of LCPs based on the supply chain culture.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Suresh Renukappa, Akintola Akintoye, Charles Egbu and Jack Goulding

The problem of climate change is one aspect of the broader problem of sustainability. Many businesses in most sectors now accept that they must address the issue of…

Abstract

Purpose

The problem of climate change is one aspect of the broader problem of sustainability. Many businesses in most sectors now accept that they must address the issue of climate change in order to survive and grow in ever‐changing entangled business economies. Due to mounting pressure from stakeholders, top executives of many organisations are now implementing various carbon emissions reduction strategies. However, the extent to which businesses embrace climate change and carbon management as an integral pillar of their business models remains unclear and poorly understood. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim of this research is to investigate the key carbon emissions reduction initiatives currently being implemented in the UK industrial sectors so as to improve their competitiveness. In order to achieve this aim, a mixed research methodological approach was adopted to collect and analyse data. Four industry sectors were examined, specifically: energy and utilities, transportation, construction and not‐for‐profit organisations; with specific respect to their environmental, social and economic impact on the UK society.

Findings

The level of implementation of carbon emissions reduction strategies within the UK industrial sectors is fairly “low” and varies significantly across the four sectors; with relatively high uptake in the energy and utilities sector, and low uptake in the construction sector. The level of implementation of change management initiatives to deal with carbon emissions reduction initiatives is also relatively “low”.

Practical implications

This study suggests that carbon emissions reduction strategies are in their infancy. Taken together, the impact of management commitment and leadership, climate change‐related policies, structures, reward systems, training programmes and performance reporting are key factors in successful implementation of low carbon strategies. The paper concludes that there is a need for cross‐sector collaboration to capture and share best and worst practices relating to low carbon strategies.

Originality/value

The paper provides a richer insight into the understanding and awareness of low carbon strategies for competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Vishal Singh Patyal, Sudhir Ambekar, Anand Prakash, Dipayan Roy and Amit Hiray

The present study proposes a model to examine the cultural fit between buyers and suppliers for establishing synergies in their processes and practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The present study proposes a model to examine the cultural fit between buyers and suppliers for establishing synergies in their processes and practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study assessed buyers' culture through the Competing Values Framework and used Quality Management Practices Model as a proxy to assess suppliers' culture. The data from 262 paired respondents were used for this analysis. This survey was administered in India, using linear snowball-sampling technique. This study applied 3SLS regression for each culture group separately.

Findings

This study has instituted the cultural fit between the buyers' and suppliers' culture. It is observed that for getting synergies between cultures, buyers need to choose a set of suppliers which have similar cultural traits.

Research limitations/implications

This study presents empirical findings based on data from Indian manufacturing firms. These findings need testing in other developing countries and other sectors.

Practical implications

Organizations can formulate right policies for supplier selection based on the cultural fit between buyers and suppliers.

Originality/value

With increasing role of suppliers in the value chain, organizations around the world need to work with the right suppliers for gaining a sustainable competitive advantage. Selection of the right suppliers depends on the cultural fit between buyers and suppliers that, in turn, depends on the selection of the right suppliers based on the prevailing culture.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jamal Elbaz and Saadia Iddik

This paper seeks to explore, summarize, and interpret the existing literature linking green supply chain management (GSCM) to culture. To achieve this goal, three main…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore, summarize, and interpret the existing literature linking green supply chain management (GSCM) to culture. To achieve this goal, three main questions are answered: (1) How culture has been linked to GSCM in prior works? (2) What are the general problems exposed? (3) What gaps to detect?

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review related to culture–GSCM was conducted. The review combines descriptive and content analysis of 46 academic peer-reviewed English papers from 30 international journals.

Findings

Around 90 percent of the articles are empirical papers, only 10 percent are conceptual papers. These papers systematically focused on two issues: the largest number deal with the organizational culture–environmental practices, then national culture–environmental practices. The GSCM–culture relationship underlines contrast findings stemmed from various factors, levels of analysis, different sample, research design, contexts, and so on. Among the results, a conceptual model is developed, allowing suggestions for future research.

Research limitations/implications

This review is limited by the environmental practices of SCM raised in the literature, excluding corporate responsibility or ethics researches. This study may not be exhaustive and expose all papers in the field, but it does definitively assess a wider number of papers available and to which access is provided. Future researchers empirically test the conceptual model proposed toward more clarifications.

Practical implications

This paper provides managers with an extra element to take into consideration while accustoming with GSCM, which is better understanding the role and the sensitivity of cultural values in order to harmonize with the changes.

Originality/value

This paper had extended the prior reviews to add recent and new papers. It does not only update the understanding related to culture–GSCM but goes beyond that to propose a multidisciplinary model theorizing the existing links and calling for ultimate investigations for the detected gaps.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Content available
Article

Stephen Todd

Abstract

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Andrew Glover, Yolande Strengers and Tania Lewis

Air travel is becoming increasingly recognized as a source of greenhouse gas emissions contributing to climate change. This is particularly relevant for the university…

Abstract

Purpose

Air travel is becoming increasingly recognized as a source of greenhouse gas emissions contributing to climate change. This is particularly relevant for the university sector, which relies heavily on staff air travel for domestic and international mobility.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative content and textual analysis of Australian university sustainability policies, documents and Web pages, this paper discusses the extent to which these organizations take the task of reducing emissions from flying seriously.

Findings

Universities fall into one of three groups in this regard. “Air Travel Ignorers” are organizations that either have no sustainability policy or none that recognize air travel as a source of greenhouse gas emissions. The second group – “Recognition without Intervention” – describes universities that do acknowledge the role of air travel in their carbon footprint, but do not propose any means to reduce the amount of flying they do. Third, “Air Travel Substituters” seek to substitute their air travel with a digital form of mobility, usually video conferencing.

Research limitations/implications

The authors then highlight the need to decrease and denormalize university air travel through shifting shared expectations of mobility for events such as conferences and meetings.

Practical implications

By way of a conclusion, the authors discuss the nature of air travel for Australian academia and the relationship between various forms of mobility, connectedness and co-presence.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive analysis of Australian university sustainability policies with respect to air travel.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Amal Abuzeinab, Mohammed Arif, Dennis J. Kulonda and Bankole Osita Awuzie

Sustainability has the potential to bring enormous benefits to our built environment. To release this potential, a change in business models is required. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability has the potential to bring enormous benefits to our built environment. To release this potential, a change in business models is required. The purpose of this paper is to investigate green business models (GBMs) transformation by adopting five essential elements of green value creation and capture: green value proposition (GVP), target group (TG), key activities (KA), key resources (KR), and financial logic (FL).

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study, 19 semi-structured interviews were conducted. Interviewees were selected purposively. The emergent data were analysed with the aid of themes.

Findings

It was observed that significant effort was being made towards enabling the transformation of certain elements pertinent to green value creation: KA and KR. This was particularly so when compared to other elements like GVP, TG, and FL.

Practical implications

Findings from this study should encourage construction managers to align their extant BMs to green activities hence enabling new approaches to green value creation and capture. Furthermore, the study will aid in improving the environmental and economic positions of the value chain within the construction sector.

Originality/value

This research is one of the few empirical academic works investigating GBMs in the construction sector.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Pezhman Ghadimi, Shane O'Neill, Chao Wang and John W. Sutherland

The purpose of this study is to identify a comprehensive list of main enablers of successful implementation of green manufacturing (GM) practices in small and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify a comprehensive list of main enablers of successful implementation of green manufacturing (GM) practices in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Based on the inputs from Irish SMEs' experts, a validated conceptual hierarchy model of the identified enablers is developed to analyse and prioritise the most dominant ones.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a questionnaire survey responded by various professionals in Irish manufacturing SMEs. Experts' opinions were analysed using interpretive structural modelling (ISM) and cross-impact matrix multiplication applied to classification (MICMAC) to distinguish the mutual influences amongst the nine identified enablers.

Findings

The findings revealed that from the Irish SMEs' perspective, strong green supply chain relations are the outcome of successfully implementing GM and not a driver of the other enablers. Furthermore, lower manufacturing costs are found to arise as a result of GM practices in SMEs.

Practical implications

It is discussed that emulating the actions of larger companies will not necessarily yield the same results for SMEs. Innovation will become a cornerstone of remaining competitive in a sustainable environment, which is facilitated by closer green supply chain relations.

Originality/value

The reported findings in this article contribute to theory and practice of GM and SMEs research domains by systematically identified, classified and ranked enablers in a conceptual hierarchal model from the perspective of Irish SMEs. This research lays the foundations for further analysis of the GM practices enablers in a time when UN mandates and EU regulations are increasingly impacting SMEs all around Europe and especially Ireland.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Katherine Ibbotson and Peter Farrell

Low carbon solutions in infrastructure have been well documented and promoted in most areas of the UK except in the context of public sector Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk…

Abstract

Purpose

Low carbon solutions in infrastructure have been well documented and promoted in most areas of the UK except in the context of public sector Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management (FCERM) infrastructure. With the UK Government providing £2.5bn capital investment to reduce risk of flooding and coastal erosion between 2015 and 2020, the carbon impact of this construction programme will have a significant impact on the UK’s carbon targets. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive literature review focusing on the effect of carbon on climate change, the role of UK public sector FCERM construction and organisational cultural challenges in promoting low carbon.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic survey of practising professionals in a leading government agency that procures major FCERM construction projects has been undertaken. The survey covers participants from the whole value chain within the project life cycle, since many authoritative sources call for integration, and for change to be implemented in partner organisations.

Findings

The survey shows that although carbon is considered, it is not yet at the level of importance nor is it prioritised to the extent at which cost is. This is for both public and private sector supply chain organisations. Low carbon, although included in discussions, does not feature as prominently throughout all project stages.

Research limitations/implications

The utilisation of a survey for this research is limited as it merely supports current industry findings, albeit having focused on a specific infrastructure area. Further qualitative research is required to fully explore the findings within the survey, and to establish whether the implementation of a new whole life carbon calculator within FCERM construction will have an impact on the organisational culture and future successful implementation of low carbon construction.

Practical implications

The results of this research identify the specific areas in which industry practitioners involved in promoting and prioritising low carbon could focus on to facilitate the change required to fully embed low carbon into FCERM construction.

Social implications

This research supports industry knowledge specifically for public sector FCERM construction, and the changes to organisational culture required to fully embed low carbon solutions in public sector construction. These changes may have an impact on the amount of carbon being used, which can positively affect climate change as a whole.

Originality/value

The literature review shows that carbon has a clear impact on climate change, and organisational culture and leadership can facilitate the successful implementation of new initiatives. However, previous attempts to embed low carbon into infrastructure construction practice have had limited success to date. The survey findings support the view that organisational culture and leadership can influence the successful embedding of low carbon solutions, and why this has been a challenge.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Zeng Huawei, Wang Chengtao, Qiao Jie, Zhang Bingjing, Zhao Bing and Dai Chuangyun

The Monascus pigment has been widely applied in the food processing industry as a functional additive. Lovastatin and polysaccharides are two important bio-active…

Abstract

Purpose

The Monascus pigment has been widely applied in the food processing industry as a functional additive. Lovastatin and polysaccharides are two important bio-active materials found in Monascus. Citrinin is considered as mycotoxin. Thus, it is important to produce high yields of intracellular Monascus pigments with high yields of lovastatin and polysaccharides, while maintaining low citrinin yields under liquid fermentation.

Design/methodology/approach

The intracellular yields of pigments, lovastatin, polysaccharides and citrinin; biomass; and reducing the sugar content of Monascus purpureus HBSD 08 were determined every day during a 10-day culturing period using lactose, maltose, sucrose, glucose, glycerine and xylose as the sole carbon sources. Additionally, the pigment composition was analysed by a thin layer chromatography (TLC) and the in vitro antitumor activities of the pigments were determined.

Findings

The maximal yield of pigments (55.44 U/mL after six days of culture) and lovastatin content (1,475.30 µg/L after five days of culture) were obtained in the presence of glucose and maltose as the sole carbon sources, respectively. The suitable carbon sources for high intracellular polysaccharides yields were sucrose, maltose and xylose. Glucose should not be chosen as the sole carbon source because of its high food safety risk. In vitro antitumor activities of pigments in the presence of different carbon sources were in the order of xylose > glucose = maltose > glycerine > sucrose = lactose. The pigment compositions in the presence of different carbon sources were the same from the TLC analysis. Thus, maltose displayed high intracellular yields of pigments, lovastatin and polysaccharides; high food safety against citrinin, and high in vitro antitumor activity during the ten days culturing period.

Originality/value

This study shows us the benefits of using maltose as a substrate in the production of intracellular Monascus pigments while ensuring economic and food safety.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000