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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Peter McGough, Susan Kline and Louise Simpson

As the US health system moves to value-based care and aligns payment with quality, the role of the primary care provider (PCP) is becoming ever more important. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

As the US health system moves to value-based care and aligns payment with quality, the role of the primary care provider (PCP) is becoming ever more important. The purpose of this paper is to outline a successful population health and care management strategy depending on accountable teams to standard workflow and agreed upon process and outcome measures in order to achieve the triple aim of improved health, patient experience, and value.

Design/methodology/approach

Two major areas of focus for primary care are ensuring that all patients receive appropriate evidence-based screening and prevention services and coordinating the care of patients with chronic conditions. The former initiative will promote the general health and well-being of patients, while the latter is a key strategy for achieving better outcomes and reducing costs for patients with chronic conditions.

Findings

To achieve these goals while managing a busy practice requires that the authors leverage the PCP by engaging clinical and non-clinical team members in the care of their patient population. It is essential that each team member’s role be clearly defined and ensures they are working at the top of their scope.

Originality/value

This initiative was successful because of the compelling objectives, the buy-in generated by using Lean methodology and engaging the team in the design process, use of multiple feedback mechanisms including stories, dashboards, and patient feedback, and the positive impact on providers, staff, and patients.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Jon Pemberton, Anna Buehring, George Stonehouse, Louise Simpson and Ian Purves

This paper charts the technological developments that have taken place within primary health care during the last 20 years, drawing upon previous research and presenting…

Abstract

This paper charts the technological developments that have taken place within primary health care during the last 20 years, drawing upon previous research and presenting new survey findings on the current state of computerisation. The survey reveals that 96 per cent of UK practices use a clinical computer system, with repeat and acute prescribing, the collation of annual data and audits/searches being the most well used applications. The move towards the so‐called “paperless” practice is strongly related to GPs’ computing expertise, with larger practices more likely to have gone in this direction. Over half of GP practices now have access to the Internet. Improvement of computing skills appears a major determinant of successful integration of technology within a practice. There is a need to develop a social architecture and learning environment that allows GPs to provide good quality health care with clinical computer systems at its heart.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 16 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1911

Many of the difficulties that have been experienced by Health Authorities in this country in the examination of imported butcher's “offal”—using the term “offal” in its…

Abstract

Many of the difficulties that have been experienced by Health Authorities in this country in the examination of imported butcher's “offal”—using the term “offal” in its trade sense—would seem to have been due to injudicious methods of packing on the other side. The organs that constitute “offal”—livers, plucks, kidneys, sweetbreads, and so forth—have hitherto been closely packed into a bag, box, or crate, and the whole mass then frozen hard. Hence on arrival at the port of inspection the separate examination of these organs for possible disease conditions was rendered a matter of extreme difficulty. The exporters have now, it appears, almost all arranged for the separate freezing of the larger organs before packing, and in the case of smaller organs, such as kidneys and sweetbreads, some packers now make use of shallow boxes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1994

Peter Simpson, Louise Grisoni and Rodney Cox

Explores the differences between two categories of in‐company managementdevelopment programme: those that offer participants a nationallyrecognized qualification and those…

Abstract

Explores the differences between two categories of in‐company management development programme: those that offer participants a nationally recognized qualification and those that are not assessed. The argument is made that certificating a programme will lead to different forms of experience and outcome for the participants and for the organization and believes that it is important for clients and providers to be aware of these differences when engaged in selecting, planning and running a management development programme if maximum benefit from the investment is to be gained. A tentative contingency theory is outlined.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Louise Tourigny, Jian Han and Vishwanath V. Baba

This study aims to explore how gender influences the impact of interpersonal trust among subordinates on spontaneous work behaviors such as sharing responsibility and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how gender influences the impact of interpersonal trust among subordinates on spontaneous work behaviors such as sharing responsibility and knowledge and engaging in organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). The goal is to understand factors that contribute to the effectiveness of women as supervisors and subordinates in the manufacturing sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 308 subordinates and 71 supervisors working in the manufacturing sector in mainland China using a survey methodology. Descriptive statistics, correlation, confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical moderated regression were the statistical techniques used.

Findings

Results indicate that both affect- and cognition-based trust among subordinates positively impact responsibility- and knowledge-sharing behaviors, OCB-individual (OCB-I) and OCB-organization (OCB-O). For female subordinates, the gender of the supervisor alters the relationship between both forms of trust and responsibility-sharing behavior and OCB-O, but not knowledge-sharing behavior and OCB-I. Cognition-based trust plays a dominant role for male subordinates, while affect-based trust is more relevant to female subordinates. Finally, while the gender of the supervisor moderates the impact of both affect- and cognition-based trust, it is significant for female subordinates only.

Research limitations/implications

This study is not without limitations. First, the authors had access to a limited sample of female supervisors and female subordinates, which is not uncommon in the manufacturing sector that is mostly composed of male employees. Second, the cross-sectional nature of the study does not allow the capture of the impact of change in trust over time. However, it is believed that the multi-source design, the novelty of the study’s findings and their implications to interpersonal trust theory and supervisory practice compensate for the limitations. For starters, this study endorses the crucial role of interpersonal trust among employees in predicting important organizational behaviors. It corroborates the conceptual distinction between affect- and cognition-based trust and empirically validates the concepts of affect- and cognition-based trust, RSB, KSB and OCB in China. It uses multi-source data and measures behavioral outcomes of workers as observed by their immediate supervisors. These contributions speak to the empirical viability of our theoretical framework that may be useful to those contemplating cross-cultural research.

Practical implications

The study started with the question, does gender matter. The answer is that it does and that it has implications for human resource management. The gender of both supervisors and subordinates affect the way interpersonal trust among workers elicit desirable organizational behaviors such as sharing responsibilities, sharing knowledge and other forms of citizenship behavior. Female supervisors need to build trust among their female employees before they can expect effective organizational behavior. The story is different for male supervisors and male employees. This has implications in the way male and female supervisors are trained. It also has implications for work group formation and composition. What the study does not know is whether these findings are limited to the manufacturing sector or unique to China. It is recommended that a cross-cultural comparative research be undertaken to address those questions.

Social implications

In light of the study’s findings, it is proposed that supervisory training and development programs should take into consideration that female supervisors encounter more challenges in eliciting favorable behaviors on the part of female subordinates in a work environment that is male-dominated.

Originality/value

The unique value contribution of the study pertains to the role of gender – the gender of the supervisor and the gender of the subordinate in shaping organizational behavior. Specifically, the authors show that the supervisor’s gender influences the relationship between affect-based trust and RSB, KSB and OCB-O and the relationship between cognition-based trust and OCB-O. Their point is that these relationships are significant only for female supervisors. In addition, they show that gender similarity between the supervisor and the supervised matters, only when both are female. These findings limit the role of interpersonal trust in eliciting favorable organizational behavior across the board and question the portability of interpersonal trust theory across industries and cultures.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

Emma Louise Barrett, Zachary W. Adams, Erin V. Kelly, Natalie Peach, Rachel Hopkins, Bronwyn Milne, Sudie E. Back and Katherine L. Mills

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) frequently co-occur (PTSD+SUD). The onset of these disorders often occurs during adolescence. There…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) frequently co-occur (PTSD+SUD). The onset of these disorders often occurs during adolescence. There is limited understanding of the perspectives of service providers working with this population. The purpose of this paper is to identify the practices, attitudes, experiences and training needs of Australian service providers treating adolescents with PTSD+SUD.

Design/methodology/approach

Service providers in Australia were invited to complete an anonymous online survey regarding their experiences working with adolescents who have PTSD+SUD. Ninety participants completed the 48-item survey that comprised multiple choice and open-ended questions.

Findings

Service providers estimated that up to 60 per cent of their adolescent clients with PTSD also have SUD. They identified case management, engaging with caregivers and difficult client emotions as specific challenges associated with working with this population. Despite this, providers rated treating PTSD+SUD as highly gratifying for reasons such as teaching new coping skills, developing expertise and assisting clients to achieve their goals. There were mixed perspectives on how to best treat adolescents with PTSD+SUD, and all participants identified a need for evidence-based resources specific to this population.

Originality/value

This is the first survey of Australian service providers working with adolescents who experience PTSD+SUD. The findings improve our understanding of the challenges and rewards associated with working with this population, and provide valuable information that can enhance clinical training and guide the development of new treatment approaches for this common and debilitating comorbidity.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Paul Nieuwenhuysen

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used…

Abstract

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used in online information and documentation work. They fall into the following categories:

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2018

Isaac Cunningham and Louise Platt

The UK city of culture (UKCoC) scheme developed out of Liverpool’s year as European Capital of Culture in 2008 and is synonymous with urban renewal. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The UK city of culture (UKCoC) scheme developed out of Liverpool’s year as European Capital of Culture in 2008 and is synonymous with urban renewal. The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges of bidding for this scheme.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with bid team members from four out of the five short-listed cities for the 2021 award. Respondents were situated across the country and, at the time, finalising their Stage 2 bids. Thematic analysis was conducted to analyse the responses.

Findings

The UKCoC scheme is a top-down scheme which is delivered “in place”. The danger of the top-down vision is that local people cannot often conceptualise what it might mean within the context of their own locality. The findings here suggest that bid team members are attempting to do this despite obvious time pressures. The research presented here suggests that cities are reconciling the top-down, criteria-led nature of the scheme with a real reflection on how to make that work for their locality which is distinctive.

Social implications

The UKCoC scheme has proved to galvanise communities to reflect on the nature of their places and think about what makes them unique in comparison to the other bidding cities. The bidding teams acknowledge the challenges of bidding but there is a sense that competing is worth the investment.

Originality/value

This paper offers a unique insight into a recent competitive placemaking scheme and reflects on how placemaking can potentially be reconciled as both top-down and place-based.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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