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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Louise Mort Feldmann

– The purpose of this study is to investigate how small business development centers (SBDCs) are working with libraries and librarians to provide assistance to entrepreneurs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how small business development centers (SBDCs) are working with libraries and librarians to provide assistance to entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was distributed to SBDC offices in the mountain west region of the USA to discover if and how they are working with local public and academic libraries and librarians to provide information and services to entrepreneurs.

Findings

Surveys were sent to 72 SBDCs with 31 responding (43 per cent). A total of 48 per cent indicated collaborating with public libraries and 36 per cent work with academic libraries. Resources and services provided by librarians and libraries are consistent with the reporting in case study literature. Responses to successes and issues with these arrangements indicate areas for improvement and consideration in collaborations.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to findings from SBDC offices in the mountain west region. A national survey of efforts might provide more comprehensive results. Future research into whether these partnerships are worthwhile and benefit entrepreneurs and the local economy would be beneficial.

Practical implications

The findings indicate areas in which improvements in collaborations could be made in communication and expectations.

Social implications

This research might inform future collaborations as communities explore economic development and support of local entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This research provides the unique perspective of non-librarians about these working relationships with librarians. The findings may be useful to improving existing collaborations and in consideration of future partnerships.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Patrick Griffis

The purpose of this paper is to provide examples and best practices of an academic library’s strategy of collaborating with community agencies in assisting community…

1456

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide examples and best practices of an academic library’s strategy of collaborating with community agencies in assisting community entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper reflects on the evolution of a new service role for an academic library in providing outreach to community entrepreneurs and is limited to the best practices and lessons learned of one academic library.

Findings

This conceptual paper reflects on an academic library’s outreach strategy for assisting community entrepreneurs; collaboration with community agencies is featured as a best practice with examples and lessons learned.

Originality/value

A recent national study of academic business librarians’ outreach to entrepreneurs has established collaboration with community agencies as an effective service strategy. This conceptual paper reflects on the use of this strategy in a specific academic library’s outreach efforts to community entrepreneurs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Louise Mort Feldmann, Allison V. Level and Shu Liu

The aim of this paper is to describe a process undertaken by Colorado State University Libraries' (CSUL) faculty to address concerns regarding their leadership training and…

3403

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe a process undertaken by Colorado State University Libraries' (CSUL) faculty to address concerns regarding their leadership training and development opportunities within the Libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A Task Force (TF) under the direction of the Libraries Faculty Council (LFC) collected and examined feedback from the faculty librarians, reviewed professional literature, and made recommendations to the Libraries' administration and the Council.

Findings

Recommendations by the TF include: possible training initiatives, leadership role development, and improvement of organizational communication. The work of the TF heightened awareness of the issue within the Libraries. An LFC standing committee is now exploring and offering leadership training opportunities on an ongoing basis. An organizational climate survey has been completed and its results shared among the library faculty to address the issue of communication. In addition, the Libraries' administration has launched a number of strategic initiatives that were open to faculty and staff for leadership and participation. A number of faculty librarians are now leading these initiatives based on their professional strengths and interests.

Originality/value

This article has value to academic librarians and library administrators as they consider improving leadership training and development opportunities in their libraries. As middle management positions in academic libraries diminish, consideration must be given to how academic librarians gain experience or are trained in order to be well‐prepared for future leadership positions. Additionally, library administration should be instrumental in providing such opportunities to their librarians to ensure professional growth.

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Louise Mort Feldmann

The purpose of this paper was to examine on a national scale how academic business librarians are working with community organizations and other libraries to assist local…

1138

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine on a national scale how academic business librarians are working with community organizations and other libraries to assist local entrepreneurs with their information needs.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi method approach was used to gather information. In spring 2012, a survey and follow-up interviews were conducted with academic business librarians. Additionally, business consultants who have worked with librarians were interviewed.

Findings

The survey had 53 respondents. Of those, 40 percent indicated that they collaborate to assist entrepreneurs. Five interviewees confirmed the findings of the survey and discussed their collaborative arrangements. The consultants discussed best practices in working with entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

This research studied academic business librarians and reached those who monitor the buslib-l and brass-l listservs. Not all librarians have the time or take the time to respond to a survey. Additionally, this research only explored collaborations to assist local entrepreneurs and did not specifically focus on campus entrepreneurs and outreach to business schools.

Practical implications

This study provides information on academic business librarians' efforts to assist community entrepreneurs. It also provides some information on lessons learned.

Originality/value

A national study of academic business librarians' outreach to entrepreneurs has not been conducted in the past.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2018

Ashley E. Faulkner

This paper aims to explore the entrepreneurship resources patrons can discover and/or access on the web pages of the largest 46 US public libraries to assess the strength of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the entrepreneurship resources patrons can discover and/or access on the web pages of the largest 46 US public libraries to assess the strength of public libraries’ current support to their entrepreneur-patrons, and where, and by what means, public libraries may wish to expand, or further promote, their support.

Design/methodology/approach

The author completed a website analysis of the largest 46 US public libraries, as defined by the criteria in the ALA publication The Nation’s Largest Public Libraries. Website analysis was completed via a standardized checklist assessment of each library website.

Findings

Public libraries often have print and electronic resources, meeting spaces and programming that could be of use to entrepreneur-patrons, but these resources are sometimes difficult to discover on library websites. Libraries have strong partnering relationships with other government and nonprofit organizations, but they may wish to expand these partnerships further.

Practical implications

Public libraries in the US often have multiple support services to offer entrepreneur-patrons. However, if libraries would like to reach entrepreneur-patrons beyond their walls, as well as within them, they may wish to consider further refining the resources both accessible via their website and promoted on it.

Originality/value

While there are research articles exploring how both academic and public libraries support entrepreneur-patrons, as yet, there has been no in-depth research into how public libraries support their entrepreneur-patrons through not only their in-library offerings but also the materials highlighted and/or available via their website. This research addresses this gap in the literature.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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