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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Louise Gwenneth Phillips

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how being led by a young child to unknown destinations without shared language offers an experience of indeterminacy that opens up…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how being led by a young child to unknown destinations without shared language offers an experience of indeterminacy that opens up (re)thinking of political co-existence.

Design/methodology/approach

The relational arts project The Walking Neighbourhood hosted by children challenges the social practice of adults chaperoning children through public streets by inviting children to curate and lead unknown adults on walks of local neighbourhoods. This paper focusses on sensory ethnographic research of one encounter of a child-curated walk when this project took place in Chiang Mai, Thailand. The experience is relayed through multilayered sensorial storytelling inter-woven with diffractive analysis informed from a post-humanist agential realist position (Barad, 2007, 2012).

Findings

Perceptions, knowings, imaginings, memories and connections are read as explanations of intra-actions in the child-led walk to produce new meaning in the phenomena of political co-existence. Emergent, embodied, sensorial listening produces new awareness and understandings of intra-acting beings in an urban space regardless of age or form.

Social implications

Application of ethical ontological epistemological practice through emergent, embodied, sensorial listening to others opens affectual ethical ways of being and knowing for justice-to-come in political co-existence.

Originality/value

The concept of child-led walks is innovative as a political act by shifting from vertical adult-child relations to horizontal relations. Post-humanist agential realism is a new and emerging theory that offers possibilities to reconceptualise co-existence with others in public spaces.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Louise Phillips, Stephanie Tannis‐Ellick and Betsy Scott

Observations have been made that mental health students receive very little support following observing patients displaying suicidal behaviour. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Observations have been made that mental health students receive very little support following observing patients displaying suicidal behaviour. The purpose of this paper is to conduct a small‐scale empirical study to investigate this issue further.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach used in this study is phenomenological. Qualitative data were obtained through semi‐structured interviews consisting of a range of questions asking mental health student nurses about their experiences of support in practice. The data are analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

As well as issues relating to the support of mental health student nurses in practice, there are many ethical issues raised in this paper. These include student responsibilities while in placement areas; students as having a supernumerary status; and the inclusion of students in supervision and debriefing sessions following traumatic incidents.

Research limitations/implications

This small‐scale exploratory study was conducted with a small number of students in one University. However, the study provides a strong starting point for further research on the support students receive during their mental health nurse training.

Originality/value

This paper makes some recommendations on ways to improve the support of students in practice, including maintaining and supporting the role of Practice Experience Managers who spend a considerable amount of time in placement areas interacting with students and feeding back relevant practice concerns to University staff.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 January 2011

Sharon Doubet and Amanda C. Quesenberry

Early in the 20th century, many began to voice growing concern over such issues as infant mortality, childhood diseases, and child labor (Anastasiow & Nucci, 1994). At this time…

Abstract

Early in the 20th century, many began to voice growing concern over such issues as infant mortality, childhood diseases, and child labor (Anastasiow & Nucci, 1994). At this time, physicians, child advocates, and the general public began to speak out about social concerns regarding children, including those living in orphanages and those with mental illness or intellectual disabilities. These concerns came about at a time when psychologists studying young children began to accept that a child's intelligence was impacted by both genetic and environmental factors (Hunt, 1961). Prior to this point, experts believed a child's IQ was set at birth with little that could be done to influence it over time. Although we were beginning to better understand the importance of environmental influences on young children, at this point, most children with disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, cerebral palsy, and epilepsy were institutionalized rather than treated. On the other hand, children who were deaf or blind were more likely to be treated, but were typically sent away to “schools” and were segregated from their families and peers while receiving treatment and education.

Details

History of Special Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-629-5

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1948

EVEN for those who are unable to attend it, there is great interest in the Annual Meeting of the Library Association and, in some ways, the coming one in May at Scarborough has…

Abstract

EVEN for those who are unable to attend it, there is great interest in the Annual Meeting of the Library Association and, in some ways, the coming one in May at Scarborough has many features to justify it. It will follow the pattern that is now familiar and which, in a measure, is imposed upon an Association with so many sectional interests. Ours is a day of numbers and in a great congregation the difficult task of the programme‐builder is to find ways of catering both for the whole and for the individual groups. Those who attend ought to be selective; to appear at every meeting may be the duty of a reporter, even of the Editor of a journal such as this, but that is merely because a general record is necessary for their purposes. Members at large cannot, we suggest, do justice to more than two papers a day and find opportunity for those personal conversations which, after all, give practical value to these gatherings.

Details

New Library World, vol. 50 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Abstract

Details

The Lived Experience of Work and City Rhythms: A Rhythmanalysis of London's Square Mile
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-759-4

Abstract

Details

The Lived Experience of Work and City Rhythms: A Rhythmanalysis of London's Square Mile
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-759-4

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

THAT WAS A BRAVE and surprising report that Prof. Elie Kedourie sent in to the Centre for Policy Studies, the more so because the professor is himself working at London University.

Abstract

THAT WAS A BRAVE and surprising report that Prof. Elie Kedourie sent in to the Centre for Policy Studies, the more so because the professor is himself working at London University.

Details

Work Study, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Robert H. Herz

Abstract

Details

More Accounting Changes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-629-1

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains…

12676

Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 December 2022

Esmee Peters, Louise Knight, Kees Boersma and Niels Uenk

Both high reliability theory (HRT) and “new school” supply chain resilience (SCR) promote a multi-layered, adaptable, transformational, and holistic perspective on organizing and…

2720

Abstract

Purpose

Both high reliability theory (HRT) and “new school” supply chain resilience (SCR) promote a multi-layered, adaptable, transformational, and holistic perspective on organizing and managing. The authors explore whether, and if so how, HRT offer fresh perspectives on the SCR challenges experienced during COVID-19 and on organizing for future resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

Addressing SCR at the interorganizational network level, and blending theory synthesis and case study research, the authors assess if and how HRN constructs and practices can guide analysis of SCR in dynamic, complex networks, and help shape development pathways towards organizing for resilience. Findings draw on thick description and iterative coding of data (58 interviews and 200+ documents) on the buyer network responsible for managing the supply of critical medical products in the Netherlands.

Findings

HRT highlights the interconnectedness of challenges encountered during COVID-19 and helps design future resilience through three lessons. Organizing for SCR requires (1) both anticipation and containment strategies, (2) stable working relationships characterized by trust, and (3) a clear basis of command underpinned by experience-based legitimacy.

Originality/value

Distinctive from SCR, which views crises as “black swans”, HRT organizes around everyday consideration of the risk of failure. Taking a buyer network perspective, the authors move beyond the buyer-supplier network focus in SCR. The authors contend that emphasis on measures such as supplier base management, stockpiling, and domestic production are essential but not sufficient. Rather, HRT implies that deep structural and social ties within the buyer network should also be emphasized.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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