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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2020

Joy Tweed and Louise M. Wallace

The purpose of the study is to examine how Non-Executive Directors (NEDs) in the English National Health Service (NHS) commissioning bodies experienced their role and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine how Non-Executive Directors (NEDs) in the English National Health Service (NHS) commissioning bodies experienced their role and contribution to governance.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 31 NEDs of Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) and 8 Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) NEDs. Framework analysis was applied using a conceptualisation of governance developed by Newman, which has four models of governance: the hierarchy, self-governance, open systems and rational goal model.

Findings

NEDs saw themselves as guardians of the public interest. NEDs’ power is a product of the explicit levers set out in the constitution of the board, but also how they choose to use their knowledge and expertise to influence decisions for, as they see it, the public good. They contribute to governance by holding to account executive and professional colleagues, acting largely within the rational goal model. CCG NEDs felt less powerful than in those in PCTs, operating largely in conformance and representational roles, even though government policy appears to be moving towards a more networked, open systems model.

Originality/value

This is the first in-depth study of NEDs in English NHS local commissioning bodies. It is of value in helping to inform how the NED role could be enhanced to make a wider contribution to healthcare leadership as new systems are established in the UK and beyond.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Christine Anne Grant, Louise M. Wallace, Peter C. Spurgeon, Carlo Tramontano and Maria Charalampous

The purpose of this paper is to develop and provide initial validation for the new E-Work Life (EWL) Scale. This measure assesses a range of theoretically relevant aspects…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and provide initial validation for the new E-Work Life (EWL) Scale. This measure assesses a range of theoretically relevant aspects of the e-working experience related to four main areas: job effectiveness, relationship with the organisation, well-being and work-life balance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents structured item development. Internal validity and reliability were tested on a sample of 260 e-workers (65 per cent female, age range 25–74). Correlations of the EWL scale with a measure of general health were tested on a subsample of 119 workers to provide initial evidence of construct validity.

Findings

Exploratory factor analysis supported a 17-item scale assessing four factors: work-life interference, productivity, organisational trust and flexibility. Individual well-being was measured and a pattern of significant correlations against four factors as indicators of general health were found, including mental health and vitality.

Research limitations/implications

A new sample would confirm the strength of the EWL scale alongside further tests of validity. Coping strategies related to the scale would aid mapping of individual competencies for remote e-working to promote e-workers’ self-management, management style and organisational policy.

Practical implications

The EWL scale helps organisations to evaluate and support the well-being of remote e-workers. It provides measurement on three levels: individual, supervisory and organisational, whereby practical strategies for improvement can be linked to the scale.

Originality/value

The EWL scale completes a gap in the research by providing a measure aiding organisations to evaluate and support remote e-worker well-being.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Andy Turner, Alba X. Realpe, Louise M. Wallace and Joanna Kosmala-Anderson

There is growing interest in self-management support for people living with mental health problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of a…

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing interest in self-management support for people living with mental health problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of a co-designed and co-delivered self-management programme (SMP) for people living with depression delivered as part of large scale National Health Service quality improvement programme, which was grounded in the principles of co-production. The authors investigated whether participants became more activated, were less psychologically distressed enjoyed better health status, and quality of life, and improved their self-management skills after attending the seven-week SMP.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a longitudinal study of 114 people living with depression who attended the SMP. Participants completed self-reported measures before attending the SMP and at six months follow up.

Findings

Patient activation significantly improved six months after the SMP (baseline M=49.6, SD=12.3, follow up M=57.2, SD=15.0, t(113)=4.83, p < 0.001; d=0.61). Participants’ experience of depression symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 significantly reduced (baseline M=15.5, SD=6.8, follow up M=10.6, SD=6.9, t(106)=7.22, p < 0.001, d=−0.72). Participants’ anxiety and depression as measured by the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale also decreased significantly (baseline anxiety: M=13.1, SD=4.2, follow up M=10.2, SD=4.4, t(79)=6.29, p < 0.001, d=−0.69); (baseline depression: M=10.3, SD=4.6, follow up M=7.7, SD=4.5, t(79)=5.32, p < 0.001, d=−0.56). The authors also observed significant improvement in participants’ health status (baseline M=0.5, SD=0.3, follow up M=0.6, SD=0.3, t(97)=−3.86, p < 0.001, d=0.33), and health-related quality of life (baseline M=45.4, SD=20.5, follow up M=60.8, SD=22.8, t(91)=−2.71, p=0.008, d=0.75). About 35 per cent of participant showed substantial improvements of self-management skills.

Originality/value

The co-produced depression SMP is innovative in a UK mental health setting. Improvements in activation, depression, anxiety, quality of life and self-management skills suggest that the SMP could make a useful contribution to the recovery services in mental health.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Louise M. Wallace, Matthew Boxall and Peter Spurgeon

Clinical governance is an organisational approach to improving the quality of clinical services. A survey was conducted of 33/40 NHS trusts 2.5 to three years after a…

Abstract

Clinical governance is an organisational approach to improving the quality of clinical services. A survey was conducted of 33/40 NHS trusts 2.5 to three years after a baseline survey of the 46 trusts was conducted in the West Midlands region. Reported outcomes were achieved more often than expected at baseline. Patient outcomes and documented changes in clinical behaviour were both expected and reported in over three quarters at both periods. A more open culture was expected in 65 per cent at baseline and achieved in 84 per cent at time 2. Strategies for change continued to rely on both periods in optional, educative, audit and protocol procedures. The new approaches of critical incident review and consultant appraisal were welcomed. External review and league tables had adverse impacts where results were poor, but minimal impact if results were positive. Conclusions are drawn about more effective means of catalysing change.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Christine A. Grant, Louise M. Wallace and Peter C. Spurgeon

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of remote e‐working on the key research areas of work‐life balance, job effectiveness and well‐being. The study provides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of remote e‐working on the key research areas of work‐life balance, job effectiveness and well‐being. The study provides a set of generalisable themes drawn from the key research areas, including building trust, management style and the quality of work and non‐working life.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an exploratory study into the psychological factors affecting remote e‐workers using qualitative thematic analysis of eleven in‐depth interviews with e‐workers, across five organisations and three sectors. All participants worked remotely using technology independent of time and location for several years and considered themselves to be experts.

Findings

The paper provides insights into the diverse factors affecting remote e‐workers and produces ten emerging themes. Differentiating factors between e‐workers included access to technology, ability to work flexibly and individual competencies. Adverse impacts were found on well‐being, due to over‐working and a lack of time for recuperation. Trust and management style were found to be key influences on e‐worker effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the exploratory nature of the research and approach the research requires further testing for generalisability. The emerging themes could be used to develop a wide‐scale survey of e‐workers, whereby the themes would be further validated.

Practical implications

Practical working examples are provided by the e‐workers and those who also manage e‐workers based on the ten emerging themes.

Originality/value

This paper identifies a number of generalisable themes that can be used to inform the psychological factors affecting remote e‐worker effectiveness.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Clodagh G. Butler, Deirdre O’Shea and Donald M. Truxillo

Interest in psychological resilience has grown rapidly in the last couple of decades (Britt, Sinclair, & McFadden, 2016; King & Rothstein, 2010; Youssef & Luthans, 2007)…

Abstract

Interest in psychological resilience has grown rapidly in the last couple of decades (Britt, Sinclair, & McFadden, 2016; King & Rothstein, 2010; Youssef & Luthans, 2007). Psychological resilience occurs when a person can “recover, re-bound, bounce-back, adjust or even thrive” in the face of adversity (Garcia-Dia, DiNapoli, Garcia-Ona, Jakubowski, & O’flaherty, 2013, p. 264). As such, resilience can be conceptualized as a state-like and malleable construct that can be enhanced in response to stressful events (Kossek & Perrigino, 2016). It incorporates a dynamic process by which individuals use protective factors (internal and external) to positively adapt to stress over time (Luthar, Cicchetti, & Becker, 2000; Rutter, 1987). Building on the dual-pathway model of resilience, we integrate adaptive and proactive coping to the resilience development process and add a heretofore unexamined perspective to the ways in which resilience changes over time. We propose that resilience development trajectories differ depending on the type of adversity or stress experienced in combination with the use of adaptive and proactive coping. We outline the need for future longitudinal studies to examine these relationships and the implications for developing resilience interventions in the workplace.

Details

Examining and Exploring the Shifting Nature of Occupational Stress and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-422-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Michelle Wallace

The National Training Reform Agenda (NTRA) (1989‐1996) was the first iteration of a series of reforms designed to make the Australian workforce more skilled, efficient and…

Abstract

The National Training Reform Agenda (NTRA) (1989‐1996) was the first iteration of a series of reforms designed to make the Australian workforce more skilled, efficient and productive. This paper critically examines how women became “(un)known” in these policy texts in relation to work and training. It also examines contemporaneous practices in some workplaces that assigned certain work identities to women and examines how the women resisted or acquiesced to these assigned identities within the discursive field of the workplace. Comparisons of the positioning effects of policy and workplace practices are made and an argument is presented regarding the marginalisation of women within seemingly benign policy discourses and organisational practices.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Louise Manning

This paper aims to review existing literature in the discipline of food hospitality with specific emphasis on the interaction between food safety management, food safety…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review existing literature in the discipline of food hospitality with specific emphasis on the interaction between food safety management, food safety management systems (FSMS) and food safety culture. It is the first paper in a theme issue of Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, discussing the importance of measuring food safety and quality culture.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines academic literature on FSMS and food safety culture and emerging tools and methods being used to determine their efficacy.

Findings

FSMS provide a framework for determining the resources required and the procedures and protocols, monitoring and verification necessary to deliver safe food. However, a performance gap has been identified in the literature between intended and actual food safety practice. The factors, rituals and behaviours that mediate this divide have been termed by many as “food safety culture”. It has been shown that food safety knowledge does not necessarily lead to behaviour that promotes food safety. Thus, the knowledge–experience–attitude–behaviour dynamic of food safety culture is of crucial importance and worthy of further empirical study in the hospitality industry.

Originality/value

The paper will be of value to practitioners, researchers and other stakeholders involved in the hospitality industry.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Robert H. Herz

Abstract

Details

More Accounting Changes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-629-1

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2020

Abdelrahman Zuraik, Louise Kelly and Vernita Perkins

This study explores the impact of gender on team leadership style and how it impacts team innovation outcomes using the ambidexterity theory (opening and closing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the impact of gender on team leadership style and how it impacts team innovation outcomes using the ambidexterity theory (opening and closing behaviors) of leadership for innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 215 self-report surveys of team members were collected for hypothesis testing. This study tests whether team leader gender moderates the relationship between ambidextrous team leadership and team innovation.

Findings

Female team leaders are engaged in less opening behaviors of ideation, risk-taking and exploration than their male counterparts. Additionally, when female leaders engaged in closing behaviors, which include assigning roles and timelines, they had less impact than the closing behaviors of their male colleagues. Female team leaders were perceived as less effective in leading innovation than males.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines the influence of gender on team leadership and innovation outcomes. There are drawbacks of cross-sectional data, sample selection issues and potential problems of percept–percept relationships.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that female team leads may need greater organizational support and organizational senior leadership support to take risks (opening behavior) to produce greater team innovation and increase leader visibility.

Social implications

Society can achieve even greater innovation outcomes by understanding and addressing the unique obstacles woman team leaders face with innovation. Organizations can benefit from innovation and resilience by supporting women team leaders in their diverse delivery of innovation.

Originality/value

This is the first study to look at the influence of gender and leadership on team innovation outcomes. Ambidextrous leadership theory provides insights into the specific challenges woman team leaders experience; however, so far no research has addressed the innovation outcome challenges female team leaders encounter. Since innovation and leadership can be a key component of visibility, compensation and promotion, it is necessary to investigate the challenges female team leads face in the innovation process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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