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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2021

Christine Mary Harland, Louise Knight, Andrea S. Patrucco, Jane Lynch, Jan Telgen, Esmee Peters, Tünde Tátrai and Petra Ferk

The procurement and supply of crucial healthcare products in the early stages of the COVID-19 emergency were chaotic. To prepare for future crises, we must be able to…

2134

Abstract

Purpose

The procurement and supply of crucial healthcare products in the early stages of the COVID-19 emergency were chaotic. To prepare for future crises, we must be able to describe what went wrong, and why, and map out ways to build agility and resilience. How can this be done effectively, given the highly complex and diverse network of actors across governments, care providers and supply chains, and the extreme uncertainty and dynamism in the procurement system and supplier markets? The purpose of this study was to capture learning from practitioners in “real time” in a way that could frame and inform capacity building across healthcare systems with varying procurement and supply management maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study involved interviews with 58 senior public procurement practitioners in central and regional governments, NGOs and leaders of professional organizations from 23 countries, very early in the COVID crisis. Following the first, inductive phase of analysis leading to five descriptive dimensions, the awareness-motivation-capability (A-M-C) framework was applied in a further round of coding, to understand immediate challenges faced by procurement practitioners, how the complex, multi-level procurement system that shaped their motivations to respond and critical capabilities required to face these challenges.

Findings

Developments across 23 countries and practitioners' learning about procurement and supply in the pandemic crisis can be captured in five overarching themes: governance and organization, knowledge and skills, information systems, regulation and supply base issues. Together these themes cover the strengths and gaps in procurement and supply capability encountered by procurement leaders and front-line personnel. They highlight the various facets of structure, resource and process which constitute organizational capability. However, to account better for the highly dynamic situation characterized by both unprecedented rivalry and cooperation, analysts must also pay attention to actors' emerging awareness of the situation and their rapidly changing motivations.

Originality/value

The application of the A-M-C framework is unique in the healthcare supply chain and disaster management literature. It enables a comprehensive overview of healthcare procurement from a system perspective. This study shows how increasing system preparedness for future emergencies depends both on developing critical capabilities and understanding how awareness and motivation influence the effective deployment of those capabilities.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 March 2022

Carmela Di Mauro, Katri Kauppi and Louise Knight

164

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Katri Kallio and Inka Lappalainen

The purpose of this paper is to examine how collaborative service development in a public-private citizen innovation network can be approached as an organizational…

1811

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how collaborative service development in a public-private citizen innovation network can be approached as an organizational learning process. Although the importance of learning in networks has been highlighted in earlier studies, the actual processes and outcomes have remained less studied, especially in the public service context.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken is based on the theory of expansive learning. The empirical data were gathered in a qualitative case study that focused on a public service organization developing new activities for unemployed youth. The network around this focal organization consisted of citizens as end-users, private employers and a facilitating consultancy company.

Findings

The findings illustrate how and what was learned in the complex network setting and how this learning created potential for collaborative service development in the future. Importantly, the public service organization started to perceive itself as an active agent enhancing collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

The study revealed important interfaces between service development, organizational learning, and innovation activities in networks. This observation is in line with the service-dominant logic, particularly with its focus on actor-to-actor relationships in value co-creation.

Practical implications

The importance of facilitation – particularly for the emergence of the agency of the focal organization – should be taken into account in the development of networked service innovations.

Originality/value

This study illustrates how expansive learning theory may contribute on deepening understanding of the practical collaboration processes, as well as conceptual aims and outcomes of networked service innovations.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Social Capital of Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-770-8

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Christine Harland, Louise Knight, Richard Lamming and Helen Walker

This research aims to assess the risks and benefits of outsourcing for organisations, sectors and nations. The literature on outsourcing contains little evidence of…

31031

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to assess the risks and benefits of outsourcing for organisations, sectors and nations. The literature on outsourcing contains little evidence of research on holistic issues of its impact at systems levels beyond the firm, notably sectors and nations.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi study with senior strategists from private and public sectors captured perspectives and specific observations on benefits and risks of outsourcing. Emergent issues on outsourcing policy, strategy and decision‐making processes were synthesised into a framework for analysing factors associated with outsourcing.

Findings

The findings suggest that a more holistic view of outsourcing is needed, linking local, organisational issues with sector and national level actions and outcomes. In this way, aggregate risks and benefits can be assessed at different systems levels.

Research limitations/implications

Future research might address the motivations for outsourcing; currently there is little research evidence to assess whether outsourcing is a mechanism for failing to solve internal problems, and moving responsibility and risk out of the firm. Additionally most outsourcing research to date has concentrated on an activity either being “in” or “out”; there is little research exploring the circumstances in which mixed models might be appropriate.

Practical implications

The framework provides an aid to research and an aide memoire for managers considering outsourcing.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to knowledge on understanding of outsourcing at different systems levels, particularly highlighting the implications of outsourcing for sectors and nations. Previously most research has focused at the level of the firm or dyadic relationship.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Elmer Bakker, Jurong Zheng, Louise Knight and Christine Harland

The objective of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the impact of context on the adoption of e‐commerce in supply chains.

7591

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the impact of context on the adoption of e‐commerce in supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review, 45 semi‐structured interviews in four different supply chains in the UK healthcare sector, involving 16 different organisations, and additional documentation is used in this study.

Findings

The adoption of e‐commerce in supply chains is simultaneously affected by two contextual meta‐variables: external pressure, which is influenced by supply chain structure, demand and industry characteristics; and internal readiness, which is influenced by IT, organisational and buying need characteristics. Different combinations of these two main variables lead to four different trade‐off situations affecting adoption or non‐adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical research has been undertaken in the specific context of the UK healthcare supply chains. It would be useful to test our findings in other sectors and countries.

Practical implications

The paper helps to understand the contextual factors that affect e‐commerce adoption and concludes with a framework that differentiates four situations that can improve managers' and researchers' understanding of e‐commerce adoption in the future.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is the recognition that the adoption of e‐commerce is affected by factors in both an organisational and a supply chain context, which simultaneously lead to trade‐off decisions. Also, unlike most other studies which refer to supply chains and are limited to an organisational perspective or at most a dyadic perspective, this paper builds up a supply chain picture of context by including perspectives from multiple actors in a chain.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2001

Abstract

Details

Social Capital of Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-770-8

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Louise Platt and Jane Ali-Knight

522

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Abstract

Details

Documents related to John Maynard Keynes, institutionalism at Chicago & Frank H. Knight
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-061-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Michel Laroche, Nicolas Papadopoulos, Louise A. Heslop and Mehdi Mourali

This study was designed to extend knowledge of cognitive processing of country of origin cues by refining the concept of country image and investigating its role in…

14745

Abstract

Purpose

This study was designed to extend knowledge of cognitive processing of country of origin cues by refining the concept of country image and investigating its role in product evaluations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from residents of a large North American metropolitan. A total of 436 usable questionnaires were returned. Data analysis was conducted using the EQS structural equation modeling software

Findings

We found that country image is a three‐dimensional concept consisting of cognitive, affective, and conative components. We modeled the relationships among country image, product beliefs, and product evaluations, and found that country image and product beliefs affect product evaluations simultaneously regardless of consumers' level of familiarity with a country's products. Findings also indicated that the structure of country image influences product evaluations both directly and indirectly through product beliefs. Consistent with affect transfer theory, the results showed that when a country's image has a strong affective component, its direct influence on product evaluations is stronger than its influence on product beliefs. Alternatively, when a country's image has a strong cognitive component, its direct influence on product evaluations was smaller than its influence on product beliefs.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation pertains to the relatively poor psychometric properties of some items. Future research will benefit from further improvements in the measures of country image that tap into the various facets of the construct.

Originality/value

The major contributions of the study consist of the full operationalization of country image as a three‐dimensional concept, and the findings on the impact of country image structure on consumers' evaluation processes.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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