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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Louise Ellison and Sarah Sayce

This paper seeks to set out a series of criteria through which the sustainability of commercial property can be assessed. It is part of a wider research project that…

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6936

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to set out a series of criteria through which the sustainability of commercial property can be assessed. It is part of a wider research project that addresses sustainability as a set of investment risks and is seeking to specify these risks and incorporate them within commercial property investment appraisals.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on existing literature to establish a series of sustainability criteria and then uses focus groups and interviews with industry operators to establish the relevance and potential significance of each criteria to property investment worth.

Findings

The research is focused on the investment performance of commercial property. The findings in the paper are thus driven by a strong economic imperative and the criteria focus on factors within the control of the investor‐owner. The research also reflects the views of a small group of industry operators. However, it sets out a practical set of sustainability criteria, reviewed by industry experts, against which the performance of any commercial property can be assessed.

Originality/value

The paper provides a set of sustainability criteria that are relevant to the performance of property as an operational asset and an investment asset. This will enable market operators to begin to address sustainability within the commercial property stock from a market‐based perspective reflecting the economic imperative that drives the industry. The focus on the investment sector differentiates the work from studies that look at sustainability more broadly as a qualitative issue.

Details

Property Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Louise Ellison and Patrick Brown

The purpose of the paper is to establish a common framework for measuring and reporting sustainability for commercial property assets.

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871

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to establish a common framework for measuring and reporting sustainability for commercial property assets.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a review of a series of benchmarking tools and company reports plus workshop consultation with industry.

Findings

The paper produces an initial list of common metrics for the measurement and monitoring of key sustainability indicators for commercial property. The complexity presented by the heterogeneity of property assets is discussed and suggested means of normalising for particular buildings types is provided.

Research limitations/implications

The research draws largely from desk research of existing tools and company reports. It does not attempt to produce additional reporting methods, rather to draw on and simplify those already in place. The work is largely UK focused.

Practical implications

The work has significant practical implications in that it makes recommendations for a common approach to sustainability reporting at the building level for industry to adopt. This will aid decision making as it will enhance understanding of the sustainability performance of assets relative to their peer group whilst also supporting higher corporate‐level reporting and hence transparency.

Social implications

Greater clarity of reporting for commercial property would be beneficial in reducing the negative impacts of the asset class on the environment and on society.

Originality/value

The paper aims to provide clear guidance in what has become a crowded and complex area. This is of significant value to the sector.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Louise Ellison

This paper draws from survey data to examine the chronic shortage of women in senior management positions in the surveying profession. It is based on the experiences of…

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1827

Abstract

This paper draws from survey data to examine the chronic shortage of women in senior management positions in the surveying profession. It is based on the experiences of women currently working as chartered surveyors in the UK, addressing issues such as the high level of personal and financial investment women surveyors commit to their careers, the perpetuation of limited senior management representation through organisational and other barriers and the apparent inffectiveness of equal opportunities policies to adequately redress the balance.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Stanley McGreal

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243

Abstract

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

John L. Hopkins

Online social networks (OSNs) offer organisations direct access to a plethora of information about their networks of connections and provide the means by which to create…

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3659

Abstract

Purpose

Online social networks (OSNs) offer organisations direct access to a plethora of information about their networks of connections and provide the means by which to create two‐way, business‐to‐consumer (B2C), information channels. Instead of traditional impersonal and one‐direction advertising, organisations can establish a personal and two‐way communication medium, by accepting members and having friends on these platforms. This paper aims to discuss the phenomenon of OSNs, and in particular Facebook, and examine whether they can be employed by small businesses as a resource for growth and adding value.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is presented that examines how a small business in New Zealand, specialising in the distribution of products that help babies and toddlers sleep through the night, has adopted Facebook as a tool for engaging with its largely stay‐at‐home customer base. This examination of The Sleep Store is an impartial study based on findings collected over a period of several months, via a series of interviews supplemented by telephone conversations and e‐mail exchanges, with representatives from the case organisation.

Findings

The Sleep Store's adoption of Facebook was found to offer the business both direct and indirect value. That is direct value, based on the value of transactions, quantified by the increase in turnover experienced through connecting with new customers, and organisational growth; and the indirect value of word‐of‐mouth, positive recommendations and the relative influence that Facebook community members exert on each other, which enable valuable new insights to be made into their business ecosystem.

Research limitations/implications

While the adoption of Facebook in this instance has been found to be an undoubted success it does not, however, suggest that such impressive results would necessarily be expected by all small businesses adopting Facebook in this way. The nature of this business, and their customer base, are an important contributing factor to the overall success of this project.

Practical implications

The findings of this study highlight potential opportunities for small businesses adopting Facebook as an additional sales channel or tool for leveraging new information about their market.

Originality/value

This is original academic research, designed to make a valuable contribution to the growing body of literature, on how small businesses are benefiting from the availability of OSNs.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2010

Áine Dunne, Margaret‐Anne Lawlor and Jennifer Rowley

The purpose of this paper is to explore why young people use and participate in social networking sites (SNSs) with specific reference to Bebo.

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11071

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why young people use and participate in social networking sites (SNSs) with specific reference to Bebo.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is employed in this paper with a view to exploring the uses and gratifications (U and G) that girls aged 12‐14 years, both seek and obtain from the Bebo SNS. The research is conducted in a school setting in Ireland.

Findings

The findings indicate that the participants are actively using Bebo for their own personal motives and gratifications in terms of presenting and managing a certain identity and persona in a social context. Furthermore, the relatively impersonal nature of the online environment is seen to especially facilitate the young participants in negotiating the practicalities and difficulties that can arise offline, in terms of forging identities and managing relationships.

Originality/value

U and G theory has attracted criticism in terms of a perceived limitation that it only serves to offer lists of reasons as to why audiences attend to the media, and furthermore, a perception that much of the extant U and G research has desisted from discerning between gratifications sought (GS) and gratifications obtained (GO). This paper affirms the appropriateness of the U and G theoretical approach in the context of online research. The authors conclude that SNS such as Bebo facilitate the participants in this paper in executing personal aims (for example, identity creation and management) with a view to obtaining certain gratifications (for example, peer acceptance). Therefore, a clear distinction but inextricable link is demonstrated between the GS and GO from participating in SNS.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Cheol Park, Jongkun Jun and Thaemin Lee

This study examined the antecedents and consequences of intensity of SNS use in a cross-cultural context. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of three…

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2561

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the antecedents and consequences of intensity of SNS use in a cross-cultural context. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of three IT-related consumer characteristics – privacy concern, consumer innovativeness and propensity to share information – on the use of social networking sites (SNS) and examine if there are cross-national differences in the relationships between consumer characteristics and SNS use.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed and tested a structural equation model including consumer characteristics related to SNS usage, by using survey data of 977 SNS users in Korea and the US.

Findings

Consumer innovativeness, propensity to share information and privacy concern affected intensity of SNS use and the usage of SNS enabled social capital. In addition, the effects of innovativeness and privacy concern on the intensity of SNS use were greater in the US sample than in the Korean sample. People in the culture of high peer pressure and herding behavior tend to expect more reciprocity in social surveillance, especially among in-group members because they are interested in tracking others in the group. This tendency might alleviate the negative impact of privacy concern on the intensity of SNS use. The positive impact of innovativeness on the intensity of SNS use was alleviated in the collectivism culture. This is maybe because the imitation factor predicts the adoption behavior better than the innovation factor in the collectivism culture.

Research limitations/implications

Despite several notable contributions, this study has a few limitations, which may be overcome by further research. First, this study did not considered many other personality variables. Second, most measurements were retrospective, depending on the respondents’ memory of past shopping behavior. Third, an experimental study will be needed to obtain more accurate effects of the antecedents on the intensity of SNS use in the next stage. Fourth, there are sample limitations in the study. Although this study has some limitations, it also provides very meaningful implications. For example, both the positive impact of innovativeness and the negative impact of privacy concerns on the intensity of SNS use were alleviated in the collectivistic culture.

Practical implications

This finding implies that SNS in the collective culture should focus more on group behavior than individual behavior in order to promote SNS use. In addition, it is an effective strategy to emphasize the innovative function of SNS in individualism culture. As privacy concern is not big problem of SNS usage in collectivism culture, it is an effective strategy to stimulate the needs of in-group surveillance.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature examining cross-cultural influence on SNS use. The study presents how consumer characteristics interact with culture in order to explain the intensity of SNS use.

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Louise J. Suckley, Ilfryn Price and Jason Sharpe

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the value of adopting an organizational ecological perspective to explore behavioural barriers in a UK operations & production…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the value of adopting an organizational ecological perspective to explore behavioural barriers in a UK operations & production management (OPM) setting.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethnographic case study approach was adopted with a narrative ecological stance to deconstruct the perceived realities and the origins of the inter‐departmental barriers applying Scott‐Morgan's unwritten rules methodology.

Findings

Despite an improvement in the physical proximity of the production and quality control departments, the qualitative approach revealed that latent, socially constructed drivers around management, interaction and communication reinforced inter‐departmental barriers. Conflicting enablers were ultimately responsible derived from the organizational structure, which impacted the firm's production resources.

Research limitations/implications

As a case study approach, the specificity of the findings to this OPM setting should be explored further.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates the use of theoretical frameworks in a production and manufacturing organization to provide insights for maximising process effectiveness. Using the organizational ecological perspective to uncover the socially constructed unwritten rules of the OPM setting beneficially impacted on operational effectiveness.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to organization ethnography literature by providing a detailed empirical analysis of manufacturing and services behaviour using an organizational ecology perspective. The example demonstrates that “qualitative” research can have real world impact in an advanced operational context. It also contributes to an ecological or complex adaptive systems view of organizations and, inter alia, their supply chains.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Book part
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Llewella Chapman

On 2 September 2015, it was announced that Tom Ford would again be ‘dressing James Bond’, Daniel Craig, in Spectre (Mendes, 2015) after tailoring his suits for Quantum of

Abstract

On 2 September 2015, it was announced that Tom Ford would again be ‘dressing James Bond’, Daniel Craig, in Spectre (Mendes, 2015) after tailoring his suits for Quantum of Solace (Forster, 2008) and Skyfall (Mendes, 2012). Ford noted that ‘James Bond epitomises the Tom Ford man in his elegance, style and love of luxury. It is an honour to move forward with this iconic character’.

  With the press launch of ‘Bond 25’(and now titled No Time to Die) on 25 April 2019, it is reasonable to speculate that Ford will once again be employed as James Bond’s tailor of choice, given that it is likely to be Craig’s last outing as 007. Previous actors playing the role of James Bond have all had different tailors. Sean Connery was tailored by Anthony Sinclair and George Lazenby by Dimitro ‘Dimi’ Major. Roger Moore recommended his own personal tailors Cyril Castle, Angelo Vitucci and Douglas Hayward. For Timothy Dalton, Stefano Ricci provided the suits, and Pierce Brosnan was dressed by Brioni. Therefore, this chapter will analyse the role of tailoring within the James Bond films, and how this in turn contributes to the look and character of this film franchise more generally. It aims to understand how different tailors have contributed to the masculinity of Bond: an agent dressed to thrill as well as to kill.

Details

From Blofeld to Moneypenny: Gender in James Bond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-163-1

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Louise Racine, Isil Isik Andsoy and Sithokozile Maposa

This paper aims to discuss the barriers to preventative breast cancer screening (BCS) among Muslim Syrian refugee women in a Western Canadian Prairie city.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the barriers to preventative breast cancer screening (BCS) among Muslim Syrian refugee women in a Western Canadian Prairie city.

Design/methodology/approach

Situated within a larger mixed-method study aimed at identifying barriers and facilitators to breast cancer (BC) preventative practices, the authors interviewed three key informants to get an in-depth understanding of the cultural, religious and social factors affecting knowledge of BC and BCS practices among Muslim Syrian refugee women.

Findings

Qualitative findings confirm quantitative results revealing that knowledge about BC and cultural and religious barriers on gender might translate into poor health outcomes for Muslim Syrian refugee women in a Western Canadian city.

Research limitations/implications

This research has limitations related to the sample size and the lack of generalizability to all refugee women. Results indicate the need to develop culturally tailored intervention programs to increase breast awareness and participation in breast-self-examination, clinical breast examination and mammography. The study has implications for health-care policy. Muslim Syrian refugee women need to be educated about BC upon arrival in Canada to counteract low participation rates, promote positive health outcomes and decrease potential costs to the health-care system.

Originality/value

Evidence on Muslim Syrian refugee women’s knowledge and beliefs on BC is sparse. This study addressed this gap by documenting a lack of knowledge and barriers to BCS among Muslim Syrian refugee women.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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