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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Lourdes Pérez, Victor Dos Santos Paulino and Jesus Cambra-Fierro

The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to provide further insights into the challenges and opportunities that arise from simultaneously being an entrant and an incumbent…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to provide further insights into the challenges and opportunities that arise from simultaneously being an entrant and an incumbent and, second, to help these firms effectively use supply chain management capabilities to respond to disruptive threats.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an “insights from industry” paper. It is based on a retrospective analysis of rich data obtained at the SIRIUS Chair in Toulouse, France, from an important cluster of aerospace firms and the authors’ accumulated experience.

Findings

The authors found that under conditions of disruptive change, the ability to make the final customer the focal point and to build a comprehensive understanding of the overall supply network are key in shaping and taking advantage of future opportunities. These abilities enable firms to analyze different scenarios and identify the roles they want to play, the collaborations they need to establish and the possible internal changes required.

Originality/value

This paper offers several new perspectives from practice. The authors analyze two types of space industry innovations: individual small satellites (or “smallsats”) and smallsat constellations. Three types of capabilities are focused on: inside-out, outside-in and spanning. Disrupt-or-be-disrupted does not fully describe the dynamics the authors observed; cooperative competition and complementarity provide a better framework for ideas on how to cope with disruptive opportunities.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Emily Mary Grott, Jesus Cambra-Fierro, Lourdes Perez and Mirella Yani-de-Soriano

The aim of this study is two-fold. Firstly, to examine the outcomes of co-creation from a customer perspective using well-recognised customer management variables…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is two-fold. Firstly, to examine the outcomes of co-creation from a customer perspective using well-recognised customer management variables (customer satisfaction, loyalty and word-of-mouth (WOM). Secondly, to assess potential cross-cultural differences that may exist within the context of co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was completed in the banking services industry, and the final valid sample comprised individuals from the UK and Spain. Multi-sample analysis was carried out using PLS software.

Findings

Co-creation has a direct influence on customer satisfaction, customer loyalty and WOM; co-creation activities lead to cumulative customer satisfaction, which also affects customer loyalty and positive WOM. Furthermore, the results show that the direct relationships between co-creation and loyalty and WOM are more powerful for British consumers than Spanish consumers, who need to feel satisfied prior to demonstrating loyalty and engaging in positive WOM.

Practical implications

Firms can use co-creation as a strategic tool if they provide trustworthy collaboration spaces. Furthermore, firms need to adapt the way they interact, listen and respond to customers in different cultural contexts. Trustworthy collaboration spaces and adapting to cultural differences can result in customers who are more satisfied, loyal to the company and more likely to carry out positive WOM, which can ultimately lead to future business.

Originality/value

This study provides insights into co-creation from a customer perspective. Although much service research has examined the drivers of customer co-creation, literature that analyses the consequences of customer co-creation is still scarce. Moreover, this is the first study to provide empirical evidence of cross-cultural differences within the context of co-creation.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Lourdes Pérez and Jesús Cambra-Fierro

The aim of this paper is to understand the process of value creation in business-to-business (B2B) contexts from the perspective of small- and medium-sized firms (SMEs)…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to understand the process of value creation in business-to-business (B2B) contexts from the perspective of small- and medium-sized firms (SMEs). Small businesses are challenged to compete and collaborate with larger firms. While the “sharks” dilemma (often the most dangerous sharks also have the most valuable resources) focuses on specific defences, the authors emphasize a value generation perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of asymmetric relationships is taken as a reference and examined using a longitudinal multi-case study.

Findings

The authors results demonstrate how small firms not always assume an inferior, defensive position. Ambitious and growth-oriented SMEs learn to collaborate with larger partners and exhibit a proactive attitude towards relationship management. They understand the importance of developing social ties. They foster frequent and informal communication with their customers, favouring personal visits as a means to receive advice for directing their research efforts and exchange information and views. Such ties help them to develop shared plans and goals.

Research limitations/implications

In asymmetric relationships, partner selection models should help firms to concentrate their efforts in a reduced group of key partners. These models should include not only economic performance indicators – variables such as flexibility and autonomy – but also innovation and improvement in processes, image, prestige and positioning, access to markets and stability.

Originality/value

The authors found insight into a novel concept: dual-value appropriation, where partners do not split the pie of the total value generated, as frequently proposed in the literature, but fully appropriate a different and unique value from the relationship. The authors further highlight the important role played by the committed champions in developing communication and trust.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Lourdes Pérez and Jesús J. Cambra-Fierro

Research suggests that asymmetry has a negative impact on value creation and value distribution and assumes that the smaller partner has an inferior position and must…

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594

Abstract

Purpose

Research suggests that asymmetry has a negative impact on value creation and value distribution and assumes that the smaller partner has an inferior position and must defend itself from value misappropriation. However, industries are plagued with a range of business relationships of varying degree of imbalance. Ambitious and growth-oriented small firms enter relationships with larger counterparts, tolerate the imbalance and learn to achieve successful outcomes. In spite of the increasing importance of asymmetric partnerships, there are still many research and conceptual lacunas.

Design/methodology/approach

Ideas and conclusions of this paper are based on the authors’ experience as well as on evidence from a qualitative case study conducted at a small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) and one of its key larger partners.

Findings

Findings reveal that asymmetric partnerships may offer a clear route to value creation and innovation for firms. Moreover, both partners can fully appropriate the value jointly generated.

Originality/value

Asymmetric partnerships, generally characterized by large dissimilarities between firms, offer the possibility of moving beyond the zero-sum game, where firms obtain value at the expense of their partners. By examining the development and dynamic aspects of these partnerships, we found a novel concept, “dual-value appropriation”, and addressed the issues of how and under which conditions dual value emerges to explain the success of asymmetric partnerships.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Fatima Bensajjay, Saliha Alehyen, Mohammed El Achouri, Najat Hajjaji, Abdelkbir Bellaouchou, Lourdes Perez and Maria Rosa Infante

The purpose of this investigation is the evaluation of the inhibitive performance of a new “gemini” surfactant in the series of bis‐quat: N, N, N′, N″, N″‐pentamethyl…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this investigation is the evaluation of the inhibitive performance of a new “gemini” surfactant in the series of bis‐quat: N, N, N′, N″, N″‐pentamethyl diethyleneamine‐N, N″‐di‐[tetradecylammonium bromide] on the corrosion of iron in 1 M HCl by gravimetric, potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance measurements. The effect of the temperature on the corrosion behavior of iron in 1 M HCl without and with inhibitor is studied in the temperature range (298‐333 K). This work also attempts to correlate thermodynamic and kinetic parameters with the inhibition effect.

Design/methodology/approach

The inhibition efficiency of gemini synthesized is investigated by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and impedance spectroscopy methods.

Findings

The synthesized gemini bis‐quat acted as a good inhibitor in 1 M HCl, and inhibition efficiency increased with inhibitor concentration and temperature. Polarization curves showed that the surfactant was a mixed‐type inhibitor in hydrochloric acid. Impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that the inhibitor acted through the formation of a multilayer film at the iron surface. The adsorption of inhibitor on the iron surface obeyed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm equation. The inhibition effect was satisfactorily explained by both thermodynamic and kinetic parameters.

Originality/value

The adsorption of surfactants in the metal surface can markedly change the corrosion resisting property of the metal. So the study of the relation between the adsorption and corrosion inhibition is of a great importance. This was the first attempt to study the inhibition properties of gemini surfactants at the host laboratory.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 58 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Lourdes Perez, Jeryl Whitelock and Juan Florin

The aim of this paper is to gain a better understanding of how small technology start‐ups learn about a key customer in the context of B2B relationships, and to propose a…

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3511

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to gain a better understanding of how small technology start‐ups learn about a key customer in the context of B2B relationships, and to propose a model of interfirm learning with customers.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative case‐based approach, the authors immerse themselves in the development of three learning alliances between technology startups and industry leaders, two successes and one failure, to gain an in‐depth understanding of the dynamics involved. Data were collected on both sides of the alliance dyad.

Findings

The paper delineates four learning cycles: alliance inception, joint‐learning, specialization and discovery. These learning cycles constitute sequences of increasing understanding, cooperation, and higher order learning between the partners; evolving from an exchange of existing knowledge to the joint development of new knowledge.

Originality/value

This study contributes to an integration of the alliance and marketing literatures by offering empirical evidence of a different type of alliance, namely the reciprocal learning alliance. It also contributes to broadening our understanding of market orientation in inter‐organizational settings. In the context of business‐to‐business relationships, the study has identified four critical dimensions of learning alliance success, and proposed how they could be measured: Learn about customers; Interact with customers; Customer‐specific investments; and Co‐develop breakthrough innovations. Finally, the study demonstrates the significant role played by “committed champions”.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Jesús Cambra‐Fierro, Juan Florin, Lourdes Perez and Jeryl Whitelock

The purpose of this paper is to establish a framework for clarifying and extending the concept of inter‐firm market orientation (IMO) and to complement the relatively…

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3774

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a framework for clarifying and extending the concept of inter‐firm market orientation (IMO) and to complement the relatively small body of literature related to this concept.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework is informed by empirical research based on a longitudinal multi‐case study.

Findings

This research identifies a nexus linking IMO with value creation in inter‐firm partnerships. The findings also suggest that IMO has an impact on companies' performance in terms of knowledge transfer, innovation and market access.

Research limitations/implications

IMO contributes to value creation processes in the context of strategic networks.

Originality/value

A discussion of these findings, together with implications for practice and proposals for further research, is provided.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Lourdes Pérez and Jesús Cambra-Fierro

This paper aims to provide guidance for managers so that they may develop advanced supply chain management (SCM) capabilities in the context of asymmetric alliances. These…

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1131

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide guidance for managers so that they may develop advanced supply chain management (SCM) capabilities in the context of asymmetric alliances. These alliances, generally characterised by large dissimilarities between the partners, often facilitate value-creating opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using case studies, the paper analyses similarities and differences in SCM between symmetric and asymmetric alliances within supply networks. It focusses on the key dimensions of complementarity, value distribution, relational management and specialisation.

Findings

It was found that the question of complementarity, although important, should not be equated to the need for symmetry but to the ability of the firms in the supply network to learn to work together. For small firms who seek co-creation with large partners, this means collaboration, specialisation through relation-specific investments, flexibility and understanding the overall value system in which their business relationships compete is important.

Practical implications

Small firms seeking to develop advanced SCM capabilities have to accept responsibility for selecting a reduced number of key partners and managing relationships. Firms should proactively use the contractual process to learn about partners' expectations and goals and to identify committed champions. These factors play an important role in developing communications and trust, as small firms do not have easy access to senior managers in large corporations.

Originality/value

This paper discovered a novel concept – dual value appropriation – where partners do not divide the total value generated as frequently proposed in the literature, but that it is fully appropriated, as it represents a different value proposition for each of them.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

María José Mayorga Fernández, Noemí Peña Trapero and Lourdes De La Rosa Moreno

This paper focuses on analysis of the incorporation of a Lesson Study cycle within the university training proposal, as a teaching strategy in initial training in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper focuses on analysis of the incorporation of a Lesson Study cycle within the university training proposal, as a teaching strategy in initial training in the Infant Education Degree.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was conducted through a case study methodology.

Findings

Proposing training strategies based on this methodology encourages both the reconstruction of future teachers' practical knowledge and also adequate professional development from initial training.

Research limitations/implications

The main constraint in the study was the cost-benefit ratio, since this experience has required significant practical and emotional dedication by the people involved, while the expected results have only been partially evident in the students. This would seem to imply that the strategy requires continuity over time in order for future education professionals to take it fully on board.

Practical implications

More continuity in such experiences would be required in order to fully analyse their actual value. To this end, the experiences need to be more closely related to the university curriculum, and there must be greater coordination between the subjects in order to ensure a holistic approach to LS.

Originality/value

This article sets out an LS experience as a collaborative action-research strategy that promotes the reconstruction of students' practical knowledge and their professional development in initial training.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Eileen Oliver

Cuba’s 1959 Revolution brought about dramatic changes not only in that island‐nation but also in the USA. Cubans, and later Cuban‐Americans, have changed the face of Miami…

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2948

Abstract

Cuba’s 1959 Revolution brought about dramatic changes not only in that island‐nation but also in the USA. Cubans, and later Cuban‐Americans, have changed the face of Miami and south Florida. The economic and social successes of Cuban‐Americans, the third largest Latino group in the USA, are prevalent in scholarly and popular literature. In this annotated bibliography, the author presents journal articles, chapters in books, books, and human rights reports, published between 1990 and 1998, as well as World Wide Web sites, that discuss the Cuban‐American experience. Articles from the popular literature are not included, nor are materials that deal primarily with Cuba or Cuba‐USA relations.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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