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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Kim Liddiard, Sara Louise Morgan and Bronwen Elizabeth Lesley Davies

Transitioning is an inevitable part of being in secure settings, yet little research exists focussing on the experiences of individuals and what interventions might help…

Abstract

Purpose

Transitioning is an inevitable part of being in secure settings, yet little research exists focussing on the experiences of individuals and what interventions might help them to achieve optimal transitions. This seems surprising as the very people who find themselves in secure settings often have attachment difficulties, maladaptive coping strategies and complex mental health needs, which are the factors considered most likely to disadvantage individuals when transitioning. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a repeated design to explore the effectiveness of a person-centred intervention with 18 transitioning individuals in a medium-secure hospital. Three self-report questionnaires were used to capture data relating to anxiety, coping strategies and how individuals feel about the transition pre- and post-intervention. Whole data sets were achieved in 16 cases.

Findings

Following the transition intervention, individuals felt more at ease with the transition ahead of them, their use of adaptive coping strategies had significantly increased and their trait anxiety had significantly lowered.

Research limitations/implications

This study revealed that using a person-centred intervention with transitioning individuals was helpful. However, the study was not able to capture the impact of this intervention over time.

Practical implications

This study highlights the importance of attending to how individuals experience the transition, alongside offering interventions designed to help them adjust and cope to achieve optimal transitions.

Originality/value

Very little is known about what interventions might help individuals achieve a successful transition. Therefore, the findings offer new and significant contributions to this under-researched area.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2018

Robert Searle, Dougal Hare, Bronwen Davies and Sara Louise Morgan

Masculinity is a core cognitive structure that plays a central role in organising attitudinal and behavioural processes. Yet there is limited research focussing upon the…

Abstract

Purpose

Masculinity is a core cognitive structure that plays a central role in organising attitudinal and behavioural processes. Yet there is limited research focussing upon the meaning of masculinity for men who have a past history of violent behaviour, who experience psychotic phenomena and reside in secure forensic settings. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Q-methodology was used to elucidate the factors regarding how men who experience psychotic phenomena perceive their masculinity. Ten participants from a secure forensic setting performed a 49-statement Q-sort task.

Findings

Principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation was performed on the ten completed Q-sorts which revealed a three-factor solution, accounting for 57 per cent of the variance in the data. The factors were interpreted and discussed under the following headings: “assured and asserting maverick”, “calm, confident, composed conformist” and “nurturing provider in the face of adversity”. This revealed that men with psychosis have different, predominantly pro-social explanatory frameworks for their representation of masculinity.

Research limitations/implications

This study revealed that men with psychosis have different, predominantly pro-social explanatory frameworks for their representation of masculinity. However, the study was limited by its lack of longitudinal assessment and the inclusion of a greater number of participants may have enhanced the representativeness and generalisability of the findings.

Practical implications

Therapeutic discussions in respect of masculinity itself could provide men with the opportunity to develop newer, more adaptive conceptualisations of themselves, help them develop greater self-awareness and understanding of the sources of their presenting concerns, which in turn could enhance a provisional formulation of their difficulties. It would also be potentially valuable to understand how these patterns of masculinity map onto coping, recovery style and service engagement. Furthermore, services could also benefit from becoming more aware of hospitalisation being a shameful perhaps stigmatizing time for men with psychosis.

Social implications

It may be useful for people working in healthcare settings to be aware of how the service users they support perceive their masculinity, so the existential and deeper needs of male patients are provided with enough consideration. This is an important point, as some individuals are often reluctant or neglect to enquire about individual’s psychotic experiences and gender identification.

Originality/value

Although forensic psychiatric care is primarily populated by men who have committed violent acts, there is a limited research focussing upon the meaning of masculinity in this context. This is in spite of evidence which shows that maladaptive perceptions of masculinity can be reinforced during time spent residing in secure settings. The cultural constructs of masculinity and their respective impact upon the diagnosis, management and outcome of psychosis has also received little attention. Therefore, this research represents new and significant contributions to the field.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Kim Liddiard, Sara Louise Morgan, Charlotte Hill and Andrew Simmonds

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the current forensic mental health inpatient population within a medium secure unit is more or less complex (i.e. clinical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the current forensic mental health inpatient population within a medium secure unit is more or less complex (i.e. clinical and risk presentations) than former years using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scale (HoNOS) secure. Additionally, the use of the HoNOS secure as a service-wide measure is discussed in terms of its usefulness. Clinical implications and recommendations are offered for the continued use of the HoNOS secure in services more widely.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective case review of completed HoNOS secure assessments for 130 patients over three time intervals 2012, 2015 and 2018 was used. A multivariate analysis was performed on the data using SPSS version 25.

Findings

The findings revealed that contrary to clinical opinion, inpatients’ clinical and risk presentations had not changed significantly overtime.

Research limitations/implications

The study shows the benefits of using the HoNOS secure at a service-wide level to explore and understand similarities and differences in inpatient admissions over time. It also highlights the usefulness of the HoNOS secure for considering different ward characteristics and the needs of patients residing in these environments.

Originality/value

Although much research exists surrounding the individual use of the HoNOS secure in relation to outcomes, there is limited research focusing on use of the HoNOS secure at the service level. The paper therefore provides evidence of the utility and value of the HoNOS secure as a service-level outcome measure.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Stephen A. Doyle, Christopher M. Moore and Louise Morgan

The over‐arching purpose of this research is to explore the issue of supplier management within the context of fast‐moving fashion retailing.

Abstract

Purpose

The over‐arching purpose of this research is to explore the issue of supplier management within the context of fast‐moving fashion retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research utilising key informant interviews was used.

Findings

The research suggests that retailers may adopt a multi‐tiered approach, whereby dynamism and responsiveness are achieved through only partially agile supply chains.

Practical implications

Based on the nature of the qualitative data, the paper provides useful insight into the mechanism by which retailers may balance the need for customer responsiveness with the need for operational and financial viability.

Originality/value

The research highlights the need for the establishment of relationships, the benefits of developing a networked approach, and suggests three distinct stages for a multi‐staged approach.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Leon Monroe Miller

This paper aims to explain how peace research has influenced a re-conceptualization of the international relations (IR) notion of security and conflict, the nature of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain how peace research has influenced a re-conceptualization of the international relations (IR) notion of security and conflict, the nature of the global arena, how to effectively negotiate conflict resolution and strategies for peacebuilding. The paper argues that – although peace research had contributed to reducing the threat of interstate conflict – IR scholars have failed to recognize the need for a more inclusive theoretical strategy for dealing with the new challenge imposed by intrastate conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses Cyprus as a case to compare the conflict management strategies of the liberal peace agenda and the integrative, multi-level, multi-dimensional approach to peacebuilding that is proposed by peace research. The Cyprus case is also used as an example of how the alternative approach to participatory political communication has moved the Cyprus situation off deadlock and in the direction of more promising outcomes.

Findings

The research reveals that although the liberal peace agenda (i.e. the state-centric and established diplomatic approach to conflict management) is effective in getting the two sides of the conflict to the negotiating table, it is inadequate in addressing the underlying cause of conflict; thus, in many instances, there is a reoccurrence of conflict and violence.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited in its ability to place peace research within the context of theoretical developments in the field of IR (e.g. this is even more-so true in regard to researching international politics). Although peace research has made enormous contributions in reducing the threat of interstate conflict (e.g. it is acknowledged that peace research contributed to ending the Cold War, thus bringing about new perspectives on how the global arena is defined, the nature of conflict and the role of communicative action in global relations), there has not been a corresponding development in the theory and practice of IR.

Practical implications

The paper explains how recent developments in communication theory and information communication technology have altered the nature of the global arena and the factors impacting global social movements. Thus, the paper indicates factors that are vital to cross-border interactions, cross-border social movements and alternative approaches to interstate social-political activities that deserve further research.

Social implications

The research analyzes the contribution to participatory political communication in conflict management, reconciliation and peacebuilding processes. The paper also highlights the role of alternative media as a component of the infrastructure for peace (e.g. in the Cyprus context, it provides a forum in which agents from an otherwise divided community can participate in establishing shared values and common objectives).

Originality/value

Cyprus represents one of the longest running conflicts and, in addition, one of the longest running peacekeeping missions of the UN. This paper explains how unique features of the peace research approach to peacebuilding contributes to producing more positive results in what has heretofore been a deadlock in the divided community of Cyprus. Thus, this paper provides an indication of how the lessons learned by peace researchers in the Cyprus micro context contribute to addressing macro-level IR challenges (e.g. north-south and east-west challenges that occur because of outlooks in the proverbial other).

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Abstract

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Jill Madge

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Alex Mitchell, Judith Madill and Samia Chreim

The purpose of this paper is to build understanding of the concept of social enterprise in the social marketing community and to report on empirical research designed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build understanding of the concept of social enterprise in the social marketing community and to report on empirical research designed to develop an understanding the perceptions and practices of marketing within social enterprises. This addresses a significant gap in the current literature base and also provides insights for social marketers seeking to pursue social change initiatives through social enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical investigation uses a qualitative investigation of 15 social enterprises informed by a grounded theory approach. Researchers conducted interviews with senior decision-makers responsible for marketing activities and strategic policy, and gathered additional data regarding the organizations in the form of archival materials, including strategic planning documents, promotional materials and firm-generated online content.

Findings

Strategic marketing practices used by social enterprises are shaped by moral, pragmatic and cognitive legitimacy influences stemming from imperatives to achieve congruence with institutional norms. This study exposes the challenges social enterprises face in developing strategic marketing activities that address business needs, while balancing stakeholder interests linked to the social missions of such organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This qualitative study pursues depth of understanding through focused investigation of a small, regional sample of Canadian social enterprises. The findings demonstrate that social enterprises are similar to both not-for-profit and small- and medium-sized firms in terms of their marketing approaches, but face particular institutional legitimacy challenges when developing and implementing strategic marketing activities.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the influences of institutional legitimacy on marketing practices and approaches in social enterprises. Understanding these influences is crucial for social marketing practitioners, as they develop strategic activities. The findings from the research provide a baseline upon which to begin to build both our theoretical and practical understanding of the potential utilization of social marketing through social enterprises.

Social implications

Understanding the challenges social enterprises face in developing their strategic marketing activities provides deeper insights into social enterprises for social marketers, who might consider using social marketing in such organizations to achieve social change.

Originality/value

This paper offers empirical evidence grounded in depth investigations of 15 social enterprises operating in a Canadian context. The findings help to extend our understanding of the complex institutional influences impacting marketing practices within social enterprise organizations. These institutional influences help to attune social marketers to the potential opportunities and challenges of using social enterprise as an organizational form for launching social marketing programs.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Morgan P. Miles, Martie-Louise Verreynne, Andrew McAuley and Kevin Hammond

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while remaining economically sustainable.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in 2014 of university executives and found that universities in Australia are rapidly transitioning from public supported institutions to an organizational form much more like social enterprise, with all of the organizational, marketing and ethical ramifications.

Findings

Australian universities were found to be focused on maintaining financial viability and that the most significant source of future revenue for Australian universities is perceived to be from international students.

Originality/value

The findings have tremendous public policy and ethical implications – suggesting a shift in the classification of university education from what was generally considered a public good to what is increasingly perceived as a private good in the contemporary market place, with the increasing importance of international students.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Susan Benbow, Louise Taylor and Kathleen Morgan

The authors describe how a user and carers were involved in teaching as part of the MSc in Applied Studies in Ageing and Mental Health at Staffordshire University, the…

Abstract

The authors describe how a user and carers were involved in teaching as part of the MSc in Applied Studies in Ageing and Mental Health at Staffordshire University, the impact that this had on students on the course and evolving plans to develop the work further.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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